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Getting to “Yes”: Overcoming Client Reluctance to Engage in Chair Work

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2020-10-06
Abstract: 

Goals: Securing clients’ active and enthusiastic collaboration to participate in activities therapists would like to implement in therapy (e.g., free association, in vivo exposure, or the engagement in chair work) is a core mission in therapy. However, from the clients’ perspective, these tasks frequently represent novel challenges that can trigger anxiety and reluctance. Thus, a key element in therapy is the negotiation between therapist and client to move beyond such reluctance to potentially effective therapy activities and, at the same time, maintain positive relational affiliation between therapist and client. In this research we examined (1) a collection of therapist proposal/client response sequences that were geared toward recruiting participation in chair work and (2) sequences containing hesitation or instances where decisions to engage in chair work were deferred and related relational disaffiliation. Our goal was to identify the conversational resources (both verbal and non-verbal) that worked to reject a proposed activity (or convey impending rejection) and examine the interactional practices directed at resolving client reluctance.

Method: We used the conceptual and methodological resources of Conversation Analysis to examine a corpus of proposal/response sequences that targeted chair work entry in Emotion-focused Therapy.

Results: The resulting data set included some smooth and successful engagements and others more challenging, involving clients delaying or resisting engagement with chair work. Clients were found to defer or refuse engagement through a range of resources such as withholding a response (silence), questioning the authenticity of the task, or directly refusing. We identified specific therapist practices that facilitated engagement in “refusal-implicative” contexts such as proffering “or” alternatives, offering extended rationales for the activity (accounting), and elaborating on the proposals. We observed that the therapists’ deontic stance (mitigated and reduced claims to authority) and moderated epistemic positioning (deference to the client’s primacy of knowledge and information) played an important role in facilitating engagement.

Conclusion: Our research highlights the kinds of interactional sequences in which clients and therapists are able to achieve alignment in mutually working toward chair work entry. Based on these observations, we offer some practical advice to therapists in formulating proposals to engage clients during in-therapy work.

Document type: 
Article
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Conceptualizing Imagination in the Context of School Leadership

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2020-09-10
Abstract: 

There is very little research on imagination in the context of leadership in general, and even less in relation to educational leadership. Drawing on available research on imagination in leadership and scholarship in the field of imagination, this qualitative content analysis seeks to add to foundational understanding of imagination’s role in educational leadership. First, it describes the range of meanings leaders hold about imagination and the contradictory feelings these meanings create. Second, it indicates some of the varied ways in which imagination contributes to leadership. Third, it contributes a definition of imagination that encompasses the potential value of imagination for leadership now and into the future. The paper concludes by offering recommendations for future research and identifies the improvisational imagination as an additional feature that imagination contributes to leadership practices. The research shows that imagination is not something we should call on only in times of crisis, but, rather, that it is an indispensable ally in dealing with leadership challenges of all kinds.

Document type: 
Article

Unleashing the elephant out of the closet and into the wildness of inner work

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2020
Abstract: 

In this chapter, the authors explore the “hidden curriculum” that is enactedwhen the teaching-self transmits to the learning-self, the being aspects of theteacher. It is proposed that these aspects are communicated through discursiveand nondiscursive materials. The latter includes energetic, emotional, andgestural “languages.” An argument is made that the current, modernist conceptionsand practices of education that predominantly focus on covering anddownloading curriculum materials do not create openings for exploring thebeing aspects of teachers and learners. Moreover, acknowledging AvrahamCohen’s thesis, “We teach who we are, and that’s the problem,” the authorsexplore the hurtful and damaging influence of the teachers’ “Shadow materials.”An argument is made for the moral imperative of teachers’ (or anyonewho is in a position of influencing others) self-study to minimize or preventhurtful and damaging influences that could have a long-lasting impact on thestudents’ or learners’ self-formation. The authors propose the method of innerwork, integrated with contemplative inquiry and practices, as a way for educatorsto work with the materials of consciousness. Inner work largely involvesworking through psychological projections, introjections, and entanglementsthat permeate one’s inner world. Some details of inner work are offered,including how to facilitate a dialogue between the parts or subselves in one’sinner world that are in tension and conflict. It has been further proposed that this kind of inner work would lay the necessary foundation for becomingkinder, caring, and more compassionate human beings.

Document type: 
Book chapter

Recalibration of post modernism with earth in mind

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2018
Document type: 
Article

Contemplating philosophy of education: A Canadian west coast perspective

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2020
Abstract: 

Starting with an assertion that philosophy’s prerogative is to propose alternative worldviews and values, in addition to the basic interpretation of philosophy as an inquiry into the myriad dimensions of human experience, this paper proffers a view of education that centers the cultivation of a more balanced and integrated humanity in resistance to the increasing instrumental forces in modern societies that fragment, alienate, and therefore dehumanize. Distinguishing between education (primarily concerned with the human being) and instruction (primarily concerned with the human having), this paper is primarily concerned with education, and it proposes a contemplative mode of intersubjective relationality between the self and self-other. A variety of critical observational and interpretive notes are offered on major concepts that animate contemporary discourses in education, such as dualisms, imbalance and fragmentation, dislocation and alienation, progress, and existential crisis, all refracted through the prism of the most recent contemplative turn in education. The chapter ends with a curated dialogue among the four authors of this chapter, all of whom share how they have come to situate themselves in the intersection of philosophy of education and contemplative inquiry and how they see the nature of contribution that the latter makes to the former.

