Simon Fraser University Gerontology Research Centre

Receive updates for this collection

Human resource challenges in home care: Putting client need first

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012-07
Abstract: 

This video clip comprises one of the 4 presentations of the PANEL SESSION: “Human Resource Challenges in Home Care” held at the 21st Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Innovations in Home Care: A Public Policy Perspective," MAY 16-17, 2012, Vancouver, BC. Presented by Bob Attfield, Regional Director Western Canada, We Care Home Health Services.

It is well known that jurisdictions with more comprehensive and integrated home care delivery systems are able to extend independent living for older people for longer periods of time, thereby reducing more costly forms of care, such as institutionalization. Better quality home care raises the quality of life of older persons, and reduces the burden of care for families. Today, however, home care is provided in a largely fragmented system with many barriers to efficiency and coverage, such as divided responsibility and funding across ministries. There are issues of access in rural and remote areas, marginalized groups and concerning human resources. The 2012 John K. Friesen conference provided a forum for discussion of both the problems and the possibilities of home care in contemporary Canada.

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

Document type: 
Video

Human resource challenges in home care

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012-07
Abstract: 

This video clip comprises one of the 4 presentations of the PANEL SESSION: “Human Resource Challenges in Home Care” held at the 21st Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Innovations in Home Care: A Public Policy Perspective," MAY 16-17, 2012, Vancouver, BC. Presented by Ed Helfrich, CEO, BC Care Providers Association.

It is well known that jurisdictions with more comprehensive and integrated home care delivery systems are able to extend independent living for older people for longer periods of time, thereby reducing more costly forms of care, such as institutionalization. Better quality home care raises the quality of life of older persons, and reduces the burden of care for families. Today, however, home care is provided in a largely fragmented system with many barriers to efficiency and coverage, such as divided responsibility and funding across ministries. There are issues of access in rural and remote areas, marginalized groups and concerning human resources. The 2012 John K. Friesen conference provided a forum for discussion of both the problems and the possibilities of home care in contemporary Canada.

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

Document type: 
Video

Uncovering the systemic issues that reside in home care

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012-07
Abstract: 

This video clip comprises the Keynote Address: “Uncovering the systemic issues that reside in home care held at the 21st Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Innovations in Home Care: A Public Policy Perspective," MAY 16-17, 2012, Vancouver, BC. Presented by Wynona Giannasi, Partner, Howegroup – Public Sector Consultants, Vancouver BC.

It is well known that jurisdictions with more comprehensive and integrated home care delivery systems are able to extend independent living for older people for longer periods of time, thereby reducing more costly forms of care, such as institutionalization. Better quality home care raises the quality of life of older persons, and reduces the burden of care for families. Today, however, home care is provided in a largely fragmented system with many barriers to efficiency and coverage, such as divided responsibility and funding across ministries. There are issues of access in rural and remote areas, marginalized groups and concerning human resources. The 2012 John K. Friesen conference provided a forum for discussion of both the problems and the possibilities of home care in contemporary Canada.

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

Document type: 
Video

Home care for an aging society: Why it’s needed; how it can be effective

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012-07
Abstract: 

This video clip comprises the IRPP Keynote Address: “Home care for an aging society: Why it’s needed; how it can be effective” held at the 21st Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Innovations in Home Care: A Public Policy Perspective," MAY 16-17, 2012, Vancouver, BC. Presented by Neena Chappell, Professor, University of Victoria.

It is well known that jurisdictions with more comprehensive and integrated home care delivery systems are able to extend independent living for older people for longer periods of time, thereby reducing more costly forms of care, such as institutionalization. Better quality home care raises the quality of life of older persons, and reduces the burden of care for families. Today, however, home care is provided in a largely fragmented system with many barriers to efficiency and coverage, such as divided responsibility and funding across ministries. There are issues of access in rural and remote areas, marginalized groups and concerning human resources. The 2012 John K. Friesen conference provided a forum for discussion of both the problems and the possibilities of home care in contemporary Canada.

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

Document type: 
Video

End-of-life and palliative home care

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012-07
Abstract: 

This video clip comprises one of the 3 presentations of Panel Session, “Pan Canadian Policy Perspectives on Home Care" held at the 21st Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Innovations in Home Care: A Public Policy Perspective," MAY 16-17, 2012, Vancouver, BC. Presented by Donna Wilson, Professor, Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta.

It is well known that jurisdictions with more comprehensive and integrated home care delivery systems are able to extend independent living for older people for longer periods of time, thereby reducing more costly forms of care, such as institutionalization. Better quality home care raises the quality of life of older persons, and reduces the burden of care for families. Today, however, home care is provided in a largely fragmented system with many barriers to efficiency and coverage, such as divided responsibility and funding across ministries. There are issues of access in rural and remote areas, marginalized groups and concerning human resources. The 2012 John K. Friesen conference provided a forum for discussion of both the problems and the possibilities of home care in contemporary Canada.

