Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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This collection contains digitized SFU theses except for those theses submitted within the last 12 months. If you cannot find the thesis you are looking for please search Recently Submitted Theses as it may be a recently submitted thesis and thus not yet available in Summit.

A case study of print on demand and short-run digital printing at the University of British Columbia Press

Abstract: 

The advent of digital print technology has irreversibly affected the publishing industry, causing many, if not all, publishers to review and restructure their methods of production and distribution. Scholarly publishing, a niche sector, has been similarly impacted and, in response, the University of British Columbia Press, a world-renowned publisher in the field, has adopted two management strategies – print on demand (POD) and short-run digital printing – to optimize its workflow and output. This report documents UBC Press’s objectives regarding both POD and short-run digital printing models and reviews the advantages and challenges posed by each. Based on this review, the report then speculates upon the future of digital scholarly publishing for UBC Press.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
John Maxwell
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: Publishing Program
Thesis type: 
(Project Report) M.Pub.

The culture of small press publishing in the Pacific Northwest

Author: 
Date created: 
2017-08-11
Abstract: 

This report focuses on small press publishing within the context of the Pacific Northwest and has been written in two sections. The first section traces the history of small press publishing in the North American continent, explores its current state of operations—especially within the Pacific Northwest community—lays down the features that set it apart from big press publishing, and highlights the various risks these small press publishers take to continue enriching literary diversity. The second section is a case study of Ronsdale Press as an example of a Pacific Northwest small press publisher. It traces the history of Ronsdale Press, then explores its current work flow and its identifying features, thus establishing it as an essential member of the Pacific Northwest small press publishing community.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Mauve Pagé
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: Publishing Program
Thesis type: 
(Project Report) M.Pub.

Venezuela’s media war: Coexistence and confrontation in the struggles of the Bolivarian Revolution

Author: 
Date created: 
2017-08-18
Abstract: 

In the midst of economic crisis and violent anti-government protests, the president of Venezuela, Nicolás Maduro, convoked a Constituent Assembly in May 2017. The initiative aims to transform the State and craft a new Constitution without consulting the Venezuelan people. The response of the population has intensified the division between government and opposition, generating unexpected turns that make it difficult for media to provide a proper and accurate coverage of events. This paper uses critical discourse analysis of newspaper’s articles and Twitter trending topics to suggest that these media platforms have constructed a dichotomy. This dichotomy addresses the Constituent Assembly as a victory for the Bolivarian Revolution, but a misfortune for the opposition. It also denotes the use linguistic means to validate the political ideology of the media platforms analyzed. I argue that this construction keeps fragmenting media spheres in Venezuela, perverting their role and fostering confrontation and inequality within both groups. A thorough study of the complexities of Venezuela’s political realm and an inter-political approach to transforming the legal framework are proposed to foster freedom of expression over the defense of political ideologies in media.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Katherine Reilly
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School of Communication
Thesis type: 
(Extended Essay) M.A.

Rise of the independent publisher: How Greystone Books rebuilt itself

Date created: 
2017-08-10
Abstract: 

After D&M Publishers filed for bankruptcy protection in 2012, Greystone Books relaunched as an independent publishing company in March 2013. In the time since, the company has not only picked up where it has left off, but has gone on to expand its operations in terms of staff, partnerships, and projects. Maintaining a consistent editorial direction involving different sources of publishing material, Greystone has kept costs to a manageable level, and has been able to build and grow business relationships that benefit both the publishing house and its partners. Its connections with other organizations as well as an established editorial brand have contributed to the company's survival. Greystone's business model and practices have shown how an independent publishing house can address the many challenges of a relaunch in the Canadian publishing industry.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
John Maxwell
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: Publishing Program
Thesis type: 
(Project Report) M.Pub.

Navigating Change: A Study of British Columbia University-College Governing Board Responses to the Change in Status from University-College to University

Date created: 
2017-05-24
Abstract: 

In 2007, a new report for the post-secondary education sector was released by the province of British Columbia referred to as “Campus 2020.” This review was the first comprehensive look at higher education in British Columbia in 45 years. A year later, because of recommendations made in the report, the University Amendment Act created five new “Special Purpose Teaching Universities.” There are not many new universities created in Canada and the research on how to become a university is scarce. Moreover, what happens with the university governance, the leadership, and the strategy after the institution has changed its status has not been studied. Specifically, the culture-senate-research equilibrium (that is foundational to the bicameral structure of most universities, but very different from the unicameral, centralized, and hierarchical structure of most colleges) is reviewed in this paper. The new universities had originally been created under the College and Institute Act, and they were changed by the University Amendment Act—with manifestly different mandates, structures, and roles. The purpose of this study was to examine how the boards of university-colleges and colleges affected by the new university Act interpreted their new legislative status and to determine whether there were differences among the boards of the different institutions in how they implemented the changes in status and mandate for their institutions. The research relies on a qualitative design based on document searches and on interviews from board members of the new universities (board chairs, CEOs, and long serving faculty board members), from former senior AVED Ministry personnel, and from the author of the Campus 2020 report. The key finding indicates that there was no common approach in how the boards led the changes required. There was little specific guidance provided to the boards by the BC government or by the Campus 2020 report: it appears the boards were left to struggle with many of the changes on their own.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Milton McClaren
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) Ed.D.

Nation Branding and Public Diplomacy in Argentina. Capitalist Insertion or Survival Strategies?