Document type: 
Book chapter

Pedagogical infusion of the contemplative: SFU's Contemplative Inquiry Master's of Education Program in Canada

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2019
Abstract: 

This chapter narrates a design story behind creating a graduate program that thematizes contemplative inquiry and practice as a pedagogic modality. It also offers a critical examination by the founding faculty of the program on what is understood as contemplative education. Finally, it details some of the key findings of student experience pertaining to the program. As a whole, this chapter is offered as an illuminating, and hopefully instructive, tale of one Canadian contemplative education graduate program in the context of a Master’s program.

Document type: 
Book chapter

Awareness, Policy, Privacy, and More: Post-Secondary Students Voice Their Solutions to Cyberbullying

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2020-08-20
Abstract: 

This paper discusses solutions to cyberbullying posed by post-secondary students from four Canadian universities. The qualitative data used in this analysis were drawn from one open-ended question on an online student survey completed by 1458 undergraduate students, as well as 10 focus group transcripts involving a total of 36 students. Seven key themes emerged: awareness and education; policy; protecting one’s privacy; technology-based solutions; empowering better choices and responses; university culture; and disciplinary measures. The findings show that post-secondary institutions need to make preventing and curtailing cyberbullying more of a priority within their campus communities, including engaging in responsive consultation with key stakeholder groups, such as students, to develop meaningful solutions.

Document type: 
Article
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An Approach to Minimize Atmospheric Correction Error and Improve Physics-Based Satellite-Derived Bathymetry in a Coastal Environment

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2020-08-25
Abstract: 

Physics-based radiative transfer model (RTM) inversion methods have been developed and implemented for satellite-derived bathymetry (SDB); however, precise atmospheric correction (AC) is required for robust bathymetry retrieval. In a previous study, we revealed that biases from AC may be related to imaging and environmental factors that are not considered sufficiently in all AC algorithms. Thus, the main aim of this study is to demonstrate how AC biases related to environmental factors can be minimized to improve SDB results. To achieve this, we first tested a physics-based inversion method to estimate bathymetry for a nearshore area in the Florida Keys, USA. Using a freely available water-based AC algorithm (ACOLITE), we used Landsat 8 (L8) images to derive per-pixel remote sensing reflectances, from which bathymetry was subsequently estimated. Then, we quantified known biases in the AC using a linear regression that estimated bias as a function of imaging and environmental factors and applied a correction to produce a new set of remote sensing reflectances. This correction improved bathymetry estimates for eight of the nine scenes we tested, with the resulting changes in bathymetry RMSE ranging from +0.09 m (worse) to −0.48 m (better) for a 1 to 25 m depth range, and from +0.07 m (worse) to −0.46 m (better) for an approximately 1 to 16 m depth range. In addition, we showed that an ensemble approach based on multiple images, with acquisitions ranging from optimal to sub-optimal conditions, can be used to estimate bathymetry with a result that is similar to what can be obtained from the best individual scene. This approach can reduce time spent on the pre-screening and filtering of scenes. The correction method implemented in this study is not a complete solution to the challenge of AC for satellite-derived bathymetry, but it can eliminate the effects of biases inherent to individual AC algorithms and thus improve bathymetry retrieval. It may also be beneficial for use with other AC algorithms and for the estimation of seafloor habitat and water quality products, although further validation in different nearshore waters is required.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Cooking a Pot of Beef Stew: Navigating Through Difficult Times Through Slow Philosophy

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2020-07-15
Abstract: 

The Slow Movement offers feminist scholars permission to inhabit multiple identities and recognizes the inherent value of care work as work. Against an intimate living backdrop of pancreatic cancer, COVID-19, and overwork, I practice Slow scholarship by embodied caring for three elders while experiencing powerful anxiety. Identifying as a daughter, mother, carer, student, friend, leader, and scholar, I look to a variety of wisdom sources outside universal concepts of value and time to ground myself in the present. Zen, Taoism, and existentialism suggest staying with anxiety as a viable means to live in an uncomfortable present.

Document type: 
Article
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Talking Back: Trans Youth and Resilience in Action

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2020-05-12
Abstract: 

In 2015 the Gender Vectors research team received a major research grant to conduct research with and about trans-gender youth in the Greater Vancouver Area. A unique aspect of this research project involved combining social action research with the development of a prototype of a video game as a knowledge translation tool to depict the life experiences of trans youth. We draw on transformative gender just-ice theory to document and address the diminished life chances of and the need to promote resilience among trans youth in the region and more broadly, across Canada and the United States. This article provides an overview of the research project and concludes by identifying key insights relating to resiliency that resulted from 15 narrative interviews with trans-gender youth, focus group meetings with the Project’s Youth Advisory  Council,  and  dialog  from  an inter-generational workshop  for  transgender  youth  and  adult care/service providers and allies. These themes informed the creation of the prototype.

Document type: 
Article