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

Document type: 
Video

Planning for seniors housing

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012-07
Abstract: 

This video clip comprises one of the 3 presentations of Panel Session, “Pan Canadian Policy Perspectives on Home Care" held at the 21st Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Innovations in Home Care: A Public Policy Perspective," MAY 16-17, 2012, Vancouver, BC. Presented by Donald Shiner, Principle Investigator of the Atlantic Seniors Housing Research Alliance.

It is well known that jurisdictions with more comprehensive and integrated home care delivery systems are able to extend independent living for older people for longer periods of time, thereby reducing more costly forms of care, such as institutionalization. Better quality home care raises the quality of life of older persons, and reduces the burden of care for families. Today, however, home care is provided in a largely fragmented system with many barriers to efficiency and coverage, such as divided responsibility and funding across ministries. There are issues of access in rural and remote areas, marginalized groups and concerning human resources. The 2012 John K. Friesen conference provided a forum for discussion of both the problems and the possibilities of home care in contemporary Canada.

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

Document type: 
Video

An overview of home and continuing care in Canada

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012-07
Abstract: 

This video clip comprises one of the 3 presentations of Panel Session, “Pan Canadian Policy Perspectives on Home Care" held at the 21st Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Innovations in Home Care: A Public Policy Perspective," MAY 16-17, 2012, Vancouver, BC. Presented by Marcus Hollander, President, Hollander Analytical Services, Victoria, BC.

It is well known that jurisdictions with more comprehensive and integrated home care delivery systems are able to extend independent living for older people for longer periods of time, thereby reducing more costly forms of care, such as institutionalization. Better quality home care raises the quality of life of older persons, and reduces the burden of care for families. Today, however, home care is provided in a largely fragmented system with many barriers to efficiency and coverage, such as divided responsibility and funding across ministries. There are issues of access in rural and remote areas, marginalized groups and concerning human resources. The 2012 John K. Friesen conference provided a forum for discussion of both the problems and the possibilities of home care in contemporary Canada.

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

Document type: 
Video

Special challenges for public health with climate change and aging populations: Waterborne illness - 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference - Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming (2011)

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-05
Abstract: 

This video clip comprises the four presentations of Panel Session 4, “Preparing Aging Populations for Climate Change in British Columbia and Beyond” held at the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming," MAY 25-26, 2011, Vancouver, BC. Dr. Tim Takaro "Special challenges for public health with climate change and aging populations: Waterborne illness" - Climate change is causing public health to pay special attention to the adaptive capacity of vulnerable populations. Seniors are at increased risk for health effects from climate change for several reasons such as reduced physiologic capacity to respond to heat and low income. They may also be at increased risk of waterborne infectious disease due to the diminished immune function in aging populations. This presentation will explore several potential public health responses to these vulnerabilities for seniors.

 

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

 

See webpage for more information on the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference: http://www.sfu.ca/grc/friesen/friesen2011/

Document type: 
Video

Climate change in BC: Implications for seniors - 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference - Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming (2011)

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-05
Abstract: 

This video clip comprises the four presentations of Panel Session 4, “Preparing Aging Populations for Climate Change in British Columbia and Beyond” held at the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming," MAY 25-26, 2011, Vancouver, BC. Dr. Aleck Ostry "Climate change in BC: Implications for seniors" - The purpose of this paper is to outline how climate change will likely affect seniors in BC. I first outline the changes in climate that are likely to occur in BC over the next several decades. This is followed by an elucidation of the main pathways between these likely changes in the environment and adverse impacts on the heath of seniors. While the limited current research on the this topic tends to focus on impacts of heat waves and air pollutants, concomitant to climate change, it is possible in BC, that community and economic de-stabilization and decreased food security attendant to climate change may be important determinants in the future for seniors’ health outcomes.

 

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

 

See webpage for more information on the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference: http://www.sfu.ca/grc/friesen/friesen2011/

Document type: 
Video

Climate change, air quality and chronic disease: Prospects for adaptation through urban design - 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference - Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming (2011)

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-05
Abstract: 

This video clip comprises the four presentations of Panel Session 4, “Preparing Aging Populations for Climate Change in British Columbia and Beyond” held at the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Growing Old in a Changing Climate: Exploring the Interface Between Population Aging and Global Warming," MAY 25-26, 2011, Vancouver, BC. Dr. Michael Brauer "Climate change, air quality and chronic disease: Prospects for adaptation through urban design" - Climate change and air pollution are linked through common emission sources and health impacts. Warming is linked to increased forest fires, smoke emissions and resultant respiratory disease impacts. Warmer climates have already led to longer pollen seasons, worsening symptoms for those with pre-existing allergic diseases. Increases in the frequency and intensity of extreme heat events are also expected to coincide with increased summer smog episodes and their resulting cardiovascular and respiratory health impacts, including premature mortality. Health impacts of climate change via air pollution will require increased application of traditional health protection measures, while common emissions sources require that climate mitigation approaches do not compromise air quality. However, these interactions also suggest opportunities for co-benefits through which greenhouse gas emissions are reduced in combination with reductions in emissions of health-damaging air pollutants.

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

 

See webpage for more information on the 20th Annual John K. Friesen Conference: http://www.sfu.ca/grc/friesen/friesen2011/

Document type: 
Video