Simon Fraser University Gerontology Research Centre

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RE:ACT Adult Protection Program

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012-07
Abstract: 

This video clip comprises one of the 5 presentations of the PANEL SESSION: “The Front Line – Home Care Providersheld at the 21st Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Innovations in Home Care: A Public Policy Perspective," MAY 16-17, 2012, Vancouver, BC. Presented by Kristen Farquharson, Manager, RE:ACT Adult Protection Program & Patient Quality Care Office, Vancouver Coastal Health.

It is well known that jurisdictions with more comprehensive and integrated home care delivery systems are able to extend independent living for older people for longer periods of time, thereby reducing more costly forms of care, such as institutionalization. Better quality home care raises the quality of life of older persons, and reduces the burden of care for families. Today, however, home care is provided in a largely fragmented system with many barriers to efficiency and coverage, such as divided responsibility and funding across ministries. There are issues of access in rural and remote areas, marginalized groups and concerning human resources. The 2012 John K. Friesen conference provided a forum for discussion of both the problems and the possibilities of home care in contemporary Canada.

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

Document type: 
Video

Live-in caregivers

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012-07
Abstract: 

This video clip comprises one of the 5 presentations of the PANEL SESSION: “The Front Line – Home Care Providersheld at the 21st Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Innovations in Home Care: A Public Policy Perspective," MAY 16-17, 2012, Vancouver, BC. Presented by Alisha Bell, Barrister & Solicitor, Independent Legal Contractor, West Coast Domestic Workers' Association.

It is well known that jurisdictions with more comprehensive and integrated home care delivery systems are able to extend independent living for older people for longer periods of time, thereby reducing more costly forms of care, such as institutionalization. Better quality home care raises the quality of life of older persons, and reduces the burden of care for families. Today, however, home care is provided in a largely fragmented system with many barriers to efficiency and coverage, such as divided responsibility and funding across ministries. There are issues of access in rural and remote areas, marginalized groups and concerning human resources. The 2012 John K. Friesen conference provided a forum for discussion of both the problems and the possibilities of home care in contemporary Canada.

 

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

Document type: 
Video

The front line: Community health workers

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012-07
Abstract: 

This video clip comprises one of the 5 presentations of the PANEL SESSION: “The Front Line – Home Care Providersheld at the 21st Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Innovations in Home Care: A Public Policy Perspective," MAY 16-17, 2012, Vancouver, BC. Presented by Diana Hill, Director, Home Support Services, Greater Vancouver Community Support Society.

It is well known that jurisdictions with more comprehensive and integrated home care delivery systems are able to extend independent living for older people for longer periods of time, thereby reducing more costly forms of care, such as institutionalization. Better quality home care raises the quality of life of older persons, and reduces the burden of care for families. Today, however, home care is provided in a largely fragmented system with many barriers to efficiency and coverage, such as divided responsibility and funding across ministries. There are issues of access in rural and remote areas, marginalized groups and concerning human resources. The 2012 John K. Friesen conference provided a forum for discussion of both the problems and the possibilities of home care in contemporary Canada.

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

Document type: 
Video

Relationship of the union and workers in home care

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012-07
Abstract: 

This video clip comprises one of the 5 presentations of the PANEL SESSION: “The Front Line – Home Care Providersheld at the 21st Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Innovations in Home Care: A Public Policy Perspective," MAY 16-17, 2012, Vancouver, BC. Presented by Anita Zaenker, Researcher, BC Government and Service Employees’ Union.

It is well known that jurisdictions with more comprehensive and integrated home care delivery systems are able to extend independent living for older people for longer periods of time, thereby reducing more costly forms of care, such as institutionalization. Better quality home care raises the quality of life of older persons, and reduces the burden of care for families. Today, however, home care is provided in a largely fragmented system with many barriers to efficiency and coverage, such as divided responsibility and funding across ministries. There are issues of access in rural and remote areas, marginalized groups and concerning human resources. The 2012 John K. Friesen conference provided a forum for discussion of both the problems and the possibilities of home care in contemporary Canada.

 

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

Document type: 
Video

Three policy directions for home care

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012-07
Abstract: 

This video clip comprises one of the 5 presentations of the PANEL SESSION: “The Front Line – Home Care Providersheld at the 21st Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Innovations in Home Care: A Public Policy Perspective," MAY 16-17, 2012, Vancouver, BC. Presented by Lou Black, Researcher and Policy Analyst, BC Hospital Employees’ Union.

It is well known that jurisdictions with more comprehensive and integrated home care delivery systems are able to extend independent living for older people for longer periods of time, thereby reducing more costly forms of care, such as institutionalization. Better quality home care raises the quality of life of older persons, and reduces the burden of care for families. Today, however, home care is provided in a largely fragmented system with many barriers to efficiency and coverage, such as divided responsibility and funding across ministries. There are issues of access in rural and remote areas, marginalized groups and concerning human resources. The 2012 John K. Friesen conference provided a forum for discussion of both the problems and the possibilities of home care in contemporary Canada.

