Simon Fraser University Gerontology Research Centre

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Flying high : a guide to shared leadership in retirement

Date created: 
1990
Abstract: 

The program is for: (1) senior leaders who would like more people in their group or organization to assume leadership responsibilities; (2) senior participants who are not happy with the kind of leadership their group or organization is providing; (3) senior volunteers who would like a greater share in decision-making in their groups or organizations; and (4) seniors in traditional leadership roles who would like to enhance their skills.

Document type: 
Book
File(s): 

Focus group study of older drivers

Date created: 
1988
Abstract: 

The report describes findings from a study exploring the driving practices and driving-related beliefs and attitudes of older persons. The methodology employed was a modified focus group technique. Participants, 162 currently licensed drivers aged 56-86 living in five different geographic locations in British Columbia met in 31small groups (mean size 5.2 persons) to discuss eight topics. These topics concerned their driving practices; attitudes and I beliefs about their own and other older persons' driving behaviour; their driving difficulties; ways in which road or traffic signs and signals could be changed to make driving easier for them; their feelings about a series of questions relating to the retesting of older drivers, criteria for licence renewal and driving cessation; concerning driver education courses for older persons, traffic violations they most frequently commit and their experience of medication affecting their driving. Throughout the report data are presented separately for respondents aged 55-65, 66-75 and 76 and over. Where noticeable, differences between the three age groups are highlighted.

Document type: 
Book
File(s): 

Fact book on aging in British Columbia, 3rd Edition

Date created: 
2000
Abstract: 

Table of ContentsForeword; 1. Size of the Elderly Population; 1.1 Past Trends and Future Growth; 1.2 Population Aging Within the Older Population Itself; 1.3 Median Age of the Population; 2. Sex Ratio; 3. Mortality; 3.1 Trends in Life Expectancy; 3.2 Deaths and Mortality Rates; 3.3 Causes of Death; 3.4 Cancer; 4. Marital Status; 5. Geographic Distribution and Mobility; 5.1 The Older Population of B.C. in Relation to Other Provinces; 5.2 Rural-Urban Distribution; 5.3 Geographic Distribution Within British Columbia; 5.3.1 Geographic Distribution Within the Greater Vancouver Regional District; 5.3.2 Geographic Distribution Within the Capital Regional District; 5.4 Mobility; 5.4.1 Total Population and Population Aged 65+;5.4.2 Distance Moved; 6. Ethnic Composition; 6.1 Predominant Groups; 6.2 Proportion of Ethnic Origin Groups Aged 65+; 6.3 Visible Minorities; 6.4 Mother Tongue; 6.5 Immigrants; 6.6 Aboriginal Peoples; 7. Living Arrangements; 7.1 Persons by Type; 7.2 Types of Household; 8. Housing; 8.1 Home Ownership 8.2 Housing Costs; 8.3 Preferred Structural Type; 9. Education 9.1 Educational Attainment; 9.2 Educational Attendance; 10. Labour Force; 10.1 Labour Force Participation Trends; 10.2 Full and Part-time Employment; 11. Unpaid Activities; 11.1 Unpaid Housework; 11.2 Unpaid Caregiving to Seniors; 11.3 Unpaid Childcare; 12. Income; 12.1 Median Income of Individuals; 12.2 Poverty Rate; 12.3 Incidence of Low Income Among Economic Families; 13. Disabilities; 13.1 Disability Rates;13.2 Seniors with Disabilities in Private Households and Institutions; 13.3 Nature of Disabilities; 13.4 Severity of Disabilities; 14. Health Service Utilization; 14.1 Hospitals; 14.2 Continuing Care; 14.3 Health Service Expenditures

Document type: 
Book
File(s): 

A beginner's guide to Canada's public pension system

Author: 
Date created: 
1997
Abstract: 

This booklet is intended to provide a basic overview of Canada's public pensions. It is published by the Gerontology Research Centre at Simon Fraser University with funding from the Royal Canadian Legion, Pacific Command. It covers highlights only. The information here refers to both men and women. However, because Canadian women usually live longer than men and often interrupt their paid work for family responsibilities, there are some facts that are especially important for women to know. The information in this booklet is current at the time of printing.