Date created: 
2017-08-03
Abstract: 

In the present global interdependent system, the relationship among Nation-States has intensified. In pursuit of capitalist insertion and to bolster their position in the national arena, governments have been implementing Nation Branding and Public Diplomacy strategies to attract investments, tourism and qualified labor. But under the inherent inequalities of the capitalist system, are underdeveloped countries truly jockeying for strategic positions or are they enacting strategies to ensure their own survival? This thesis combines Complex Interdependence Theory and Soft Power with Core-Periphery Theory to explain the nation branding and public diplomacy strategies of peripheral states. Argentina is the Nation-State selected to illustrate the struggles of a developing country facing the autonomy vs dependence choice and the implementation of international insertion strategies depending on the narrative different governments are aiming to portray. The period selected for analysis covers the last 4 administrations that followed the profound 2001 economic, political and social crisis in Argentina encompassing the administrations of Nestor and Cristina Kirchner and Mauricio Macri.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Katherine Reilly
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School of Communication
Thesis type: 
(Extended Essay) M.A.

Integrated Oceans Management Planning in Canada: An Evaluation of the Pacific North Coast Integrated Management Area Process

Date created: 
2017-08-28
Abstract: 

Over the past decade, there has been a surge of interest around the world in marine planning as an innovative approach to balancing sustainable development and conservation of the marine environment. In 2009, a marine planning process was initiated for a region called the Pacific North Coast Integrated Management Area (PNCIMA) in British Columbia, Canada. The final integrated oceans management plan for the PNCIMA was officially endorsed in February 2017. The collaborative planning process used to prepare the PNCIMA plan was evaluated using a multi-criteria evaluation method. The results show that the PNCIMA process had strengths and weaknesses: three of the twenty-six best practice criteria were met, thirteen were moderately met, and nine were unmet. Further, stakeholders reached consensus on some but not all elements of the PNCIMA plan. Recommendations are identified for design and management of future collaborative marine planning processes based on the PNCIMA evaluation.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Thomas Gunton
Department: 
Environment: School of Resource and Environmental Management
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.R.M. (Planning)

Editorial caricature representations of female political leaders in Jamaica: The case of Portia Simpson Miller

Date created: 
2017-08-30
Abstract: 

Women’s political participation has been the cause of much discussion globally. The points of contention and the intensity of these discussions vary across borders. However, issues of sexuality, the iron-fist woman versus the nurturing woman, the need for women to adapt to the machismo of the political system and leadership capabilities of females remain constant themes. In Jamaica these discussions were heightened in 2006 with the ascension of Jamaica’s first female Prime Minister, Portia Simpson Miller. Mainstream media vividly captured the gender discourse of the society through its editorial caricatures. This research paper will describe and analyse editorial caricature representations of female political leaders in Jamaica with particular focus on Portia Simpson Miller. The caricatures to be discussed will span 2006 to 2016. During this time Mrs Simpson Miller served as Jamaica’s first female Prime Minister from 2006 to 2007 and again from 2012 to 2016 when her party lost the general election. The literature review will cover perspectives on gender and sexism, women in leadership and media representation, which are explored in the context of the representation of women in politics in Jamaica.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Ellen Balka
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School of Communication
Thesis type: 
(Extended Essay) M.A.

Alternative media and alternative journalism: Theoretical approaches -AND- Alternative media: The life support of journalism in Turkey

Author: 
Date created: 
2017-08-23
Abstract: 

Essay 1: “Alternative Media and Alternative Journalism: Theoretical Approaches” sets the theoretical framework of two interrelated essays that seek to understand the democratic significance of alternative journalism in Turkey. The essay first examines the process- and content-oriented approaches outlining how they define alternative media and conceptualize alternative media’s democratizing potentials. Next, the essay presents some of the characteristics of alternative journalism such as native reporting and inverting the hierarchy of access as well as discussions around journalistic objectivity and funding in relation to the process- and content-oriented approaches. The essay argues that while different theorizations enable us to understand the democratic significance of alternative media and alternative journalism, in practice, they should not be used as a definitive criterion due to the dynamic and context -bound nature of alternative media. Communities and social movements may prioritize or combine these approaches depending on their needs and goals. Essay 2: “Alternative Media: The Life Support of Journalism in Turkey” applies the theories explored in the first essay to the Turkish context, focusing particularly on the period under the rule of the Adalet ve Kalkinma Partisi (The Justice and Development Party- AKP) which came to power in 2003.The essay argues that in the absence of a functioning mainstream media in Turkey, alternative media and alternative journalism take on the watchdog and information roles which are attributed to mainstream media in liberal theories. Furthermore, they act as a rhizome for different dissident groups and change the epistemology of traditional journalism by broadening the definition of news, adopting news values that are more relevant for their audiences and changing the sourcing routines. Finally, they offer a suitable venue of collaboration between scholars and activists in order to develop a more dynamic and responsible form of journalism.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Robert Hackett
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School of Communication
Thesis type: 
(Extended Essays) M.A.

Are community radios democratically organized? An analysis of Vancouver Co-operative Radio

Author: 
Date created: 
2017-08-21
Abstract: 

Community radio is believed to have the potential to advance participatory communication, and therefore to promote social democracy. This research asks whether community radios are democratically organized in the realization of their mandate to promote wider community democratization. Through the case study of Vancouver Co- operative Radio, how community radios organized themselves and what challenges for democratic organizations in practice are discussed.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Katherine Reilly
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School of Communication
Thesis type: 
(Extended Essay) M.A.