Communication, School of

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A Non-Parametric Maximum for Reasonable Number of Rejected Hypotheses: Objective Optima for False Discovery Rate and Significance Threshold in Exploratory Research with Application to Ordinal Survey Analysis

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2017-03-24
Abstract: 

This paper identifies a criterion for choosing the largest set of rejected hypotheses in high-dimensional data analysis where Multiple Hypothesis testing is used in exploratory research to identify significant associations among many variables. The method neither requires predetermined thresholds for level of significance, nor uses presumed thresholds for false discovery rate. The upper limit for number of rejected hypotheses is determined by finding maximum difference between expected true hypotheses and false hypotheses among all possible sets of rejected hypotheses. Methods of choosing a reasonable number of rejected hypotheses and application to non-parametric analysis of ordinal survey data are presented.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Tecnologia, Modernida e Democracia

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015
Document type: 
Book
File(s): 

Between Objectivity and Openness—The Mediality of Data for Journalism

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014-01-30
Abstract: 

A number of recent high profile news events have emphasised the importance of data as a journalistic resource. But with no definitive definition for what constitutes data in journalism, it is difficult to determine what the implications of collecting, analysing, and disseminating data are for journalism, particularly in terms of objectivity in journalism. Drawing selectively from theories of mediation and research in journalism studies we critically examine how data is incorporated into journalistic practice. In the first half of the paper, we argue that data's value for journalism is constructed through mediatic dimensions that unevenly evoke different socio-technical contexts including scientific research and computing. We develop three key dimensions related to data's mediality within journalism: the problem of scale, transparency work, and the provision of access to data as 'openness'. Having developed this first approach, we turn to a journalism studies perspective of journalism's longstanding "regime of objectivity", a regime that encompasses interacting news production practices, epistemological assumptions, and institutional arrangements, in order to consider how data is incorporated into journalism's own established procedures for producing objectivity. At first sight, working with data promises to challenge the regime, in part by taking a more conventionalist or interpretivist epistemological position with regard to the representation of truth. However, we argue that how journalists and other actors choose to work with data may in some ways deepen the regime's epistemological stance. We conclude by outlining a set of questions for future research into the relationship between data, objectivity and journalism.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Do Health and Forensic DNA Databases Increase Racial Disparities?

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011
Abstract: 
  • The issue of the digital divide is a growing concern in health and forensic DNA databases, reflecting structural disparities in biomedical research and policing.
  • Over the last decade, the majority of DNA samples in population studies are from individuals of European origin. Individuals from Asian, African, Latino, and aboriginal groups are underrepresented.
  • Forensic DNA databases are growing to mirror racial disparities in arrest practices and incarceration rates. Individuals from African American and Latino groups are overrepresented in forensic from health DNA databases.
  • Currently, there is little recognition in national and international public policy circles about the “digital divide” in health and law enforcement databases.
  • To avoid reproducing structural patterns of racial inequality, regulators, policy makers, scientists, and law enforcement officials need to address these disparities by supporting policies and mechanisms designed to better protect individuals and groups through institutional practices, law, and securely encrypted digital codes.
Document type: 
Article

Resilient Development in Central America? Rethinking Progress

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-10-26
Abstract: 

The author sets out to construct a historical approach to thinking about resilience that is grounded in a critical approach to "the international" as well as an alternative notion of progress. Specifically, it is posited that resilience is the outcome of developments that emerge through a process of uneven and combined development.

Document type: 
Article

Enclosure and open access in communication scholarship

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011
Abstract: 

The current state of scholarly communication is one of contest between an increasingly commercial system that is dysfunctional and incompatible with the basic aims of scholarship, and emerging alternatives, particularly open access publishing and open access archiving. Two approaches to facilitating global participation in scholarly communication are contrasted in this paper; equity is seen as a superior goal to the donor model, which requires poverty or inequity to succeed. The current state of scholarly communication within the discipline of communication is examined. Journal publishing in communication shows a greater diversity of ownership and less commercial concentration than scholarly publishing overall; this, and the at least 76 fully open access journals in this area suggest strong potential for emancipating scholarship in communication from commercial imperatives. Specific sites of struggle and actions for scholars, including developing open access journals and self-archiving, are presented.