Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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This collection contains digitized SFU theses except for those theses submitted within the last 12 months. If you cannot find the thesis you are looking for please search Recently Submitted Theses as it may be a recently submitted thesis and thus not yet available in Summit.

Collaboration and Creation: Developing a digital space for Wellbeing at UBC.

Date created: 
2017-12-11
Abstract: 

This report explores the process of developing and publishing a multi-stakeholder website for UBC Wellbeing, effectively creating a unified digital space for efforts connected to UBC’s vision to become a health-promoting university. This multi-phase process depended heavily on collaboration and consultation at every phase of the site design and deployment, as well as during the initial development of wellbeing communication tools and resources that formed the basis of the site content.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
John Maxwell
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: Publishing Program
Thesis type: 
(Project Report) M.Pub.

Because We Are Used To Living

Author: 
Date created: 
2017-12-01
Abstract: 

BecauseWeAreUsedToLiving is a mediated performance that explores the parasitic process of its own creation. Parasites are often performing, reading their host’s movements like a script in order to gain access into their carefully guarded boundaries. Once inside, the parasite can gradually throw off the hosting body’s equilibrium, triggering feedback loops of systemic dissonance. Parasites are often documenting, investigating their host’s bodies like auditors in order to find refuge within their highly organized machinery. Once incorporated, the parasite can merge with its host, spontaneously giving rise to ecological novelty. BecauseWeAreUsedToLiving is host to its own parasitism; through a network of precarious wormholes it feeds off itself across time. Using video, music, installation, text, and performance, the work presents its own process of transformation, which occurs across disciplinary and temporal boundaries. Through a methodological framework that is based on parasitic strategies of performance and documentation, BecauseWeAreUsedToLiving seeks to gain access to alternate universes.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
This video features a re-enactment of a meeting between David Biddle and Linda Fox. The meeting took place in "Stanley Park".
This video features a customer testimonial for a virtual reality experience called "Lep-E Alternatives™".
Senior supervisor: 
Judy Radul
Steven Hill
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School for the Contemporary Arts
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.F.A.

Evaluation of the Regulatory Review Process for Pipeline Expansion in Canada: A Case Study of the Trans Mountain Expansion Project

Author: 
Date created: 
2017-04-25
Abstract: 

A good review process ensures government agencies approve projects which are in the public's interest and reject those that are not. Recently, the Canadian review process for pipelines has undergone scrutiny with numerous studies pointing to major flaws. This report presents a case study evaluation of the regulatory review and approval process for the Trans Mountain Expansion Project. The Project review process led by the National Energy Board is evaluated relative to nine best practices based on a survey of intervenors in the hearings. The main conclusion is that the review process does not meet any of the best practices and is deficient. Even so, intervenors largely agreed on how it could be improved. The results are also compared to a similar study evaluating the Enbridge Northern Gateway Project Joint Review Process, and the conclusions attained were similar. This report aims to contribute to improving the Canadian review process.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Thomas Gunton
Department: 
Environment: School of Resource and Environmental Management
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.R.M. (Planning)

An Inside Look at “Quietly” Helping MEC Launch Good Times Outside

Author: 
Date created: 
2017-12-14
Abstract: 

This report examines content marketing and its role at various stages of the customer journey. It addresses how Quietly, a Vancouver-based content marketing agency, assists companies in creating data-driven content to support their marketing initiatives. Specifically, this report focuses on a content-centric marketing campaign—Good Times Outside (GTO)—that was launched by Mountain Equipment Co-op (MEC) in June 2017. It discusses the strategic production of content that was published on a campaign-specific microsite: a total of 179 activity and event pages. It considers MEC’s business goals and the main aims of this particular project. It revisits the research and strategy that was developed to refine content and site layout ideas, and examines Quietly’s role in the creation and distribution of the content for the site. It also addresses MEC’s revised content marketing plan with the incorporation of GTO. All figures and statistics are accurate as of October 2017.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Leanne Johnson
Scott Steedman
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: Publishing Program
Thesis type: 
(Project Report) M.Pub.

Cultural Values in Cumulative Effects Management: A Case Study with the Metlakatla First Nation

Date created: 
2017-08-28
Abstract: 

Conventional approaches to environmental impact assessment and cumulative effects assessment (CEA) have largely failed to incorporate the cultural values of Aboriginal communities and have inadequately addressed the negative impacts of development on these values. The main objective of this study is to develop and demonstrate an improved methodology for identifying and assessing cultural values to inform CEA and other decision-making processes. After reviewing the major weaknesses and recommendations discussed in the literature on CEA and cultural values, I describe the new method and demonstrate its application as part of an innovative cumulative effects management program instituted by the Metlakatla First Nation for their traditional territory in northwestern British Columbia. I compare my results with the results of a recent conventional assessment conducted for the Pacific NorthWest LNG Project in Metlakatla territory. The new method provides useful information to support Metlakatla efforts to maintain their culture, language, and practices.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Murray Rutherford
Tom Gunton
Department: 
Environment: School of Resource and Environmental Management
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.R.M. (Planning)

At the intersection of identity and the body: One woman’s experience of disability and sexuality

Date created: 
2017-12-11
Abstract: 

This study sought to understand the ways in which the intersections of sexuality, disability, and identity are experienced and understood by one woman living with cerebral palsy. The central research question for this thesis will ask: “How do women with cerebral palsy narrate their lived experience of disability and sexuality?” Through interviews conducted using Arvay’s (2002) narrative method of analysis, a narrative was co constructed to explore the experience of negotiating one’s identity as a sexual being while living with cerebral palsy. A thematic analysis revealed three key processes which facilitated an understanding of one’s self as a sexual being: the identity formation process, the relationship formation process, and the development of a disability identity.This research provides a rich and contextualized account of the intersectional nature of identity and the impact of occupying multiple marginalized positions on one woman’s lived experience with disability and sexuality.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Sharalyn Jordan
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

