Archaeology, Department of

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Modelling Nuu-chah-nulth land use : the cultural landscape of Clayoquot Sound

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2003
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Theses (Dept. of Archaeology) / Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

Plant delta 15N: A new archaeological tool

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

This empirical study was undertaken to test the unlikely postulate that past human activity has left an imprint on the stable nitrogen isotopic ratio of the plants currently growing on archaeological sites. In each of three summers, plants were taken from a variety of defined features at Norse and Thule sites in southwest Greenland. The data obtained clearly establish the effect of past human activity on the 15N of modern plants. Despite the sites being in widely separated regions and of varying ages, the plants from each had si gnificantly higher 15N values than those growing on the surrounding natural terrain. The unusual values were directly correlated to defined activity areas and the isotopic effect was measured at the metre scale. The magnitudes of the values observed within each context were consistent with the expected delta 15N of the various nitrogen sources deposited at these locales in the past, indicating the very strong conservation of the isotopic composition of the anthropogenically introduced nitrogen. These observations show that plant delta 15N can be used as a new, non-invasive tool to identify and delineate ancient human activity, and to some extent to characterize that activity based on the magnitude of the signature. Whereas more study is needed to fully realize both the potential and the limitations of the tool, the data obtained provide a basic framework for future application. The usefulness of the tool is already demonstrated by the important information obtained for Norse farming practices in Greenland. Continued study of t he phenomenon will likely provide many applications in archaeology and perhaps will be of interest to other disciplines.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
D
Department: 
Dept. of Archaeology - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (Ph.D.)

What's the point? A morphological study of small bone points from Nuu-chah-nulth territory, Vancouver Island, B.C.

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

Small bone points are abundant in midden sites on the southwest coast of Vancouver Island suggesting that fishing was a frequent activity. However, links between point morphology and specific fishing activities are tenuous. This thesis critically examines the functional interpretation of small bone points using ethnographic sources, existing collections, use wear, and morphological data. I use eighteen subjective categories to describe the morphological variation in small bone points. I document the intra-category variation and overlap between categories using quantitative analyses. By identifying and analysing these eighteen morphological categories, I highlight potentially meaningful variations in the assemblages. I conclude that describing and exploring the variation within subjective types will increase the consistency of future typological analyses.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
D
Department: 
Dept. of Archaeology - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

Biomechanics of the hominine cranium with speical reference to Homo erectus and the archaic Homo sapiens

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1991
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Theses (Dept. of Archaeology) / Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (Ph.D.)

The Concepcion Convent of Cuenca, Ecuador : examining gender, class, and economy in a Latin American convent

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2003
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Theses (Dept. of Archaeology) / Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

The paleoindian fluted point, dart or spear armature? : the identification of paleoindian delivery technology through the analysis of lithic fracture velocity

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1997
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Theses (Dept. of Archaeology) / Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (Ph.D.)

Prehistoric diet in central Baja California, Mexico

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1997
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Theses (Dept. of Archaeology) / Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

The prehistoric use of nephrite on the British Columbia plateau

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1996
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Theses (Dept. of Archaeology) / Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

Out of sight, out of mind : the reposition of archaeological collections in Canada

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1996
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Theses (Dept. of Archaeology) / Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (Ph.D.)

The prevalence and timing of enamel hypoplasia in the Bonobo, Pan paniscus [Coolidge, 1933]

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2003
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Theses (Dept. of Archaeology) / Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)