Health Sciences - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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Recreational physical activity and brain cancer risk in Canadian adults

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

Brain cancer is a debilitating and lethal form of cancer with little know about its prevention. A population-based case-control study was conducted with 643 histologically confirmed incident brain cancer cases and 3106 population controls aged 20-76 years from seven Canadian provinces to assess the impact of recreational physical activity on brain cancer in 1994-1997. Results of significance were in female subjects only. Compared to female subjects in the lo west respective quartiles of moderate, strenuous and total recreational physical activity, subjects in the highest respective quartiles had multi-variable adjusted odds ratios of 0.52 (95%CI: 0.35-0.79), 0.82 (95% CI: 0.56-1.20), and 0.57 (95% CO: 0.37-0.86). Physical activity particularly benefited women who smoked more than 10 pack-years and those with a body mass index below 25 kg/m2. This study provides further support that physical activity plays an important role in the prevention of disease.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
R
Department: 
Not in list supplied - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project (M.Sc.)

Challenges of tobacco control in low/middle income countries

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

Five million people die annually in the world as a result of tobacco use. One in four of the deaths occur in the Western Pacific Region. Mongolia, one of the 37 member states in the region, is experiencing increased tobacco consumption. In Mongolia, an estimated 67.8% of all men and 25.5 % of women smoke cigarettes. Smoking has become a maj or public health problem in Mongolia. Tobacco-related diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular diseases have become the leading cause of death in the country. The objective of this project is to identify barriers to the effective implementation and enforcement of the Tobacco Control Law. The project was carried out by examining national documents on tobacco and conducting interviews with government officials and representatives of NGOs. Specific recommendations were put forward with regard to issues such as availability, advertising, price and taxation, smoke-free environments, cessation support, and human and financial resources.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
C
Department: 
Not in list supplied - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project (M.Sc.)

Public health improvement and integrated planning in British Columbia

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

Experiences of staff involved in public health improvement in a health authority highlight several barriers and keys to success. Analyzing these experiences with the BC Core Functions Improvement Process and reviewing the literature of other recent initiatives leads to a summary of potential key areas to address public health improvement. This project will explore in detail the key area of integrated planning using information from interviews with public health staff, a public health leadership team meeting, implementation of an integrated planning framework, and the relevant literature. A proposed framework for integrated planning will assist health authorities in successfully implementing public health improvement initiatives, assist the Ministry of Health in their goal of renewing public health services, and move towards an integrated planning and delivery system in public health in British Columbia.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Michael Hayes
Department: 
Faculty of Health Sciences - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project (M.Sc.)

Evaluation of Vancouver Coastal Health's core public health services implementation process

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

The BC Ministry of Health’s 2005 Core Functions Framework responds to the need to enhance public health infrastructure in the region. The Core Functions initiative provides a good opportunity to monitor and evaluate an implementation process. This evaluation is important as it addresses encountered challenges, so that action can ensue to mitigate these challenges, thereby ensuring satisfaction for those involved. The qualitative evaluation conduc ted for the Core Public Health Services Review at Vancouver Coastal Health (VCH) is outlined, findings described, and recommendations presented to improve the implementation process of the Framework. Change management theory is used to support these recommendations. This information can be used to improve and sustain public health interventions that serve to benefit the population’s overall health and well being.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Stephen Corber
Department: 
Faculty of Health Sciences - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project (M.Sc.)

Needs assessment of women with disabilities in the North West province of Cameroon

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

In Cameroon, women have many roles and responsibilities within the household and often outside the home. Having a disability makes the carrying out of daily tasks more difficult for a woman. A needs assessment using focus groups (n= 24 using 2 focus groups) and key informant interviews (n= 12) was conducted to explore the experiences of women living with disabilities in the North West Province. Findings of this qualitative study show that women with disabilities face both physi cal and attitudinal barriers, some live in poverty, most have difficulty getting married, and the majority feel they have a lack of opportunities in gaining an education, finding employment, and forming meaningful social ties. Participants generated ideas on changes that need to be made for the betterment of their lives. Ideas were around increasing empowerment and education, gaining support from family and friends, increasing public awareness, adapting the physical environments, and finding allies.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Kitty Corbett
Department: 
Faculty of Health Sciences - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project (M.Sc.)

The 10/90 gap and deficient research coordination in developing countries: Case study of Mongolia and Mozambique

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

In developing countries, there is a lack of coordination among research groups resulting in insufficient harmonization of research projects. This leads to duplicated and neglected areas of research. This paper will discuss the 10/90 gap and apply it to case studies from Mongolia and Mozambique to illustrate the general public health research situation in developing countries and the effects of inadequate research coordination. The major problem for Mongolia is that there is no efficient network for research coordination. In Mozambique, the major problem is that there is an overall lack of demand for research by policy makers resulting in uncoordinated research without benefits for the population. If research coordination is improved in developing countries, the efficiency and efficacy of research will increase and better policies can be developed. Ultimately, effective strengthening of national health research systems will improve the health of the population.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Craig Janes
Department: 
Faculty of Health Sciences - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project (M.Sc.)