Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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This collection contains digitized SFU theses except for those theses submitted within the last 12 months. If you cannot find the thesis you are looking for please search Recently Submitted Theses as it may be a recently submitted thesis and thus not yet available in Summit.

Library is the new publisher: Establishing workflows for library-based open educational resource production programs in post-secondary institutions across Canada and the United States

Author: 
Date created: 
2018-12-13
Abstract: 

As a response to increasing costs of textbooks for college students, post-secondary institutions are exploring new methods to make learning materials affordable for students. This has resulted in a surge of interest in the concept of open educational resources (OER), or freely accessible learning materials, the most prominent of which is the open textbook. Post-secondary institutions have begun to start their own OER production programs, often staffed by librarians and run through an institutional library. As the work that was traditionally done by publishers begins to move into the academic space, new OER coordinators are searching for answers for how to successfully run an OER production program. This report is an analysis of the workflows of six OER production programs run through the libraries of post-secondary institutions in the United States and Canada, and stands a record that can be built upon in the future in the efforts to formulate a standardized approach to running a successful OER production program using Pressbooks’ book production and distribution software.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Hannah McGregor
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: Publishing Program
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.Pub.

Distilling the Canadian Copyright Review 2018: One publisher's path through Canadian copyright and Canadian Coursepacks

Author: 
Date created: 
2018-12-17
Abstract: 

This report examines current academic publishing market in the light of the ongoing Statutory Review of Copyright Act of Canada (2018), and reconciles the testimonies presented before the review committee by the industry stakeholders. It focuses on the impact on academic publishing since the Copyright Modernization Act (2012) came into effect, which resulted in the education sector opting out of Access Copyright tariff. The report identifies the key concerns of the independent Canadian publishers: publishers’ and authors’ losses, interpretation of fair dealing guidelines, digital shift in content acquisition, institutional expenditure on Canadian content and the economics of digital environment. The report evaluates if a partnership between an independent Canadian publisher like Arsenal Pulp Press and an upcoming publishers’ consortium called the Canadian Coursepacks can help publishers recapture their academic sales revenues. The report highlights the future concerns for independent publishers in the absence of collective licensing and a need for publishers to re-think their distribution strategies, especially their sub-licensing agreements.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Suzanne Norman
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: Publishing Program
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.Pub.

Robot following ahead of the leader and learning human-relevant navigational cues

Author: 
Date created: 
2018-12-17
Abstract: 

As robots become more involved in our everyday lives, we may find it useful to design new methods to interact with them. In this thesis, we design two applications to facilitate human-robot interaction. The first application is an autonomous mobile robot that follows a walking user while staying ahead of them. Despite several useful applications for autonomous push-carts, this problem has received much less attention than the easier problem of following from behind. In contrast to previous work, we use multi-modal person detection and a human-motion model that considers obstacles to predict the future path of the user. We implement the system with a modular architecture of an obstacle mapper, a human tracker, a human motion model, a robot motion planner and a robot motion controller. We report on the performance of the robot in real world experiments. We believe that approaches to this largely overlooked problem could be useful in real industrial, domestic and entertainment applications in the near future. The second application is a novel system for describing the navigational cues ahead of the robot. We train a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) architecture on 2D LiDAR data and occupancy grid maps to detect navigational objects during robot movement through an indoor environment. These navigational objects include closed-rooms (room with closed doors), open-rooms (room with open doors) and intersections. On top of this network, our system uses a tracking module that improves the detection accuracy of the system by clustering and recording each detection of the model. This tracking module also enables us to describe the robot navigational cues. We evaluate the system in both simulation and the real world. We compare the combination of 2D LiDAR data and occupancy grid maps and using each of them alone.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Richard Vaughan
Department: 
Applied Sciences: School of Computing Science
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.Sc.

Memories For The Future

Author: 
Date created: 
2018-09-10
Abstract: 

Memories For The Future is a wall-mounted photographic and sculptural installation emerging from my archive of affective family snapshots from the 1990s and 2000s. Everyday textiles, bodily substances, and shadows are abstracted from these fragmented photographs to form accompanying wooden cut-outs. This doubling adheres to the more classic Freudian notion of the uncanny, being a thing or event encountered in a psychologically unsettling context. The unsettling childhood narratives display private desires, passionate behaviours and domestic situations, first as photographic spectacles, and more recently as aesthetic objects in a gallery setting. The absurd child recognizes how objects, places, and thoughts become invested with both happiness and unhappiness. The project thus rejects good cheer and common sense to delight in the abject nature of point-and-shoot photography, reflecting another side of photography, in relation to today’s performative selfie culture.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Sabine Bitter
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School for the Contemporary Arts
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.F.A.

