Archaeology, Department of

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Stone artifacts from the Punchaw Lake site (area C) : a late prehistoric occupation in Central British Columbia

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1978
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Simon Fraser University. Theses (Dept. of Archaeology)
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

The archaeology of the Belcarra Park site : a contribution to Strait of Georgia prehistory

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1977
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Simon Fraser University. Theses (Dept. of Archaeology)
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

A linguistic and ethnohistoric approach to Bella Coola prehistory. --

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1973
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Simon Fraser University. Theses (Dept. of Archaeology)
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

The comparison of lithics at three sites in the East Kootenay area of British Columbia

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1977
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Simon Fraser University. Theses (Dept. of Archaeology)
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

Save me a drumstick : molecular taphonomy, differential preservation and ancient DNA from the Kingdom of Tonga

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2004
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Theses (Dept. of Archaeology) / Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

Feather Barbs as a Good Source of mtDNA for Bird Species Identification in Forensic Wildlife Investigations

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011
Abstract: 

Background: The ability to accurately identify bird species is crucial for wildlife law enforcement and bird-strikeinvestigations. However, such identifications may be challenging when only partial or damaged feathers areavailable for analysis.Results: By applying vigorous contamination controls and sensitive PCR amplification protocols, we found that itwas feasible to obtain accurate mitochondrial (mt)DNA-based species identification with as few as two featherbarbs. This minimally destructive DNA approach was successfully used and tested on a variety of bird species,including North American wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), blue heron (Ardeaherodias) and pygmy owl (Glaucidium californicum). The mtDNA was successfully obtained from ‘fresh’ feathers,historic museum specimens and archaeological samples, demonstrating the sensitivity and versatility of thistechnique.Conclusions: By applying appropriate contamination controls, sufficient quantities of mtDNA can be reliablyrecovered and analyzed from feather barbs. This previously overlooked substrate provides new opportunities foraccurate DNA species identification when minimal feather samples are available for forensic analysis.

Document type: 
Article

Taphonomic Signatures of Bald Eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) on Avian Prey Bones from Boundary Bay, British Columbia, Canada

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

This study investigated the damage that bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) left on an accumulation of waterfowl bones in Boundary Bay, British Columbia. Avian sterna were identified quantitatively and qualitatively to the species level, most belonging to the order Anseriformes, family Anatidae. We suggest that avian sterna with large puncture holes, sharp breaks, bone flakes, cracks and jagged margins are identifiable and diagnostic to eagle feeding. This is relevant to archaeological situations where raptor-produced bone dumps could be confused with anthropogenic refuse middens. The study has two main results: 1) determination of species composition of kills from an eagle-produced bone dump and 2) description and quantification of the frequency and type of raptorial predator damage to the sterna of the avian prey.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Tracing the First Steps of American Sturgeon Pioneers in Europe

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

Background: A Baltic population of Atlantic sturgeon was founded ~1,200 years ago by migrantsfrom North America, but after centuries of persistence, the population was extirpated in the 1960s,mainly as a result of over-harvest and habitat alterations. As there are four genetically distinctgroups of Atlantic sturgeon inhabiting North American rivers today, we investigated the geneticprovenance of the historic Baltic population by ancient DNA analyses using mitochondrial andnuclear markers.Results: The phylogeographic signal obtained from multilocus microsatellite DNA genotypes andmitochondrial DNA control region haplotypes, when compared to existing baseline datasets fromextant populations, allowed for the identification of the region-of-origin of the North AmericanAtlantic sturgeon founders. Moreover, statistical and simulation analyses of the multilocusgenotypes allowed for the calculation of the effective number of individuals that originally foundedthe European population of Atlantic sturgeon. Our findings suggest that the Baltic population of A.oxyrinchus descended from a relatively small number of founders originating from the northernextent of the species' range in North America.Conclusion: These results demonstrate that the most northerly distributed North American A.oxyrinchus colonized the Baltic Sea ~1,200 years ago, suggesting that Canadian specimens should bethe primary source of broodstock used for restoration in Baltic rivers. This study illustrates thegreat potential of patterns obtained from ancient DNA to identify population-of-origin toinvestigate historic genotype structure of extinct populations.

Document type: 
Article

Coxoh Data Set

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2004-08-05
Abstract: 

The Coxoh Ethnoarchaelogical Project sought to establish material culture links between the now-extinct Coxoh and modern Maya groups in the area.

Document type: 
Dataset