Health Sciences - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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Needs assessment of women with disabilities in the North West province of Cameroon

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

In Cameroon, women have many roles and responsibilities within the household and often outside the home. Having a disability makes the carrying out of daily tasks more difficult for a woman. A needs assessment using focus groups (n= 24 using 2 focus groups) and key informant interviews (n= 12) was conducted to explore the experiences of women living with disabilities in the North West Province. Findings of this qualitative study show that women with disabilities face both physi cal and attitudinal barriers, some live in poverty, most have difficulty getting married, and the majority feel they have a lack of opportunities in gaining an education, finding employment, and forming meaningful social ties. Participants generated ideas on changes that need to be made for the betterment of their lives. Ideas were around increasing empowerment and education, gaining support from family and friends, increasing public awareness, adapting the physical environments, and finding allies.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Kitty Corbett
Department: 
Faculty of Health Sciences - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project (M.Sc.)

The 10/90 gap and deficient research coordination in developing countries: Case study of Mongolia and Mozambique

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

In developing countries, there is a lack of coordination among research groups resulting in insufficient harmonization of research projects. This leads to duplicated and neglected areas of research. This paper will discuss the 10/90 gap and apply it to case studies from Mongolia and Mozambique to illustrate the general public health research situation in developing countries and the effects of inadequate research coordination. The major problem for Mongolia is that there is no efficient network for research coordination. In Mozambique, the major problem is that there is an overall lack of demand for research by policy makers resulting in uncoordinated research without benefits for the population. If research coordination is improved in developing countries, the efficiency and efficacy of research will increase and better policies can be developed. Ultimately, effective strengthening of national health research systems will improve the health of the population.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Craig Janes
Department: 
Faculty of Health Sciences - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project (M.Sc.)