Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, Core Information Document

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Scholarly level: 
Faculty/Staff
Date created: 
2007
Keywords: 
Cognitive behavioural therapy
Mental health
Abstract: 

Cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) holds a unique status in the field of mental health – CBT is effective for many psychological problems, is relatively brief, and is well received by individuals. A large volume of research has been published regarding CBT, including a number of well-designed studies involving people in “real world” clinical settings. Yet despite this large base of evidence, information about CBT has not been well communicated to consumers, families, and providers of health care. Consequently, CBT is not being used as extensively as the research would warrant. Many individuals (consumers, families, and professionals alike) are unaware of the effectiveness of CBT for different problems. There is additional uncertainty about the effectiveness of different formats of CBT (for example, individual, group or self-help formats), who can provide CBT, how to access their services, and other treatments with which CBT is used (for example, the use of medication and CBT together). This Core Information Document has been assembled for the benefit of individuals, families and service providers interested in a broad summary of information relating to CBT and its effectiveness.

Language: 
English
Document type: 
Report
Rights: 
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