Partial stratification in capture-recapture experiments and integrated population modeling with radio telemetry

Date created: 
2018-12-19
Abstract: 

In this thesis, we develop and apply three new methods for ecological data sets. We present two new developments related to capture-recapture studies and one development related to integrated population modeling. In the first project, we present new methods using partial stratification in two-sample capture-recapture experiments for closed populations. Capture heterogeneity is known to cause bias in estimates of abundance in capture-recapture experiments. This heterogeneity is often related to observable fixed characteristics of the animals such as sex. If this information can be observed for each handled animal at both sample occasions, then it is straightforward to stratify (e.g. by sex) and obtain stratum-specific estimates. However in many fishery experiments it is difficult to sex all captured fish because morphological differences are slight or because of logistic constraints. In these cases, a sub-sample of the captured fish at each sample occasion is selected and additional and often more costly measurements are made, such as sex determination through sacrificing the fish. We develop new methods to estimate abundance for these types of experiments. Furthermore, we develop methods for optimal allocation of effort for a given cost. We also develop methods to account for additional information (e.g. prior information about the sex ratio) and for supplemental continuous covariates such as length. These methods are applied to a problem of estimating the size of the walleye population in Mille Lacs Lake Minnesota, USA. In the second project, we present new methods using partial stratification in k-sample (k>=2) capture-recapture experiments of a closed population with known losses on capture to estimate abundance. We present the new methods for large populations using maximum likelihood and a Bayesian method and simulated data with known losses on capture was used to illustrate the new methods. In the third project, we present an integrated population model using capture-recapture, dead recovery, snorkel, and radio telemetry surveys. We apply this model to Chinook salmon on the West Coast of Vancouver Island, Canada to estimate spawning escapement and to describe the movement from the ocean to spawning grounds considering the stopover time, stream residence time, and snorkel survey observer efficiency.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Carl Schwarz
Department: 
Science: Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) Ph.D.

Circadian food anticipatory activity across the seasons: The relationship between feeding schedules and photoperiod in mice

Author: 
Date created: 
2018-12-14
Abstract: 

Daily feeding schedules induce circadian rhythms of food anticipatory activity (FAA) by entrainment of circadian oscillators outside of the master light-entrainable pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Efforts to localize these food-entrainable oscillators (FEOs) and specify molecular mechanisms have been complicated by the wide range of non-circadian factors that can modulate expression of food-motivated behaviours. Here, we examine the effect of photoperiod (duration of the daily light period) on FAA induced in mice by restricting food to a 4h daily meal in the light period, the usual rest phase in nocturnal rodents.To express FAA in the light period, FEOs must compete with SCN clock outputs, which normally suppress activity and promote sleep at this time of day. Photoperiod modifies both the period () and amplitude of the SCN pacemaker, as indicated by aftereffects of long and short days on  and on the phase shift response to light pulses in constant dark (DD). Exposure to long days is thought to reduce SCN amplitude, and would be expected to permit greater FAA to a daytime meal. To test this prediction, mice were entrained to a 16h light:8h dark (L16) or L8 cycle, with or without running discs, and then maintained in DD for 2 weeks. Mice previously entrained to L16 exhibited a shorter  and smaller phase shift to light in DD, confirming an effect of photoperiod on the SCN pacemaker. After re-entrainment to L16 or L8, food was restricted to the last 4h of the light period. FAA was enhanced in L16 in mice with running discs, but the difference was reversed in mice without running discs. Additional groups of mice were entrained to L18, L16, L12 or L8, and the 4h daily meal was centered in the light period. Prior to restricted feeding, photoperiod modified parameters of the light-entrained rhythms as expected. During restricted feeding, there was no systematic effect of photoperiod on FAA. After restricted feeding, an aftereffect of photoperiod on  in DD was absent. Centering of daily mealtime in the light period may block the effect of photoperiod on the SCN pacemaker, and thereby eliminate the potential impact of day length on the expression of FAA to daytime meals.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Ralph Mistlberger
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Psychology
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

Survival mode: Mothers’ perceptions of implementing physician’s recommendations for paediatric sleep-care

Author: 
Date created: 
2018-12-14
Abstract: 

Paediatric sleep problems are pervasive and affect optimal development. Although evidence-based treatments are available, clinical experience suggests that they are not effectively translated into practice. The experience of the clinicians at the Sleep-/Wake Behaviour Clinic at Sunny Hill Children’s Health Centre (BC Children’s Hospital) suggested that well-validated treatment protocols were not translating into clinical successes with their patients. A preliminary study in Kamloops showed that families were not implementing physicians’ recommendations for sleep-care, which raised questions about was preventing them from doing so. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to understand a) mother’s experience managing their child’s sleep problem in the context of the BC healthcare system and family; and, b) describe the meanings they make from these experiences, and in turn, how these inform mothers’ reactions to physician’s sleep-care recommendations. Mothers seeking sleep-care support from the Kamloops Paediatric Sleep Clinic were interviewed about their experiences implementing recommendations and the barriers they faced. Through an iterative process of theoretical sampling, memoing, and on-going review of the literature, I constructed a theoretical process model of mothers’ experience managing their child’s sleep problem entitled “Surival Mode.” This nascent theory was validated through negative case analysis, flip-flop techniques and member-checking, until I was satisfied that it “fit” and was a “useful” model from the participants’ perspective. Understanding the meaning of sleep problems for mothers, and the factors underlying adherence with sleep recommendations, may help increase intervention success and, inform policy/program development.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Lucy LeMare
Sharalyn Jordan
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