A Deeper Dive into the Cookbook Buyer: An Analysis of BookNet Canada Data and the Cookbook Industry

Date created: 
2017-12-12
Abstract: 

Publishers rely on accurate sales data to make informed decisions about the books they publish, but how useful can that data be when the reporting systems that create it are incomplete? This report takes a granular look at the Canadian cookbook industry through the sales reporting and consumer surveys provided by BookNet Canada to see how accurately those systems reflect the reality of cookbook sales in Canada. Cookbooks are one of many specialty genres in the publishing spectrum that have unique sales channel distributions, which makes it difficult to make sweeping generalizations about their consumers. By transposing information from BookNet Canada’s SalesData and Deep Dive reports with Penguin Random House’s internal data to illuminate discrepancies, this report provides a more holistic snapshot of the genre and its consumers. It is a direct response to a 2016 report from BookNet Canada called The Deep Dive: The Cookbook Buyer.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
John Maxwell
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: Publishing Program
Thesis type: 
(Project Report) M.Pub.

Young children’s understanding of angles in a dynamic geometry environment

Author: 
Date created: 
2017-11-27
Abstract: 

Angle is an important topic in geometry. It is a concept that children find challenging to learn, in part because of its multifaceted nature. The purpose of this study is to understand how children’s thinking about angles evolves as they participate in a classroom setting featuring the use of a dynamic geometry environment (DGE) in which the concept of angle as turn was privileged, a concept that does not require a quantitative dimension. Three research questions were proposed for the study, addressing respectively: (1) the different conceptions of angles developed by the children; (2) contributions of the DGE (The Geometer’s Sketchpad) to children’s developing conceptions of angles; (3) the kinds of discourse in which children engage. The participants in the study were 20 kindergarten/grade 1 children (aged 5-6) along with their class teacher. The data consist of video recordings of nine classroom sessions around angles conducted by the class teacher. Sfard’s (2008) commognitive framework was used to analyse the data focusing mainly on her four characteristics of mathematics discourse, which are word use, visual mediators, routines, and narratives. The children’s gestures were also taken as a significant aspect of their discourse. This study highlights the importance of gestures and motion in children’s developing conceptions of angles. It presents implications of considering young children’s embodied forms of communications along with their verbal communication for understanding their mathematical thinking. Extending prior research on children’s difficulties in unifying static and dynamic conceptions of angles, this study provides one way of establishing a relationship between angle-as-turn and angle-as-shape conceptions.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Nathalie Sinclair
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) Ph.D.

Psychological functioning and bereavement care needs of bereaved Chinese immigrants in Canada

Date created: 
2017-12-12
Abstract: 

The death of a loved one can be associated with significant physical and psychological morbidity for bereaved individuals. Bereavement care services aim to foster healthy adjustment to loss. Research and clinical observations, however, suggest that such services are under-utilized by ethnic minorities and immigrants. Using a mixed methods design, the current research examined the psychological functioning of bereaved Chinese-Canadian immigrants, and factors related to their access and utilization of bereavement care. Twenty-five first-generation Chinese-Canadian immigrants from Hong Kong, Taiwan, or Mainland China, who had been bereaved for 6 months to 3 years, completed Chinese-translated questionnaires on depression, anxiety, somatic symptoms, coping, and acculturation. Semi-structured interviews focused on their grief experiences, knowledge and experiences with bereavement care, and perception on barriers to access and ways to improve services. Quantitative results revealed that over half of the participants scored above clinical cut-offs on depression (56%), state anxiety (60%) and trait anxiety (64%). Eight themes emerged from the qualitative data. Chinese cultural grammar, being an immigrant in a foreign land, and navigating uncharted territories in a foreign health care system represented contextual forces that interacted to form barriers to accessing bereavement care. Bereavement as a lonely journey represented the core concern of the participants, with coping strategies, religion and spirituality, post-loss changes and growth, and ideal services emerging as outcome categories. Combined analyses on quantitative and qualitative data found that those displaying intense grief during interview also scored higher on depression and state anxiety. Emotion-oriented coping was associated with poorer psychological functioning, while taking solace in “good death”, cognitive reframing and discussing the loss with family predicted better adjustment. Those whose family members passed away in Canada or had received palliative care prior to death were more likely to receive pre-bereavement and/or bereavement follow-up care. Psychological morbidity and lack of discussion of grief with family were associated with increased initiative to seek professional help. Initiative to seek help, together with psychological morbidity, predicted subsequent access to bereavement interventions.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
David Cox
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Psychology
Thesis type: 
(Dissertation) Ph.D.

Ranking and prediction for Cycling Canada

Author: 
Date created: 
2017-12-14
Abstract: 

In efforts to improve Canadian performance in the men's Elite UCI Mountain Bike World Cup, researchers from the Canadian Sport Institute Ontario (CSIO) presented to us a specific problem. They had a wealth of race data but were unsure how to best extract insights from the dataset. We responded to their request by building an interactive user interface with R Shiny to obtain rider rankings. Estimation was carried out via maximum likelihood using the Bradley-Terry model. We improved on the existing literature, proposed an exponentially weighted version of the model, and determined an optimal weighting parameter through cross-validation involving performance of future races. Therefore, the proposed methods provide forecasting capability. The tuned Bradley-Terry estimation performed better than the UCI point-based ranking in terms of predictive error. This implementation of the Bradley-Terry model with a user-friendly graphical interface provides broader scientific audiences easy access to Bradley-Terry ranking for prediction in racing sports.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Tim Swartz
Department: 
Science: Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.Sc.