Document type: 
Book
File(s): 

Fact book on aging in British Columbia, [1st Edition]

Date created: 
1986
Abstract: 

Table of Contents Page
1. Size of the Elderly Population 1
1.1 Past Trends and Future Growth 1
1.2 Population Aging Within the Older Population Itself 3
1.3 Median Age of the Population 5
2. Sex Ratios 7
3. Mortality 9
3.1 Trends in Life Expectancy 9
3.2 Mortality Rates 13
3.3 Causes of Death 15
4. Marital Status 17
5. Geographic Distribution and Mobility 20
5.1 The Older Population of B.C. in Relation to Other Provinces 20
5.2 Rural-Urban Distribution 22
5.3 Geographic Distribution Within British Columbia 24
5.3.1 Geographic Distribution Within the Greater Vancouver 26
Regional District
5.3.2 Geographic Distribution Within the Capital Regional 28
District
5.4 Mobility 30
5.4.1 Total Population and Population Aged 65+ 31
5.4.2 Distance Moved 32
5.4.3 Net Internal Migration 35
6.. Ethnic Composition 37
6.1 Predominant Groups 37
6.2 Proportion of Ethnic Origin Groups Aged 65+ 39
6.3 Original Peoples 41
7. Living Arrangements 42
7.1 Persons by Type 42
7.2 Private Households - Present and Future 44
8. Housing 47
8.1 Home Ownership 47
8.2 Preferred Structural Type 4.9
8.3 Condition of Dwelling 52
8.4 Housing Costs 54
9. Education 56
9.1 Education Attainment 56
10. Labour Force 59
10.1 Labour Force Participation Trneds 59
10.2 Occupations 61
10.3 Full and Part-time Employment 63
11. Income 65
11.1 Income of Individuals 65
11.2 Income of Families and Non-family Persons in Private 67
Households
12. Health Care Utilization 69
12.1 Hospitalization 69
12.2 Continuing Care 74
12.3 Physician Services 77
Appendices

Document type: 
Book
File(s): 

Fact book on aging in British Columbia, 2nd Edition

Date created: 
1995
Abstract: 

Table of Contents1. Size of the Elderly Population;1.1 Past Trends and Future Growth; 1.2 Population Aging Within the Older Population Itself; 1.3 Median Age of the Population; 2. Sex Ratios; 3. Mortality; 3.1 Trends in Life Expectancy; 3.2 Mortality Rates; 3.3 Causes of Death; 4. Marital Status; 5. Geographic Distribution and Mobility; 5.1 The Older Population of B.C. in Relation to Other Provinces; 5.2 Rural-Urban Distribution; 5.3 Geographic Distribution Within British Columbia; 5.3.1 Geographic Distribution Within the Greater Vancouver Regional District; 5.3.2 Geographic Distribution Within the Capital Regional District; 5 .4 Mobility; 4.1 Total Population and Population Aged 65+; 5.4.2 Distance Moved; 6. Ethnic Composition; 6.1 Predominant Groups; 6.2 Proportion of Ethnic Origin Groups Aged 65+; 6.3 Aboriginal People; 7. Living Arrangements; 7.1 Persons by Type; 7.2 Private Households - Present and Future; 8. Housing; 8.1 Home Ownership; 8.2 Preferred Structural Type; 8.3 Housing Costs; 9. Education; 9.1 Educational Attainment; 10. Labour Force; 10.1 Labour Force Participation Trends; 10.2 Full and Part-time Employment; 11 Income; 11.1 Median Income of Individuals; 11.2 Poverty Rate; 12 Disabilities;12.1 Disability Rates; 12.2 Seniors with Disabilities in Private Households and Institutions; 12.3 Nature of Disabilities; 12.4 Severity of Disabilities; 13 Health Service; 13.1 Hospitals; 13.2 Continuing Care; Appendix.

Document type: 
Book
File(s): 

The Eldonian Care of the Elderly Project

Author: 
Date created: 
1993
Abstract: 

The Institute of Human Ageing was commissioned by the Eldonian Development Trust to undertake a feasibility study into the setting-up of an initiative in the provision of community care for the elderly in the Vauxhall and North Liverpool area. The research began in January 1993 and covered three main areas: (1) Needs of older people and carers: The key to the project is to understand the needs of elderly people and their carers from their perspective and to look to develop consumer-driven services in Vauxhall. To this end we have interviewed 50 people in the Vauxhall area. In addition the views of experts and professionals involved in care of the elderly in the statutory and independent sectors have been elicited. From a quantitative perspective, a detailed examination of statistical sources has been undertaken to estimate the potential market for community care in North Liverpool. (2) Funding/contractual component: Local Authority service purchasers under the new community care framework have been contacted, to examine the development of care funding arrangements in Liverpool. (3) Training and enterprise component: An aim of the initiative is to develop services in the Vauxhall area that will attract funding and generate employment opportunities. Developing an appropriate skill base through training will be a key part of the initiative. Responsibility for this element of the project is with Jane Hobson of Manchester Consulting Group. It is recognised that specific recommendations regarding training are not possible until a clear business plan has been developed.

