Simon Fraser University Gerontology Research Centre

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Towards more elder friendly acute hospitals : study 1 : the physical environment in ACE units : design specifics and staff ratings - final report

Date created: 
2006
Abstract: 

Report submitted to: Fraser Health Geriatric Clinical Service Planning and Delivery Team, January 17, 2006. Three facts about seniors are well known: (1) their numbers and proportion in the population served by the Fraser Health Authority (FHAA), the province and the country are increasing; (2) they constitute a substantial proportion of the inpatient hospital population, it has, in fact, been estimated that in most jurisdictions nationally and internationally, they may constitute the majority in medical and surgical wards other than pediatrics or obstetrics/gynecology; (3) a third fact is that substantial proportions of seniors have accidents in hospitals and/or lose functional status between admission and discharge at a rate above and beyond what is to be expected from their admitting diagnosis. While there may be various contributing factors, the focus of the study described in this report, and the broader project of which it is a part, is on the physical environment. A key question is whether there are aspects of the physical environment of hospitals, and in particular, interior design of patient private and public areas, that can be altered in ways that will improve older patient outcomes.

Document type: 
Technical Report
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The Alzheimers project : A natural experiment in fully-challenged aging. Strangers among us: A play about love and time and memory.

Author: 
Date created: 
1998
Abstract: 

This report was commissioned by the Western Gold Theatre Society to examine audience response to the play "Strangers among us: A play about love and time and memory." The primary purpose of the project was to serve as a catalyst for I bringing Alzheimers Disease forward for discussion and exploration. Specific objectives were: (1) To showcase fully-challenged senior actors, thus attacking the myths and stereotypes of declining ability with age; (2) To educate the public about Alzheimers Disease, i.e., to demystify the disease, thus reducing fear; (3) To raise public awareness of the impact of the disease on its victims and their families; (4) To provide a healing experience for those touched by the disease and to share the burden of care; and (5) To entertain.

Document type: 
Book
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Survey of Canadian homesharing agencies serving the elderly

Date created: 
1989
Abstract: 

Homesharing is a living arrangement in which two or more unrelated persons occupy a single dwelling, each having some private space but sharing common areas such as kitchen, bathroom and living room. This report describes findings from a study which examined the objectives, services, operational characteristics and clientele of 18 Canadian agencies which help older persons to make suitable homesharing arrangements.

Document type: 
Book
File(s): 

Special care units for dementia : staff and family perceptions : report of a study undertaken for the Pacific Health Care Society

Date created: 
1989
Abstract: 

The study described in this report and the literature review of the environmental design, programming and staffing needs of dementia victims in institutions that preceded it (Gutman, 1989) were undertaken to provide the Pacific Health Care Society with information that would assist it in evaluating the need for and feasibility of expanding its service to include a Special Care Unit.

Document type: 
Book
File(s): 

Psychogeriatric client identification project : phase 1 - final report

Date created: 
1995
Abstract: 

The Psychogeriatric Client Identification Project, contracted by the Continuing Care Division and conducted by the Gerontology Research Centre at Simon Fraser University, provides a comprehensive description of the diverse client groups that are typically included under the umbrella term, "psychogeriatric." Traditionally, psychogeriatric clients have been categorized according to medical diagnoses. The current research project adopted a different approach to identifying client needs by using an inclusive definition of the psychogeriatric population and by describing clients in relation to both behavioural characteristics and diagnosis. The focus of the project was on identifying the unique characteristics, behaviours and corresponding needs of client subgroups for the purpose of planning and delivering appropriate services. The specific project objectives were to: 1. describe the characteristics of the various psychogeriatric subgroups, with particular emphasis on behaviours that pose significant care and management challenges within facility and community settings; 2. summarize statistical information on prevalence and projected numbers for British Columbia for the various subgroups; and 3. identify the availability of a model of psychogeriatric care and services that could be applied to policy development and resource planning.Table of Contents: Executive Summary; INTRODUCTION 1: A. Background and Project Objectives; B. Definition of Terms and Behavioural Classification Scheme; C. Report Organization. LITERATURE REVIEW & EPIDEMIOLOGIC/STATISTICAL DATA: A. Introduction; B. PART 1 - Problem Behaviours; Multi-Category Studies: Community; Multi-Category Studies: Institution; Agitated! Aggressive Behaviour; Physical; Verbal; Agitated/Non-Aggressive-Physical; Agitated/Non-Aggressive-Verbal; Ideational; Emotional/Affective Disturbance; Socially Unacceptable Behaviour; Problematic ADLs/Coping Strategies. C. PART 2 - Client Identification by Psychiatric Diagnosis: Prevalence of Psychiatric Disorders: Dementia; Delirium; Mood Disorders; Anxiety Disorders; Schizophrenia and Paranoia; Substance Dependence/Abuse. D. Summary and Conclusions. CONSULTATION PROCESS: A. Research Design/Methods; B. The Sample: Key Informant Survey Participants; Focus Group Participants; C. Data Collection and Analysis. IV RESEARCH FINDINGS: Key Informant Survey: A. Characteristics of Survey Respondents; B. Agency Characteristics; C. Description of Client Characteristics/Behavioural Disturbances and Service Response; D. Most Problematic Client Behaviours; E. Assessment of Facility and Community-Based Resources/Needs; F. Description of Behavioural Disturbance Categories/Groupings; G. Behavioural Disturbance Frequency Ratings; H. Behavioural Disturbance Difficulty Ratings; I. Behaviour Management Difficulty Ratings; J. Specialized Programs/Approaches and Suggested Improvements; K. Utility of Behavioural Classification Scheme; L. Suggested Program Improvements; Focus Group Sessions; M. Summary of Focus Group Results: BC Caregivers' Support Group; Frontline Direct Care Nursing Staff. V CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS: A. BC Prevalence Estimates by Diagnoses; B. Recommendations Related to Client Subgroups and Resource Needs; C. Recommendations for Future Study. REFERENCES; APPENDICES

