Simon Fraser University Gerontology Research Centre

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Built environment, health and how old you are: A view across the life span - 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference - Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming (2011)

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-05
Abstract: 

This video clip comprises the four presentations of Panel Session 4, “Preparing Aging Populations for Climate Change in British Columbia and Beyond” held at the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming," MAY 25-26, 2011, Vancouver, BC. Dr. Larry Frank "Built environment, health and how old you are: A view across the life span" - Talk focuses upon the relationships between the designs of the environments where we live and how that affects our behavior and how we travel (e.g., being automobile-dependent) and how that translates not only into travel patterns, but into health impacts.

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

See webpage for more information on the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference: http://www.sfu.ca/grc/friesen/friesen2011/

Document type: 
Video

Global warming, aging and environmental physiology - 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference - Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming (2011)

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-05
Abstract: 

This video clip comprises the three presentations of Panel Session 3, “Climate Change Adaptation Strategies for Aging Populations” held at the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming," MAY 25-26, 2011, Vancouver, BC. Dr. Matthew White "Global warming, aging and environmental physiology" – Talk focuses upon what an environmental physiologist is and how they can assist the elderly during global warming and to create a link between environmental physiologists and the other areas of expertise represented in this conference.

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

See webpage for more information on the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference: http://www.sfu.ca/grc/friesen/friesen2011/

Document type: 
Video

Preparing for change: Climate action in British Columbia - 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference - Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming (2011)

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-05
Abstract: 

This video clip comprises the three presentations of Panel Session 3, “Climate Change Adaptation Strategies for Aging Populations” held at the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming," MAY 25-26, 2011, Vancouver, BC. Jennifer Pouliotte "Preparing for change: Climate action in British Columbia" - Jennifer Pouliotte is a Climate Change Adaptation Advisor with the Climate Action Secretariat in the BC Government’s Ministry of Environment. The Climate Action Secretariat provides cross-government leadership to achieve BC’s greenhouse gas emission reduction targets and to prepare for climate change impacts. This talk focuses upon the BC government's policy on 'climate action.'

 

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

 

See webpage for more information on the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference: http://www.sfu.ca/grc/friesen/friesen2011/

Document type: 
Video

New tools and processes for aging visionaries: Elders as agents of change in the community - 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference - Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming (2011)

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-05
Abstract: 

This video clip comprises the three presentations of Panel Session 3, “Climate Change Adaptation Strategies for Aging Populations” held at the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming," MAY 25-26, 2011, Vancouver, BC. Dr. Stephen Sheppard "New tools and processes for aging visionaries: Elders as agents of change in the community" - Elderly people occupy a unique position in history, as the only generation that has seen both ‘baseline’ conditions before climate change, and its emerging impacts. They thus carry a responsibility to tell their stories and reframe community perspectives on resiliency. Many communities are not “age-friendly”: people cannot walk to buy a newspaper, drop into a clinic, or age in place in smaller homes. Often seen as resistant to change, older residents of such neighbourhoods have actually become the catalyst to radical changes needed to make communities more complete, compact, healthy, resilient and low-carbon. Baby-boomers are also concerned with their future legacy, and can help communities take a long-term view. Using stories from action research in BC communities, we illustrate how aging populations can enhance their role in re-envisioning and retrofitting communities, by engaging with new visual media and visioning processes to influence community design, local policy, and social norms, and by collaborating with youth in shared community visions.

 

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

 

See webpage for more information on the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference: http://www.sfu.ca/grc/friesen/friesen2011/

Document type: 
Video

Mitigating climate change and the short and long term benefits of acting now - 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference - Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming (2011)

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-05
Abstract: 

This video clip comprises the four presentations of Panel Session 2, “Mitigation and Prevention Strategies: Lessons Learned on the Front Lines” held at the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming," MAY 25-26, 2011, Vancouver, BC. Kathy Sykes "Mitigating climate change and the short and long term benefits of acting now" - Studies suggest that acting now to mitigate the consequences of climate change has not only immediate benefits but also long term benefits. For example, by reducing green house gas emissions today benefits persons of all ages, especially those most susceptible to ozone and particulate matter. Smart growth strategies, where and how we develop, address both environmental concerns such as the human health effects from air pollution and drinking water contaminants. For example, as we build we replace natural cover with impervious surfaces such as concrete or asphalt. Impervious surfaces affect ground water due to its volume and rate of surface water runoff. An EPA report found that urban runoff is responsible for the majority of environmentally impaired ocean shorelines, impaired estuary miles and impaired lake miles. Heat islands that contribute to extreme heat events in urban centers can be mitigated through landscaping, green roofs and preserving and protecting green space.

 

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

 

See webpage for more information on the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference: http://www.sfu.ca/grc/friesen/friesen2011/

Document type: 
Video

Taking command of the obvious - 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference - Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming (2011)

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-05
Abstract: 

This video clip comprises the four presentations of Panel Session 2, “Mitigation and Prevention Strategies: Lessons Learned on the Front Lines” held at the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming," MAY 25-26, 2011, Vancouver, BC. Michael Weston "Taking command of the obvious" - As the title of this session conveys, if we are content on learning lessons but fail to apply lessons learned, then we are destined to have to learn them again. With the far reaching and lasting effects of Climate Change upon us, that would be a waste of precious time and resources. The basis of this presentation is the authors’ experience having worked or supervised well in excess of ten thousand critical emergencies involving seniors and their caregivers, and having directed the nations Aging Network’s response on 18 Presidential Declared Disasters in the United States. Lessons learned from, AND applied, at the frontlines and deep in the trenches include Safe Centers, Mega Shelters, specialized disaster products, cruise ships, and storage units, Capacity Building Staff Surveys and Matrix's are but a few examples of tools that have been used and will be examined to mitigate the potentially overwhelming set of circumstances caused by climate change and associated disasters.

