Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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This collection contains digitized SFU theses except for those theses submitted within the last 12 months. If you cannot find the thesis you are looking for please search Recently Submitted Theses as it may be a recently submitted thesis and thus not yet available in Summit.

Evaluating the role of zoos and ex situ conservation in global amphibian recovery

Date created: 
2017-10-12
Abstract: 

Amphibians are declining worldwide, and ex situ approaches (e.g. captive breeding and reintroduction) are increasingly incorporated into recovery strategies. Nonetheless, it is unclear whether these approaches are helping mitigate losses. To investigate this, I examine the conservation value of captive collections. I find that collections do not reflect the species of likeliest greatest concern in the future but that non-traditional zoos and conservation-focused breeding programs are bolstering the representation of threatened amphibians held ex situ. Next, I examine the reproductive success of captive breeding programs in relation to species’ biological traits and extrinsic traits of the program. Based on 285 programs, I find that not all species are breeding in captivity, yet success is not correlated to the suite of tested predictors. Overall, ex situ approaches are playing a potentially important role in amphibian conservation, but we must work to improve the representation of threatened amphibians in zoos and husbandry expertise.

Document type: 
Thesis
Senior supervisor: 
Arne Mooers
Department: 
Science: Biological Sciences Department
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.Sc.

The Impact of One School Community on Female Refugee Adolescents and their Sense of Belonging

Date created: 
2017-12-08
Abstract: 

AbstractEducation is believed to play an essential role in creating a sense of belongingamongst adolescents from refugee backgrounds. This narrative inquiry study setsout to better understand the influence one Canadian school community plays inseven female adolescent students’ sense of belonging. Data were collected over afive-month period through two sets of interviews, observations and an art project.Findings indicate that a sense of belonging is best fostered by positiveteacher-student and peer relationships, the opportunity for youth to get involved inpositive ways within their school community, and through the availability andaccessibility of support services. Sense of belonging was inhibited by language andcultural barriers, as well as limited availability of support services. The femaleexperience was further challenged by familial responsibilities which limitedopportunities to participate in the wider school community.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Dr Margaret MacDonald
Dr Wanda Cassidy
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

Art teacher in process: An illustrated exploration of art, education and what matters

Author: 
Date created: 
2017-12-08
Abstract: 

This thesis is a graphic autobiographical inquiry in comic book form.  The thesis explores personal experiences and reflections of an early-career secondary public-school art teacher in the process of understanding and developing her artistic, teaching and inquiry practices. The visual form of inquiry supports the exploration, reimagining, and representation of the author’s perspective and learning related to art education and teaching including: relationships within and outside of the school context; the experiences and daily practices of the teacher; the importance of form and medium; visual literacy; scholarship; and the aims of art education. The importance of multiple scholarly representations of knowledge is a central theme, with emphasis on an understanding of the graphic form as an action site of inquiry and communication. Through open and empathetic representations of teacher-student interactions, the author advocates for students’ meaningful engagement with the arts, and for the creation of spaces in which students and art educators may imagine and create new possibilities for themselves and the worlds within which they live and co-create.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Lynn Fels
Michael Ling
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

Emissions Trading vs. Carbon Taxes: What Gets Us Closer to a Zero Emissions Future? Lessons from European Implementations

Author: 
Date created: 
2017-12-19
Abstract: 

In 2017, following the Paris Agreement, the current federal government changed Canada’s stance on climate change policy by requiring provinces to implement their own carbon pricing mechanisms by 2018. The provinces are to choose between Carbon Taxes and Emissions Trading Systems. I ask which produces the best results for provinces who have not yet implemented pricing. Using Denmark, Norway, Ireland, and Spain, along with the European Union Emissions Trading System I assess the results these mechanisms have produced over an extended period of time. I find that emission reductions across jurisdictions are inconsistent but provide policy lessons for Canada, both federally and provincially. I also find that federalism in Canada provides its own toughest challenges when it comes to the implementation of consistent policies. As global pressure intensifies on carbon mitigation and emissions reduction, I find three types of costs for the federal government’s consideration to reduce its carbon footprint.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Anil Hira
Andrew Heard
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Political Science
Thesis type: 
(Research Project) M.A.