Document type: 
Book
File(s): 

Environmental design, staffing and programming needs of younger adults in long-term care facilities : residents' and staff's perceptions

Date created: 
1989
Abstract: 

Concern over provision of long-term care for an increasing seniors' population has tended to obscure the fact that younger persons may also require this type of care. How do individuals between the ages of 20-64, who are the focus of this report, feel about living in close proximity to mostly very old (i.e. age 75 or over) persons? In an attempt to answer this and other questions concerning the characteristics and care needs of the younger adult long-term care facility population, an extensive search of the literature was undertaken. As indicated in the report (Gutman, 1989) summarizing findings from this search, the bulk of what little data are available concerning this client group derive from units specializing in their care (i.e. so-called Younger Disabled Units). To ascertain the extent to which findings from these units are generalizable to British Columbia, and to obtain answers to questions concerning environmental design, staffing and programming needs that have not heretofore been addressed in the literature, a study was conducted, in Spring 1989, in two hospitals in BC.TABLE OF CONTENTS: 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 Background and Rationale for the Study 1.2 Characteristics of Two Units Participating in the Study 2.METHOD 3.FINDINGS 4. DISCUSSION Appendix I Classification criteria for levels of long term care in British Columbia. Appendix II Criteria for admission to Hospital A's Sustained Rehabilitation Head Injury Program

Document type: 
Book
File(s): 

Evaluation of the Alzheimer's Disease Society South Cleveland Project

Author: 
Date created: 
1991
Abstract: 

The South Cleveland branch of the Alzheimer's Disease Society (ADS) asked the Institute of Human Ageing of the University of Liverpool to undertake a comprehensive evaluation of their project in South Cleveland. In South Cleveland the ADS has a well-developed programme of day care and carer counselling, together with a range of other support services, such as a sitting service and information service. The evaluation focused on the following issues: What is the impact of the project on the lives of the carers? Are carers coping longer and what is the effect on their quality of life? What aspects of the service have had the most impact? Are the services meeting the needs of all carers? Where could improvements be made? Assessment of the care provided for sufferers: Are sufferers being provided with a high quality of care? What are the implications of different levels of disability? What effect has the project had on other services in South Cleveland? What is the level of I need for services in the local community? Does the ADS project play a significant role within the overall pattern of care in the district?Public awareness of Alzheimer's Disease: Are members of the public aware of AD and its effects? What profile does the ADS have within the local community? Has the ADS had any effect on raising public awareness of AD? The evaluation touched on a wide range of issues, which demanded a range of methodologies. Interviews were conducted with carers, ADS staff and with professionals from other organisations that deal with care of the elderly and the elderly mentally ill. A self-completion questionnaire was also sent to carers, which provided essential background information on their experiences of being a carer and their attitudes towards available services. All the ADS slay centres were visited during the course of the research. On these visits, observational research was undertaken, together with interviews with volunteer workers and sufferers and dependency assessments of clients. Public awareness of AD in South Cleveland was assessed by undertaking a Street survey in Middlesborough, which generated a random sample of some 300 respondents. The field research was undertaken over a 12 month period in 1990 and 1991.

Document type: 
Book
File(s): 

Evaluation of the Third Age series : final report.

Date created: 
1994
Abstract: 

The "Third Age" series comprised 10 programmes transmitted between October 21st and December 23rd 1993, on BBC2 at 2.00pm on Thursdays. The series succeeded others for I older viewers, such as "Prime Time", but was to be of a very different character, both in terms of its "message" and format. The BBC also produced a free magazine to accompany the series, with financial support from the European Commission as part of the European I Year of the Elderly and Solidarity between the generations. The title, "The Third Age', refers to that time of life after a person's main career or job has finished and children have left home and before the "Fourth Age", the time of increasing frailty, dependence and finally, death. Broadly speaking this is the years between ages 50 and 75, which now accounts for about 13 million people in Britain. Unlike the common social images of old age, the vast majority of these people are fit, active and independent. The research had two objectives. Firstly, information has been provided on reactions to the programme, in terms of likes and dislikes, viewing preferences and behaviours and attitudes towards the programmes. However, a second and more fundamental aim has been to assess whether the series has had an impact on the attitudes and behaviour of its target audience. Did the underlying message of the programme - to make the most out of life in the later years -get translated into new ways of thinking about later life and the uptake of new activities, hobbies and interests? This question was approached in two ways: (1) by asking viewers whether the programmes had influenced them; and (2) by independently monitoring changes in attitudes and behaviour.

Document type: 
Book
File(s):