 

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

Document type: 
Video

Home care 2012: Achievements, challenges, opportunities

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012-07
Abstract: 

This video clip comprises the Keynote Address: “Home care 2012: Achievements, challenges, opportunities held at the 21st Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Innovations in Home Care: A Public Policy Perspective," MAY 16-17, 2012, Vancouver, BC. Presented by Isobel Mackenzie, Chief Executive Officer, Beacon Community Services.

It is well known that jurisdictions with more comprehensive and integrated home care delivery systems are able to extend independent living for older people for longer periods of time, thereby reducing more costly forms of care, such as institutionalization. Better quality home care raises the quality of life of older persons, and reduces the burden of care for families. Today, however, home care is provided in a largely fragmented system with many barriers to efficiency and coverage, such as divided responsibility and funding across ministries. There are issues of access in rural and remote areas, marginalized groups and concerning human resources. The 2012 John K. Friesen conference provided a forum for discussion of both the problems and the possibilities of home care in contemporary Canada.

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

Document type: 
Video

Recommendations and responses to home and community care: The BC Ombudsperson Report

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012-07
Abstract: 

This video clip comprises the Free Public Lecture, "Recommendations and responses to home and community care: The BC Ombudsperson Report," held at the 21st Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Innovations in Home Care: A Public Policy Perspective," MAY 16-17, 2012, Vancouver, BC.  Presented by Kim Carter, Ombudsperson, for the Province of British Columbia.

It is well known that jurisdictions with more comprehensive and integrated home care delivery systems are able to extend independent living for older people for longer periods of time, thereby reducing more costly forms of care, such as institutionalization. Better quality home care raises the quality of life of older persons, and reduces the burden of care for families. Today, however, home care is provided in a largely fragmented system with many barriers to efficiency and coverage, such as divided responsibility and funding across ministries. There are issues of access in rural and remote areas, marginalized groups and concerning human resources. The 2012 John K. Friesen conference provided a forum for discussion of both the problems and the possibilities of home care in contemporary Canada.

 

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

Document type: 
Video

The Longevity Revolution - First Annual Ellen M. Gee Memorial Lecture (2003)

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012-07
Abstract: 

This lecture discusses the myriad aspects and implications of the 20th Century revolution in longevity. Presented by Robert N. Butler, M.D., President and CEO of the International Longevity Center - USA, and Professor of Geriatrics at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City. This lecture was originally broadcast live on October 9, 2003.

Document type: 
Video

Education: Making a difference

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012-07
Abstract: 

This video clip comprises one of the 4 presentations of the PANEL SESSION: “Human Resource Challenges in Home Care” held at the 21st Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Innovations in Home Care: A Public Policy Perspective," MAY 16-17, 2012, Vancouver, BC. Presented by Patricia Bawtinhaimer, Association of Canadian Community Colleges.

It is well known that jurisdictions with more comprehensive and integrated home care delivery systems are able to extend independent living for older people for longer periods of time, thereby reducing more costly forms of care, such as institutionalization. Better quality home care raises the quality of life of older persons, and reduces the burden of care for families. Today, however, home care is provided in a largely fragmented system with many barriers to efficiency and coverage, such as divided responsibility and funding across ministries. There are issues of access in rural and remote areas, marginalized groups and concerning human resources. The 2012 John K. Friesen conference provided a forum for discussion of both the problems and the possibilities of home care in contemporary Canada.

 

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

Document type: 
Video

Putting the pieces together - home care: Understanding the human resource challenges and leveraging the opportunities

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012-07
Abstract: 

This video clip comprises one of the 4 presentations of the PANEL SESSION: “Human Resource Challenges in Home Care” held at the 21st Annual John K. Friesen Conference, "Innovations in Home Care: A Public Policy Perspective," MAY 16-17, 2012, Vancouver, BC. Presented by Lynda Foley, Executive Director, Home Health and End of Life Care, Fraser Health Authority.

It is well known that jurisdictions with more comprehensive and integrated home care delivery systems are able to extend independent living for older people for longer periods of time, thereby reducing more costly forms of care, such as institutionalization. Better quality home care raises the quality of life of older persons, and reduces the burden of care for families. Today, however, home care is provided in a largely fragmented system with many barriers to efficiency and coverage, such as divided responsibility and funding across ministries. There are issues of access in rural and remote areas, marginalized groups and concerning human resources. The 2012 John K. Friesen conference provided a forum for discussion of both the problems and the possibilities of home care in contemporary Canada.

We also gratefully acknowledge a grant from the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund for videography and post-production editing.

Document type: 
Video