 

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

 

See webpage for more information on the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference: http://www.sfu.ca/grc/friesen/friesen2011/

Document type: 
Video

Research to support public health action on heat and health - 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference - Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming (2011)

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-05
Abstract: 

This video clip comprises the four presentations of Panel Session 2, “Mitigation and Prevention Strategies: Lessons Learned on the Front Lines” held at the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming," MAY 25-26, 2011, Vancouver, BC. Dr. Tom Kosatsky " Research to support public health action on heat and health" - Research from various disciplines can promote, support and contextualize public health action to prevent illness and death related to hot weather. Examples are sociological assessments of who died during the 1995 Chicago heat wave, experimental evidence of age-related differentials in the physiology of the heat response, occupational medicine research into the time course of heat acclimatization, models of the cooling capacity of room fanning versus water misting of occupants, and spatial overlays of attributes of heat vulnerability over a city or region. During this presentation I will review projects to which I have contributed since 2003: the PHEWE study of mortality attributable to heat in 15 European cities; surveys of city and country preparedness for heat in Europe; the influence of local greenery on where hot day deaths occur in Montreal; knowledge, attitudes and practices of Montreal residents with chronic heart and lung disease around hot weather preparedness and response; changes in heat susceptibility from 1985-2010 in Vancouver; and, observed shifts in patterns of mortality during the 2009 Vancouver heat event.

 

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

 

See webpage for more information on the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference: http://www.sfu.ca/grc/friesen/friesen2011/

Document type: 
Video

Challenges encountered by older adults when seeking safe shelter pre-disaster and receiving intervention post-disaster - 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference - Growing Old in a Changing Climate

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-05
Abstract: 

This video clip comprises the four presentations of Panel Session 2, “Mitigation and Prevention Strategies: Lessons Learned on the Front Lines” held at the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming," MAY 25-26, 2011, Vancouver, BC. Dr. Lisa Brown, "Challenges encountered by older adults when seeking safe shelter pre-disaster and receiving intervention post-disaster" - Although most healthy older adults recover without assistance after extreme weather events, there are vulnerable subgroups that are at increased risk for negative health consequences. These include elders who are socially isolated, frail, physically ill, cognitively impaired, or with previous exposure to an extreme and prolonged traumatic stressor. Findings from two research projects – 1) Use of Psychological First Aid (PFA) with older adults, and 2) disaster literacy of older adults will be discussed. 1. The need for appropriate interventions for elders who have experienced traumatic events is paramount. PFA, like medical first aid, does not have to be delivered by a licensed clinician. Study results highlight methods to assess elders, strategies to enhance coping, and approaches to implement PFA at the personal, community, and healthcare system level. 2. The consequences of low health literacy on physical health have been well documented with older adults, people from diverse cultural backgrounds, and those with low incomes more likely to have health literacy problems. Because people who were either unable or unwilling to adequately prepare for and respond to the 2004 or 2005 hurricanes experienced dire consequences, the number of publications describing steps that should be taken to ensure personal safety has grown considerably. This study evaluated if the target audience possessed sufficient disaster literacy to use the information as intended.

 

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

 

See webpage for more information on the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference: http://www.sfu.ca/grc/friesen/friesen2011/

Document type: 
Video

Impact of climate change on the most vulnerable of older populations - 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference - Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming (2011)

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-05
Abstract: 

This video clip comprises the three presentations of Panel Session 1, “Defining the Issues: Climate Science, Health and Gerontological Perspectives” held at the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming," MAY 25-26, 2011, Vancouver, BC. Dr. George Tokesky " Impact of climate change on the most vulnerable of older populations" - As the population ages, changes in the world’s climate and an increase in weather-related events will affect more and more older persons. Within the aging population, the most vulnerable group is the frail elderly that require some level of care and support to remain in the community. This presentation will focus on what happens when a disaster impacts the frail elderly and the health care system designed to care for them. This presentation looks at various health care models and the challenges associated with providing care to the frailest of older persons before, during and after a major disaster. Finally, this presentation will discuss the lessons learned from nine major disasters that led to changes to the way health care is provided to frail elders during a catastrophic event.

 

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

 

See webpage for more information on the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference: http://www.sfu.ca/grc/friesen/friesen2011/

Document type: 
Video

Global aging: Key elements of the demographic transition - 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference - Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming (2011)

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-05
Abstract: 

This video clip comprises the three presentations of Panel Session 1, “Defining the Issues: Climate Science, Health and Gerontological Perspectives” held at the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming," MAY 25-26, 2011, Vancouver, BC. Dr. Gloria Gutman " Global aging: Key elements of the demographic transition" - Population aging is happening worldwide, and at unprecedented speed in the developing world. It occurs when there are two simultaneous trends: increasing life expectancy and declining fertility. But older people are not a homogeneous group. Gerontologists distinguish between the young-old (age 65-74), middle-old (75-84), older-old (85-99) and very-old (100+). While age is only a rough predictor of health, functional status and life-style, there are between age group differences that have implications for physiological and psychological reaction to climate change and ability to cope with it. This presentation will include a description of the sex distribution, housing and living arrangements, education, socio-economic status, social support, mobility, functional status and “techno-savvy” of today’s and tomorrow’s 65+ population – key variables to consider when discussing mitigation and adaptation to climate change. Also key to consider are other global trends occurring simultaneously with population ageing such as migration, urbanization and the recent economic downturn.

 

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

 

See webpage for more information on the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference: http://www.sfu.ca/grc/friesen/friesen2011/

Document type: 
Video