Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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This collection contains digitized SFU theses except for those theses submitted within the last 12 months. If you cannot find the thesis you are looking for please search Recently Submitted Theses as it may be a recently submitted thesis and thus not yet available in Summit.

The Scholarly Review Process at the University of Toronto Press

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2004-03-15
Abstract: 

This report discusses the purpose of scholarly review and examines how the components of the process provide scholarly presses with a dependable system by which to select and develop manuscripts for publication. After examining scholarly review in a general sense, this report addresses the review process in detail as it occurs at the University of Toronto Press. The University of Toronto Press is the largest scholarly publisher in Canada and publishes in the social sciences and humanities disciplines. This report identifies safeguards that university presses integrate into the scholarly review process to ensure that the process consistently produces high-quality books. Two rounds of interviews were conducted to collect the data in this report. First, five University of Toronto Press editors were interviewed between July and August of 2002. The second set of interviews included four UTP authors as well as the Programme Manager of the Aid to Scholarly Publications Programme (funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada) and occurred in January of 2003. Information from these conversations was then integrated with what I learned during my internship at the press, as well as with research from the Canadian Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences (CFHSS) Web site, the Journal of Scholarly Publishing, books about publishing with a scholarly press, the Manuscript Review Committee’s terms of reference, and a memorandum from a University of Toronto vice-president about the role of the university’s faculty publication board. This project report concludes by discussing issues that compromise the success of scholarly review and by proposing possible solutions to these problems.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Rowland Lorimer
Department: 
Communication, Art and Technology: Master of Publishing Program
Thesis type: 
Graduating extended essay/Research project. M. Pub.

Modifications to the hospital physical environment : effect on older adults retention of post-discharge instructions

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

This study was conducted in two (originally identical) hospital bedrooms in a community hospital in Burnaby, British Columbia. For the study, one patient room was left in its original state; the second was modified to reduce visual and auditory distraction. In each room, older adults watched a video recording of different post-discharge instructions. After each viewing, and after approximately 24 hours, their learning/retention was tested. While in each room, video equipment and other non-invasive technology recorded physical movements/fidgeting. A significant interaction was found between room type, instruction type and order. Subsequent analyses found that the oldest participants had the most difficulty when faced with learning the more difficult instructions in the "typical" room. Movement/fidget data suggest that participants were less stressed while receiving instruction in the modified room rather than "typical" room. Participants overwhelmingly preferred the modified room and expressed comfort with the use of video to receive post-discharge instruction. NOTE: This thesis constitutes Study 3a of the following report series:(1) Gutman, G.M., Love, T., Parke, B., & Friesen, K. (2006). Towards more elder friendly acute hospitals: Study 1: The physical environment in ACE units: Design specifics and staff ratings Final report. Vancouver, BC: Gerontology Research Centre, Simon Fraser University.(2) Gutman, G.M., Sarte, A., Parke, B., & Friesen, K. (2006). Towards more elder friendly acute hospitals: Study 2: The elder friendliness of the physical environment of medical and surgical units in the Fraser Health Authority: Final report. Vancouver, BC: Gerontology Research Centre, Simon Fraser University.(3) Gutman, G.M., & Love, T. (2008, January). Towards more elder friendly hospitals: Final report - Studies 3b and 3c. [Report submitted to Fraser Health Geriatric Clinical Service Planning and Delivery Team]. Vancouver, BC: Gerontology Research Centre, Simon Fraser University.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Dr. Gloria Gutman
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: Gerontology
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

Die Orphische Weltanschauung der Antike und ihr Erbe bei den Dichtern Nietzsche, Holderlin, Novalis und Rilke

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1990
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Laurence P. Kitching
Department: 
FASS: Humanities
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

Host-range Evolutin in Aphidius Parasitiods: Ecological and Evolutionary Perspectives

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

A fundamental objective in biology is to understand the evolutionary and ecological processes that lead to patterns of diversity. Specialized insect-host relationships have long been suspected of facilitating evolutionary diversification due to the intimate relationship parasites share with their hosts and the potential for disruptive selection when utilizing different host species resulting in genetic divergence. However, the vast majority of research investigating insect-host specialization has focused on herbivores, while the mechanisms of population and species divergence in insects that parasitize and kill other insects (parasitoids) have been largely ignored. Parasitoids have great potential for research in host-specialization and speciation due to their unique biological properties and the immens\; diversity that is ,characteristic of this ecologically important guild. '. The goal of my Ph.D. thesis was to contribute to the greater understanding of host specialization and speciation in parasitoid wasps, with a particular focus on the processes that drive adaptive diversification and the behavioural mechanisms that maintain genetic variation. These topics were addressed through a combination of experimental biology, fieldwork and theoretical modelling using a host-parasite system consisting of a single parasitoid (Aphidius ervi) and two host species (the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum and the foxglove aphid, Aulacorthum solani). Specifically, the physiological mechanism involved in overcoming host defences was investigated to determine if parasitoids adaptively evolve to overcome host defences and ifthis process is under directional selection. Host fidelity, host plant preference, mating preference, and host-instar selection were investigated to determine the importance of these behaviours in mediating gene flow between parasitoid populations utilizing different host species. In combination, these studies further contribute to our basic understanding ofthe mechanisms that lead to and maintain genetic diversity in insect parasitoids.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
B. Roitberg
Department: 
Science: Biological Sciences Department
Thesis type: 
Thesis (Ph.D.)