Document type: 
Book
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Rethinking retirement

Date created: 
1995
Abstract: 

Four of the seven chapters in this volume are based on papers originally presented at the 6th Annual John K. Friesen Lecture Series in Gerontology held at Simon Fraser University April 3-4, 1995. The impetus for the symposium and the volume was provided by the profound changes that are taking place in Canada and throughout the developed world in the way retirement is being conceptualized, timed, and reflected in corporate and public policy.' A systematic examination of these changes seemed warranted.TABLE OF CONTENTS: 1. Introduction. 2. Population Aging: A Contested Terrain of Social Policy/ Ellen M. Gee; 3. Rethinking Retirement: Issues for the Twenty-First Century / Victor W. Marshall; 4. The Older Worker in Canadian Society: Is There a Future? / Victor W Marshall; 5. Security for Social Security - Raise the Age of Entitlement? / Robert L. Brown; 6. Work, Retirement and Women in Later Life / Susan A. McDaniel; 7. Women's Retirement: Shifting Ground / Lynne MacFadgen and Lillian Zimmerman.

Document type: 
Book
File(s): 

Shelter and care of persons with dementia

Author: 
Date created: 
1992
Abstract: 

TABLE OF CONTENTS: INTRODUCTION; PART I: SPECIALIZED CARE IN INSTITUTIONAL SETTINGS: 1. Basic Facts and Figures about Dementia Patients in Institutions / Kimberley L. McEwan, David Maxwell and Gloria M. Gutman; 2. Characteristics of Six Special Care Units in British Columbia / Gloria M. Gutman and Judy Killam; 3. Comparison of Care Practices for Persons with Dementia Living on and Outside Special Care Units in Ontario's Homes for the Aged / Darlene Flett and Christine K Davis; 4. Le Chez Nous : Accommodation with a Difference for Cognitively Impaired Persons in Rural Manitoba / Ulysses Lahaie and Jacqueline Theroux. PART II: BEHAVIOURAL INTERVENTIONS AND ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN ISSUES: 5. Non-pharmacological Approaches to Management of Patient Behaviour: A Focus on Behavioural Intervention for Depression in Dementia / Linda Teri; 6. Behaviour and Use of Space by Residents of Special Care and Integrated Nursing Home Units / Allen R. Dobbs and Brendan G. Rule; 7. Wandering Tracks: Environmental Strategies That May Work Too Well / Doris L. Milke; 8. Designing Facilities for People with Dementia: A New Resource for Planners and Caregivers / Thomas J. Lips. PART III: INSTITUTION - COMMUNITY COOPERATION AND COLLABORATION: 9. The Organization and Coordination of Psychiatric Services for the Elderly in an Urban Setting / Kenneth I. Shulman and Carole A Cohen; 10. Organization and Coordination of Services to Individuals with Dementia Living in Rural Settings / Connie J. Sarchuk and Peter Wiebe; 11. The Bethania Special Care Resource Team / L Craig Turner and Barbara J. Graham. PART IV: FACILITATING SHELTER AND CARE AT HOME: 12. Adapting the Home to Meet the Needs of Persons with Dementia and Their Family Caregivers / Nancy Gnaedinger; 13. The Alzheimers' Family Care Centre - Daycare with a Difference / Laurie-Anne Keith and Deborah Rutman; 14. Respite Care: What Are the Options? / DouglasH. Rapeije.

