Simon Fraser University Gerontology Research Centre

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Impact of climate change on the most vulnerable of older populations - 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference - Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming (2011)

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-05
Abstract: 

This video clip comprises the three presentations of Panel Session 1, “Defining the Issues: Climate Science, Health and Gerontological Perspectives” held at the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming," MAY 25-26, 2011, Vancouver, BC. Dr. George Tokesky " Impact of climate change on the most vulnerable of older populations" - As the population ages, changes in the world’s climate and an increase in weather-related events will affect more and more older persons. Within the aging population, the most vulnerable group is the frail elderly that require some level of care and support to remain in the community. This presentation will focus on what happens when a disaster impacts the frail elderly and the health care system designed to care for them. This presentation looks at various health care models and the challenges associated with providing care to the frailest of older persons before, during and after a major disaster. Finally, this presentation will discuss the lessons learned from nine major disasters that led to changes to the way health care is provided to frail elders during a catastrophic event.

 

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

 

See webpage for more information on the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference: http://www.sfu.ca/grc/friesen/friesen2011/

Document type: 
Video

Global aging: Key elements of the demographic transition - 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference - Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming (2011)

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-05
Abstract: 

This video clip comprises the three presentations of Panel Session 1, “Defining the Issues: Climate Science, Health and Gerontological Perspectives” held at the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming," MAY 25-26, 2011, Vancouver, BC. Dr. Gloria Gutman " Global aging: Key elements of the demographic transition" - Population aging is happening worldwide, and at unprecedented speed in the developing world. It occurs when there are two simultaneous trends: increasing life expectancy and declining fertility. But older people are not a homogeneous group. Gerontologists distinguish between the young-old (age 65-74), middle-old (75-84), older-old (85-99) and very-old (100+). While age is only a rough predictor of health, functional status and life-style, there are between age group differences that have implications for physiological and psychological reaction to climate change and ability to cope with it. This presentation will include a description of the sex distribution, housing and living arrangements, education, socio-economic status, social support, mobility, functional status and “techno-savvy” of today’s and tomorrow’s 65+ population – key variables to consider when discussing mitigation and adaptation to climate change. Also key to consider are other global trends occurring simultaneously with population ageing such as migration, urbanization and the recent economic downturn.

 

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

 

See webpage for more information on the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference: http://www.sfu.ca/grc/friesen/friesen2011/

Document type: 
Video

Climate change and the threat to an aging population - 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference - Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming (2011)

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-05
Abstract: 

This video clip comprises the three presentations of Panel Session 1, “Defining the Issues: Climate Science, Health and Gerontological Perspectives” held at the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming," MAY 25-26, 2011, Vancouver, BC. Dr. John Stone "Climate change and the threat to an aging population" - This talk will explore the science of climate change and its implications for an aging population. It will explain why climate change is a broad threat to society, the economy and the environment; and how the climate is likely to change focussing on the increase in the frequency and severity of extreme weather and climate events which are a particular threat to older people.

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

See webpage for more information on the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference: http://www.sfu.ca/grc/friesen/friesen2011/

Document type: 
Video

Age of climate change: Opportunities and risks of climate change for an ageing population - 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference - Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming (2011)

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-05
Abstract: 

This video clip is the third Keynote address to the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming," MAY 25-26, 2011, Vancouver, BC. Climate change and an ageing population bring together key policy challenges which need to be addressed to ensure a safe, secure, equitable and sustainable future. This Keynote presentation will examine older people as Contributor, Casualty and Champion of climate change. It will discuss the social, environmental and economic dynamics that determine vulnerability and resilience of older demographic groups. It will outline the need for a coherent policy response that addresses the interface between climate change and older people. One that harnesses the contribution older people can make to addressing climate threats, while reducing the vulnerability of older people ensuring they reach later life with greater resilience.

 

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

 

See webpage for more information on the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference: http://www.sfu.ca/grc/friesen/friesen2011/

Document type: 
Video

Climate change and health of an aging Canadian population: Adaptation frameworks and strategies for risk reduction - 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference - Growing Old in a Changing Climate: (2011)

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-05
Abstract: 

This video clip is the second Keynote address to the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming," MAY 25-26, 2011, Vancouver, BC. Climate change is expected to increase risks to the health and well-being of people living in Canada and around the world through impacts on physical, economic and social environments. Seniors can be particularly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change because of physiological sensitivities to a range of hazards, existing perceptions of health threats, and capacity challenges at the individual or community level which make adaptation difficult. Important strides have been made in efforts to prepare seniors for more frequent disasters and in efforts to make communities healthier and more resilient in the face of a changing climate. Addressing growing health risks from climate change will mean building on these initiatives through a proactive approach that includes broad collaboration among multiple partners and sectors. This session will provide information on Health Canada initiatives aimed at protecting the most vulnerable citizens from climate change impacts.