Fungal Pathogens of Wasabi in British Columbia

Date created: 
2017-11-06
Abstract: 

Wasabi (Wasabia japonica L.) is a high-value crop in British Columbia and is cultivated in greenhouses where diseases cause economic losses and insect pest issues are emerging. A review of the current literature on wasabi reveals a lack of information on wasabi pest and disease management, especially in North America. The objective of this research was to identify current diseases affecting wasabi in BC isolates from plants showing symptoms of leaf blight, leaf spot, and white blister rust were identified by molecular and morphological methods. Results revealed that Botrytis cinerea, Collectotrichum higginsianum, and Albugo candida were present. Inoculation studies showed B. cinerea was weakly pathogenic, while C. higginsianum caused lesions on wasabi and Brassica juncea, but not on alfalfa (Medicago sativa). In culture, fastest growth of C. higginsianum occurred at 25 and 30°C, and the highest conidial production occurred under continuous darkness. Isolates of A. candida from shepherd’s purse (Capsella bursa-pastoris) plants were identical to those from wasabi, suggesting a source of inoculum. Disease control in an integrated pest management system will remain an important aspect of mitigating economic losses.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Zamir Punja
Department: 
Science: Biological Sciences Department
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.P.M.

Fostering well-being with secondary students through a mindfulness and yoga program: A mixed methods study of emotion regulation and perceived stress

Date created: 
2017-11-29
Abstract: 

Mindfulness in schools has emerged over the past few years as an intervention strategy for increasing emotional awareness and emotion regulation and managing student stress. However, in the literature, the affordances and constraints of introducing mindfulness in schools to improve youth well-being has received little attention. This research aims to address this gap by exploring the feasibility and benefits of using mindfulness and yoga to foster well-being (i.e., greater emotion regulation and less perceived stress) among secondary school students. For the purposes of this study, mindfulness is defined as a present-moment, non-judgmental attention and awareness of the ongoing activity of internal and external stimuli. Two phases of this study focused on developing action initiatives for a Youth Wellness Program (YWP) and examining the effects of youth participation on emotion regulation and stress using a mixed-methods convergent design. A collaborative approach to fostering well-being combined participant feedback with mindfulness education to inform the development of a relevant and effective program. Twenty-nine secondary students participated in eight 45-minute mindfulness sessions and eight 45-minute yoga sessions during lunch and after school hours over eight weeks. Four additional weeks of 45-minute sessions that combined mindfulness and yoga were optional and attended by 23 participants. Participants completed measures at three points in time: pre-intervention, during the intervention and post-intervention. It was expected that participation in the mindfulness- and yoga-based program would yield an increase in emotion regulation and a decrease in perceived stress among participants. Quantitative results indicated that an improvement in emotion regulation, perceived stress, self-regulation, mindfulness and perceptions of well-being was observed as a result of participation in the YWP for all participants. There was a negative correlation between mindfulness and emotion regulation indicating that as mindfulness increased difficulty in emotion regulation decreased. The baseline measure of positive youth development (i.e., measures of self-confidence and empathy) revealed that the junior grade level participants had higher than average empathy prior to the YWP while self-confidence was similar between the two grade levels (junior and senior) in terms of comparison. Qualitative analyses of the participants’ feedback yielded eight categories with 21 themes and 107 sub-themes that reflected and provided a deeper understanding of the improvements found in the quantitative data. The implications of these findings for education and future research are discussed.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Susan O'Neill
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) Ph.D.