Document type: 
Book
File(s): 

Progressive accommodation for seniors : interfacing shelter and services

Date created: 
1994
Abstract: 

The purpose of this book is to explore the reasons why clients, agencies and governments are considering options that blend shelter and care, the barriers impeding their development and how these have or may be overcome at both the policy and the practice level. New ways of measuring person-environment fit and the potential of maximizing it via enabling technologies are also examined. The target readership includes researchers, architects, policy makers, developers, care providers and operators of existing seniors housing, all of whom can benefit from a better understanding of the multiple issues involved in interfacing shelter and services.TABLE OF CONTENTS: Introduction / Gloria M. Gutman and Andrew V. Wister; Part I: Changing Clients, Economics and Expectations in Housing for Seniors: Chapter 1- Current Demographics and Living Arrangements of Canada's Elderly / Gordon E. Priest; Chapter 2- Choice, Control, and the Right to Age in Place / Veronica Doyle. Part II: Problems in Providing Service within Existing Seniors Housing: Chapter 3- Current Realities and Challenges in Providing Services to Seniors: The Home Care Perspective / Lois Borden and Joan McGregor; Chapter 4 - Difficulties in Providing Support Services in Buildings Constructed Under Shelter-Only Housing Policies / Reg Appleyard. Part III: Transcending Barriers to Combining Shelter and Services: Chapter 5- Public, Private and Non-Profit Partnerships: The CCPPPH Link / C.W. Lusk; Chapter 6- Group Homes: The Swedish Model of Care for Persons with Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type / Elaine Gallagher; Chapter 7- Supportive Housing for Elderly Persons in Ontario / Garry Baker; Chapter 8- Social Policy Models for Shelter and Services: An International Perspective / Satya Brink. Part IV: Measuring and Maximizing Person-Environment Fit: Chapter 9- Measuring Person-Environment Fit Among Frail Older Adults Using Video / Andrew V. Wister and James R. Watzke; Chapter 10- Assessing the Client's Perception of Person-Environment Fit Using the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure / Anne Carswell. Part V: Enabling Technologies in Housing for Seniors: Chapter 11- Personal Response Systems: Canadian Data on Subscribers and Alarms / James R. Watzke; Chapter 12- Older Adults' Response to Automated Environmental Control Devices / James R. Watzke and Gary Birch; Chapter 13- Use and Potential Use of Assistive Devices by Home-Based Seniors / William C. Mann; Chapter 14 - Necessary Elements of a Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Technical Aids for the Elderly / George Abrahamsohn, Gloria M. Gutman and Andrew V. Wister; Chapter 15- Bridging the Technology Gap - The Links Between Research, Development, Production and Policy for Products Supporting Independent Living / Satya Brink

Document type: 
Book
File(s): 

Non-biomedical aspects of Alzheimers Disease and related disorders : a comprehensive bibliography, 1960-1988

Date created: 
1988
Abstract: 

This bibliography includes references to over 1600 books, articles, theses and dissertations published in English from 1960 to 1988. Emphasis is given to works dealing with non-biomedical aspects of dementia, particularly to research concerned with the development and evaluation of programs, facilities and services designed to enhance the functional status and quality of life of Alzheimer's victims and their caregivers. Bibliography Arrangement: Following an overview chapter concerned with review articles(Chapter 1), references are arranged topically into twelve subject groupings: Symptoms, Assessment and Diagnosis (Chapter 2); Stages of Deterioration (Chapter 3); Case Studies (Chapter 4); Epidemiology (Chapter 5); Pre-Dementia History (Chapter 6); Etiology (Chapter 7); Health Care System (Chapter 8); Treatment and Management (Chapter 9); Environmental Design (Chapter 10); Caregiver Support (Chapter 11); Education (Chapter 12); and Legal, Ethical and Research Issues (Chapter 13).

Document type: 
Book
File(s): 

Mental fitness pilot project : a summary report

Date created: 
1996
Abstract: 

During the past five years, Century House has played a leadership role in supporting innovative community research projects in the area of lifelong learning for seniors, culminating in the mental fitness pilot project. Research and development work is divided into three phases: Phase I - Lifelong Learning Project (Needs Assessment); Phase II - Mental Fitness Research Project; Phase III - Mental Fitness Pilot Program. During this third phase, the consultants' task was to develop, facilitate, and evaluate a series of 8 intensive all-day mental fitness workshops based on the components of mental fitness as outlined in the mental fitness research project; subsequently to offer a series of half-day workshops to introduce a second group of people to the fundamentals of mental fitness. This report focuses on the 8-week series of all-day workshops and provides an outline of the sessions, captures topics of interest, and recommends future directions for programming of a practical nature (e.g., memory skills) to help people keep mentally fit for life. Every attempt has been made to capture the experiences and voices of participants (actual quotes are italicized). The goal of the mental fitness program is a healthy mind in a healthy body. Objectives were: (1) to develop knowledge and skills of mental fitness; (2) to promote the attitudes of mental fitness (optimism, flexibility, confidence, self-esteem); and (3) to promote healthy lifestyles that sustain mental fitness.

Document type: 
Book
File(s):