Health Sciences Capstone Projects

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Impacts of Aboriginal Early Childhood Development Programs: A Case for the Evaluation of BC First Nations Head Start On-Reserve Programs

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2017-04-11
Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project

Negative Consequences of Workplace Inspections for Indoor and Im/migrant Sex Workers: Enhanced Barriers to Health Access among Sex Workers in a Canadian Setting

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2017-04-21
Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project

Developing a Process Evaluation Tool: Case Study of a Local Community-Based Research Project - Positive Living Positive Homes

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2017-04-12
Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project

Fraser Health Authority Supervised Consumption Site Evaluation Plan

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2017-04-10
Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 

Cultural Brokers: A Strategy for Promoting Health Equity among Newcomer Women

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2017-04-11

Continuity of Care for Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases Among Refugees: Challenges and Opportunities

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2016
Abstract: 

Purpose: To review and document the challenges faced by different stakeholders - refugees, humanitarian organizations and host countries of refugees in accessing and providing continuity of care (management, informational and relational) for chronic non-communicable diseases among refugees. Method: A scoping review of the literature was conducted. Grey literature sources and academic databases such as PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science, PsycINFO, Global Health, ELDIS Gateway to Development Information, Canadian Health Research Collection were searched from January 2006 to July 2016, focusing on refugees (and other key words) and chronic non-communicable diseases. Thematic analysis of the articles was conducted inductively. Results: The search yielded a total of 3,771 articles, of which, 40 articles met the inclusion criteria and were included in the final review. The emergent themes were categorized under the three areas of continuity of care for each stakeholder in the humanitarian context. Some emergent themes or challenges include language barriers, low socio-economic status, lack of sustainable financing and international aid, clinical management failures, competing priorities, low education and literacy levels, lack of research and robust data. An awareness of these challenges provides opportunities for reform of research, policy and clinical practice to ensure the prompt, optimal and sustained care of chronic non-communicable diseases among the refugee population. Conclusion: The findings of this review highlights the interconnected challenges of accessing and providing continuity of care for chronic non-communicable diseases among refugees. Further and more contextualized research of the topic and actions are to be taken to overcome the identified challenges and gaps in order to create a more holistic approach to the effective planning, implementation and delivery of health care services to refugees with chronic non-communicable diseases.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
John O'Neil
Department: 
Health Sciences

Stories through the Camera - A Photovoice Community Health Assessment about the Impacts of Neighbourhood on Chinese Immigrant Older Adults' Health

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2016
Abstract: 

A growing public health literature indicates that neighbourhood environment plays an important role in older adults’ health. However, investigation on neighbourhood health impacts on Chinese immigrant older adults – a growing socially marginalized population in Canada – is currently missing. This study helps to fill this gap by exploring the multiple dimensions on how neighbourhood environmental factors affect Chinese immigrant older adults’ different health aspects. The purpose of this study was to understand Chinese immigrant seniors’ perspectives on healthy and harmful spaces located within their immediate neighbourhood, and the accessibility of these spaces among Chinese older adults. A Photovoice research method was used with 6 Chinese immigrant older adults from a middle-class neighbourhood in Vancouver, Canada. Research findin gs showed that neighbourhood attributes related to the built physical environment, social environment, and public/community service environment affect Chinese older adults’ physical health, diet, mental health, social health, and mobility. This study highlighted the complex interactions between different aspects of neighbourhood factors and Chinese older adults’ agency in obtaining health-benefiting resources. Future studies need to expand the concept of individual health to better understand the different interactive pathways between neighbourhood environmental factors and other health aspects.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Laurie Goldsmith
Department: 
Health Sciences

Indigenous Self-Determination in Health in Guatemala: Lessons from Chile and Canada

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2016-12
Abstract: 

As a response to the poor health conditions that indigenous people experience worldwide, indigenous groups in many countries have demanded increased autonomy and control over health care in hopes of developing more accessible and responsive health services. The purpose of this work is to explore factors required for self-determining indigenous health systems, and consider whether these would work in Guatemala. To accomplish this, a review of the literature was conducted and two examples of indigenous self-determination in health from Chile (Makewe Hospital) and Canada (NAN’s Crisis Teams) were selected. The formation and implementation process of these initiatives was analysed to identify factors that enable indigenous self-determination in health. Factors that would be feasible to replicate in Guatemala include strong community involvement in organizing health care, revalorization and revitalization of indigenous knowledge and culture, leadership capacity, flexibility, and integration of Western and traditional medical systems. 

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Nicole Berry
Department: 
Health Sciences

Using Participatory Methods to Create a Logic Model for Healthiest Babies Possible

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2016-12
Abstract: 

Healthiest Babies Possible (HBP) is a perinatal nutrition program that supports women facing challenging life circumstances in Vancouver and Richmond. The program has existed since 1976 and has undergone multiple changes to its service delivery model. HBP is now embarking on an evaluation that will be used for quality improvement and to identify best practices that can be shared with other service agencies. Stakeholder engagement and participatory methods have led to successful evaluation plans in similar programs. This document focuses on engaging with an Evaluation Stakeholder Workgroup (ESW) consisting of partners, HBP staff, patient advisors, leadership and funders, to create a program logic model. The program logic model is intended to form the basis of a future evaluation plan.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Malcolm Steinberg
Department: 
Health Sciences