Black onyx : Emotional responses to music and sounds

Author: 
Date created: 
2018-11-30
Abstract: 

Black Onyx is a musical concert work for flute, cello and piano with electronics. The piece has five sections of music and sounds targeting five human emotions: Anger, Sadness, Surprise, Contempt and Fear. Some sections are written in reference to memory and the practice of music therapy. The entire work is based on research of music psychology including the psychological Circumplex model developed by James A. Russell. The work invites the attention of the listener to the auditory world of mental illness and human sufferings to create atmospheres of negative emotional responses. By the end of the performance, the psychological atmosphere shifts to positivity. The five human emotions are the primary focus of this project, both in terms of induction and perception. The individual listening experiences, such as feelings of tension and calm are left to the listener.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
Senior supervisor: 
Owen Underhill
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School for the Contemporary Arts
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.F.A.

The Medicine Wheel and the transference of Indigenous knowledge from grandmother to granddaughter - AND - The power of words and Medicine Wheel teachings as a tool for decolonization

Date created: 
2018-11-28
Abstract: 

Essay 1: For four decades, Marjorie Mackie facilitated a Medicine Wheel workshop that she, herself developed for therapeutic purposes in the treatment of alcohol and drug addiction amongst Indigenous peoples. The research for this paper was done in an interview format between Marjorie, my grandmother, and I. This paper reflects a co-creation process resulting in my grandmother passing her knowledge of the Medicine Wheel on to me. This paper demonstrates several things: 1. The relationship between my grandmother and I; 2. The responsibility I have shown as the researcher to honour my grandmother and her teachings; 3. The passing of knowledge from an elder to the next generation; 4. The Medicine Wheel teachings themselves, which serve as a moral guide to a well-lived life; and 5. My grandmother’s work with the Medicine Wheel as intellectual labour. Essay 2: It is vital to explore not only the history of words and their effects, but to also explore how an understanding of words can be used to decolonize language. This paper examines some of the ideas found within the Medicine Wheel. These ideas are not meant to be kept in the abstract, but to be applied to one’s own life in order to achieve wholeness and peace of mind, body and spirit. As an Indigenous woman working with her Grandmother in order to learn and to explore Medicine Wheel teachings, understanding the power of words and their impacts is essential because it prevents the projection of false beliefs and myths onto the teachings. My exploration of language and the Medicine Wheel is accomplished through both a westernized lens and through an Indigenous lens. I consider and use western academic discussions of discourse, structuralism and myth in combination with affirming the historical trauma associated with being Indigenous, as well as Indigenous storytelling, spirituality and community. The process of deconstructing language and myth in my own life is a journey of both frustration and healing. The discovery of the ways in which false belief systems have impacted my life and my understanding of the Medicine Wheel has left me with an acceptance of personal responsibility in knowing that I alone, choose what to allow into my consciousness and that which I choose to release. This Essay is a journey of healing and of understanding. It is a journey of self-acceptance and personal responsibility. To decolonize language is to decolonize one’s own heart and in doing so the journey continues.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Alison Beale
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School of Communication
Thesis type: 
(Extended Essays) M.A.

Utopian visions of small city transformation: The challenge and potential of enacting small city cultural sustainability agendas in an age of globalization, and against the backdrop of the creative cities phenomenon.

Author: 
Date created: 
2018-12-12
Abstract: 

Amidst a rising tide of awareness surrounding the unsustainable futures facing cities large and small, theorists and practitioners alike are turning to culture as a way to understand and foster new possibilities surrounding sustainable development. Small cities are seen by some to cultivate, by nature of their size and the kinds of connectivity they engender, unique understandings of the value of culture. While not all small cities offer progressive understandings of cultural sustainability, many are working with these concepts in progressive and innovative ways. This dissertation seeks to unpack the phenomenon of cultural sustainability – examining its relationship with the creative cities phenomenon of the 1990’s/2000’s, and with the over-arching logics posed by the larger forces of neoliberal globalization. It looks at the ways in which cultural sustainability agendas are being implemented by governments within municipal small city contexts – the empirical portion of this study conducting case studies analysis, including documentary research, interviews and critical analysis, of the British Columbian (Canadian) small cities of Prince George, Kelowna and Kamloops. Through this research I explore a potential paradigmatic shift – from Creative Cities to Sustainable Creative Cities. I probe at the differences between these two world-views, and ask how leaders intent on activating new holistic and future-conscious forms of development might conceptualize culture’s sustainable development role. Within this journey, I recognize a unique potential within small cities, in particular, for the formation of new approaches to sustainable cultural development – acknowledging their place on the margins of dominant municipal leadership practice and their subsequent potential capacity for innovation and change. Here I uncover significant challenges, as well as ‘glimmers of hope’, as these cities struggle to actualize culture’s sustainable development potential.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Stuart Poyntz
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School of Communication
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) Ph.D.