Clifford Moves Online: The History and Future of Scholastic Reading Club

Date created: 
2017-12-20
Abstract: 

Scholastic Canada has been running Reading Club in Canadian schools for half a century. Until 1998, teachers were only able to place student orders by mail or over the phone. Then, the first Canadian Reading Club website was created with a web form for teachers to submit orders online. The online form marked the start of a major change that has been brewing for Reading Club over the last two decades, but it wouldn’t be until 2016 that this simple form would be replaced by a fully-functioning e-commerce website. As Scholastic Canada moves Reading Club online, the company must maintain its valued relationship with teachers and protect its unique place in Canadian classrooms, while at the same time seeking out opportunities to grow in its new digital context. This report looks at the history of Scholastic Incorporated to illustrate how the company founded its vital relationship with schools and teachers and built its successful distribution networks. The report then focuses in on Scholastic Canada’s Reading Club division, delving into the changes that are rapidly occurring as the clubs are moved online.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Hannah McGregor
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: Publishing Program
Thesis type: 
(Project Report) M.Pub.

Other Inland Empires

Author: 
Date created: 
2017-11-21
Abstract: 

Shimmering between here/there, self/other, now/then, Other Inland Empires is a stage performance which traces the Jewish roots of surf culture from Europe to California and back again. Inspired equally by historical coincidence, autoethnographic field work, and exploration of site, the piece was developed through 14 months of writing and devising. With palm trees, fabric, and a roving green screen, four actors, an in-audience musician, and a director-performer transform a bare stage into a shifting landscape, while the audience watches from the comfort of beach chairs. Drawing from strategies of postdramatic theater, performative autoethnography, and audience relations to installation and site-based performance, this work aimed to create an oscillating space in which story and image double and re-double upon themselves, the fictional interrupts the real, and the personal grazes the political.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Video documentation of Other Inland Empires performed October 6, 2017 at Studio T at SFU's Goldcorp Centre for the Arts
Senior supervisor: 
Steven Hill
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School for the Contemporary Arts
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.F.A.

Opening the Doors to Knowledge: Rebus’ Collaborative Publishing Model for Open Textbooks

Author: 
Date created: 
2017-12-20
Abstract: 

Over the last thirty years, the cost of education has become prohibitively expensive, both in terms of tuition and with reference to rising textbook costs. In response, organizations such as the Rebus Foundation are working towards the development of scalable models of Open Textbook creation. This report outlines, examines, and critiques Rebus’ efforts. It historicizes the Open Education Movement, and delineates Rebus’ role within the current textbook publishing landscape. Concentrating on the Rebus Community Forum, it initially evaluates the organization’s acquisitions and editorial practices with a focus on avenues for improvement. Moving along the Open Textbook production line, it examines issues related to peer review and accessibility, before understanding Rebus’ attempts to market, promote, and update its Open Textbooks after publication. Collectively, these efforts attempt to transform educational publishing into a more equitable space.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Hannah McGregor
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: Publishing Program
Thesis type: 
(Project Report) M.Pub.

The Living Surfaces #2: Rhythmic Wanders

Date created: 
2017-11-23
Abstract: 

The Living Surfaces #2 – Rhythmic Wanders is the second of a series of video art projects that uses the projection mapping technique to make projections over sculptures created together with the projected content. In addition, these projects bring up questions regarding spatiality, musicality, movement, performativity and narrativity. In Rhythmic Wanders, I create an interactive multichannel video installation in which a sequence of 8 independent music video loops are projected over four sculptures used as a tridimensional screen. The music videos consist of a collection of beats, melodies and environments, collected from meetings with musicians I met in Canada, Brazil and the United States. Images and sounds, themselves derived from my affective memories of those location as well as my relations with the musicians, are assembled algorithmically as the visitor(s) wander(s) around the installation space filled with strategically positioned presence sensors.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
The Living Surfaces# 2: Rhythmic Wanders - Installation's video documentation
Senior supervisor: 
Arne Eigenfeldt
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School for the Contemporary Arts
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.F.A.