 

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

 

See webpage for more information on the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference: http://www.sfu.ca/grc/friesen/friesen2011/

Document type: 
Video

A global perspective on the interface between climate change and population aging - 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference - Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming (2011)

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-05
Abstract: 

This video clip is the first Keynote address to the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming," MAY 25-26, 2011, Vancouver, BC. Presented by Dr. Carlos Corvalán, Senior Advisor in Risk Assessment and Global Environmental Change, Pan American Health Organization (PAHO)/WHO, Washington, DC, USA. 

Current vulnerabilities in the population affect the capacity to respond to the impact of climate change. Identifying population groups that cannot cope with the effects of climate variability and extremes is essential for designing and implementing effective strategies for climate change and health. Population ageing is a sign of public health success, and current trends indicate the process will continue in many developing countries, but so will climate change. The vulnerability of older people can be exacerbated by structural stress factors which exist in many communities, such as poverty, food insecurity, social conflict, and disease. This challenge calls for a well coordinated health sector response which includes strengthening core public health interventions to encompass greater attention to environmental and social determinants of health.

 

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

 

See webpage for more information on the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference: http://www.sfu.ca/grc/friesen/friesen2011/

Document type: 
Video

Canada's changing age structure : implications for the future : papers from a Research Symposium held at Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, August 20-23, 1981

Author: 
Date created: 
1982
Abstract: 

Note: papers from a research symposium held Aug. 20-23, 1981. 1) Population projections: Certainties and uncertainties. / Betty Havens. 2a) Social implications of a changing age structure. / John F. Myles. 2b) Discussion of paper. / Ellen M. Gee. 3a) Population aging and family life. / Leonard D. Cain. 3b) Discussion of paper. / John Crawford. 4) Social security past and present. / Charles B. Walker. 5) Aging, pensions and demographic change. / John P. Herzog. 6) Social policy concerns relating to retirement: Implications for research. / James K. Martin. 7a) The future impact of the changing status of women. / Neena L. Chappell. 7b) Discussion of paper. / Elinor J. Burwell. 8a) Education and the future. / J. Richard Connelly. 8b) Discussion of paper. / Mary Hill. 9a) Research on beliefs and attitudes about old people. / Nathan Kogan. 9b) Discussion of paper. / Wolfgang Weissleder. 10a) Possibilities and problems in using service generated data for longitudinal research on aging: Part 1: Experiences from British Columbia. / Gloria M. Gutman & Annette J. Stark. 10b) Part 2: Experiences from Manitoba. / Betty Havens.

Document type: 
Book
File(s): 

Canadian homesharing match-up agencies : five year follow-up

Author: 
Date created: 
1994
Abstract: 

The primary purpose of this study was to update a Canadian homesharing agency study conducted in 1988 (see Gutman, Doyle, Melliship & Baldwin, 1989). Additionally, we wished to see howCanadian homesharing agencies had developed over the five year period in terms of approximating I trends reported in the US literature on homesharing. Comparisons will be made between datacollected in 1988 and 1993. The specific objectives of the study were to: 1) Update the original homesharing study, and describe similarities and differences of Canadian homesharing agencies between the two time periods. 2) Compare American and Canadian research findings. 3) Determine if Canadian homesharing agencies now have had experience with the development of homesharing with a care component and/or group shared residences.

Document type: 
Book
File(s): 

Characteristics, service needs and service preferences of younger adults with severe physical disabilities : literature review.

Author: 
Date created: 
1995
Abstract: 

In Spring, 1994, as an aid to strategic planning in the Capital Regional District of British Columbia, the Simon Fraser University Gerontology Research Centre was commissioned to undertake a literature review and study focussed on younger adults with severe physical disabilities. For purposes of the project, "younger adults" were defined as persons aged 19-55. The main objectives of the project were to a) clarify the characteristics and service needs and preferences of the client group and b) to estimate the extent to which current policies and programs in the Capital Regional District were meeting the needs of clients and their families.

Document type: 
Book
File(s): 

Older drivers in British Columbia : predicting future patterns and assessing strategies for prevention of accidents. A Report for the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia's SMART Program

Date created: 
2000
Abstract: 

This report provides a comprehensive review of literature to patterns, behaviors, and policies related to older drivers in BC.

Document type: 
Technical Report
File(s):