Communication, School of

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On Hypo-Real Models or Global Climate Change: A Challenge for the Humanities

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015
Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Marshall McLuhan: The First Cyberpunk Author?

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Working the Digital Humanities: Uncovering Shadows between the Dark and the Light

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

The following is an exchange between the two authors in response to a paper given by Chun at the “Dark Side of the Digital Humanities” panel at the 2013 Modern Languages Association (mla) Annual Convention. This panel, designed to provoke controversy and debate, succeeded in doing so. However, in order to create a more rigorous conversation focused on the many issues raised and elided and on the possibilities and limitations of digital humanities as they currently exist, we have produced this collaborative text. Common themes in Rhody’s and Chun’s responses are: the need to frame digital humanities within larger changes to university funding and structure, the importance of engaging with uncertainty and the ways in which digital humanities can elucidate “shadows” in the archive, and the need for and difficulty of creating alliances across diverse disciplines.  We hope that this text provokes more ruminations on the future of the university (rather than simply on the humanities) and leads to more wary, creative, and fruitful engagements with digital technologies that are increasingly shaping the ways and means by which we think. 

Document type: 
Article

Introduction: Race and/as Technology; or, How to Do Things to Race

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2009
Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

On “Sourcery,” or Code as Fetish

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

This essay offers a sympathetic interrogation of the move within new media studies toward “software studies.” Arguing against theoretical conceptions of programming languages as the ultimate performative utterance, it contends that source code is never simply the source of any action; rather, source code is only source code after the fact: its effectiveness depends on a whole imagined network of machines and humans. This does not mean that source code does nothing, but rather that it serves as a kind of fetish, and that the notion of the user as super agent, buttressed by real-time computation, is the obverse, not the opposite of this “sourcery.”

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

The Enduring Ephemeral, or the Future Is a Memory

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2008
Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

On Software, or the Persistence of Visual Knowledge

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2005
Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Unbearable Witness: Toward a Politics of Listening

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1999
Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Property TV: Financialized Femininity and New Forms of Domestic Labour

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2017-04-27
Abstract: 

This article argues that melodrama plays an important role in shaping the ambivalent narratives of property TV. Using the HGTV Canada show Buy Herself as a case study, the article considers the rise of what amounts to a new women’s genre as an attempt to frame and contain gendered experiences of the financialization of the domestic sphere. Positioning the show within neoliberalism’s faux feminism and superficial discourse of diversity, the article posits that the focus on the melodramatic struggles of real estate buyers in the reality genre of property TV brings to the fore anxieties and contradictions incited by the neoliberal imperatives to reframe the domestic sphere as real estate investment and normalize debt.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

A Non-Parametric Maximum for Reasonable Number of Rejected Hypotheses: Objective Optima for False Discovery Rate and Significance Threshold in Exploratory Research with Application to Ordinal Survey Analysis

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2017-03-24
Abstract: 

This paper identifies a criterion for choosing the largest set of rejected hypotheses in high-dimensional data analysis where Multiple Hypothesis testing is used in exploratory research to identify significant associations among many variables. The method neither requires predetermined thresholds for level of significance, nor uses presumed thresholds for false discovery rate. The upper limit for number of rejected hypotheses is determined by finding maximum difference between expected true hypotheses and false hypotheses among all possible sets of rejected hypotheses. Methods of choosing a reasonable number of rejected hypotheses and application to non-parametric analysis of ordinal survey data are presented.

Document type: 
Article
File(s):