Communication, School of

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Influence of Peer Support on HIV/STI Prevention and Safety Amongst International Migrant Sex Workers: A Qualitative Study at the Mexico-Guatemala Border

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2018-01-05
Abstract: 

Background

Migrant women engaged in precarious employment, such as sex work, frequently face pronounced social isolation alongside other barriers to health and human rights. Although peer support has been identified as a critical HIV and violence prevention intervention for sex workers, little is known about access to peer support or its role in shaping health and social outcomes for migrant sex workers. This article analyses the role of peer support in shaping vulnerability and resilience related to HIV/STI prevention and violence among international migrant sex workers at the Mexico-Guatemala border. 

Methods

This qualitative study is based on 31 semi-structured interviews conducted with international migrant sex workers in the Mexico-Guatemala border communities of Tapachula, Mexico and Tecún Umán and Quetzaltenango, Guatemala.

Results

Peer support was found to be critical for reducing social isolation; improving access to HIV/STI knowledge, prevention and resources; and mitigating workplace violence, particularly at the initial stages of migration and sex work. Peer support was especially critical for countering social isolation, and peers represented a valuable source of HIV/STI prevention knowledge and resources (e.g., condoms), as well as essential safety supports in the workplace. However, challenges to accessing peer support were noted, including difficulties establishing long-lasting relationships and other forms of social participation due to frequent mobility, as well as tensions among peers within some work environments. Variations in access to peer support related to country of work, work environment, sex work and migration stage, and sex work experience were also identified. 

Conclusions

Results indicate that peer-led and community empowerment interventions represent a promising strategy for promoting the health, safety and human rights of migrant sex workers. Tailored community empowerment interventions addressing the unique migration-related contexts and challenges faced by migrant sex workers should be a focus of future community-based research, alongside promotion of broader structural changes.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

The Commodity-Form in Cuba’s Telecom and Wireless Services: A Marxist Political Economy Overview

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2018-03-01
Abstract: 

In contemporary Cuba, there is a blatant contradiction between the high prices of telecom and wireless services, controlled by a state monopoly, and the weak purchasing power of the working class. This contradiction evidences a process of commodification that cannot be simply traced back to the partial privatizations that the Cuban telecom system experienced after the collapse of the Soviet bloc in the 1990s. Commodification is derived from a broader restructuring of the state socialist economy that started in the 1990s: the state-led appropriation of value in circulation when value is in the money form. In the context of a crisis in accumulation, obstacles against changing the conditions in production fostered transformations in the domain of circulation to appropriate value in the hands of the state. Within these transformations, partial privatizations and the commodification of the telecom and wireless services have played a key role for the national economy. 

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Rewiring UNESCO’s World Heritage Centre and Rural Peripheries: Imagined Community and Concrete Inequality From France’s Corsica to China’s Heyang

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2017-12-01
Abstract: 

UNESCO’s World Heritage Centre’s communication monopoly over nationally filtered heritage operates not in an apolitical past but in present politics. Working through the “World Heritage Order” and its changing definition of “outstanding universal value,” this article develops a bridge between seemingly disconnected rural sites in France and the People’s Republic of China to move beyond the confines of “imagined communities” and their potential for displacing “concrete inequalities.” The article extends a critical approach of communication to heritage and contextualizes present rural heritage communication within larger political economic and cultural processes of urban–rural and capital–capillary dynamics that enables, in the cases examined, their current heritage identity. 

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

On Hypo-Real Models or Global Climate Change: A Challenge for the Humanities

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015
Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Marshall McLuhan: The First Cyberpunk Author?

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Working the Digital Humanities: Uncovering Shadows between the Dark and the Light

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

The following is an exchange between the two authors in response to a paper given by Chun at the “Dark Side of the Digital Humanities” panel at the 2013 Modern Languages Association (mla) Annual Convention. This panel, designed to provoke controversy and debate, succeeded in doing so. However, in order to create a more rigorous conversation focused on the many issues raised and elided and on the possibilities and limitations of digital humanities as they currently exist, we have produced this collaborative text. Common themes in Rhody’s and Chun’s responses are: the need to frame digital humanities within larger changes to university funding and structure, the importance of engaging with uncertainty and the ways in which digital humanities can elucidate “shadows” in the archive, and the need for and difficulty of creating alliances across diverse disciplines.  We hope that this text provokes more ruminations on the future of the university (rather than simply on the humanities) and leads to more wary, creative, and fruitful engagements with digital technologies that are increasingly shaping the ways and means by which we think. 

Document type: 
Article

Introduction: Race and/as Technology; or, How to Do Things to Race

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2009
Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

On “Sourcery,” or Code as Fetish

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

This essay offers a sympathetic interrogation of the move within new media studies toward “software studies.” Arguing against theoretical conceptions of programming languages as the ultimate performative utterance, it contends that source code is never simply the source of any action; rather, source code is only source code after the fact: its effectiveness depends on a whole imagined network of machines and humans. This does not mean that source code does nothing, but rather that it serves as a kind of fetish, and that the notion of the user as super agent, buttressed by real-time computation, is the obverse, not the opposite of this “sourcery.”

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

The Enduring Ephemeral, or the Future Is a Memory

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2008
Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

On Software, or the Persistence of Visual Knowledge

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2005
Document type: 
Article
File(s):