Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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This collection contains digitized SFU theses except for those theses submitted within the last 12 months. If you cannot find the thesis you are looking for please search Recently Submitted Theses as it may be a recently submitted thesis and thus not yet available in Summit.

Integrated sensing from multiple wearable devices for activity recognition and dead reckoning

Date created: 
2016-03-09
Abstract: 

Wearable devices are increasingly prevalent in our everyday lives. This thesis examines the potential of combining multiple wearable devices worn on different body locations for fitness activity recognition and inertial dead-reckoning. First, a novel method is presented to classify fitness activities using head-worn sensors, with comparisons to other common worn locations on the body. Using multiclass Support Vector Machine (SVM) on head-worn sensors, high degree of accuracy was obtained for classifying standing, walking, running, ascending/descending stairs and cycling. Next, a complete inertial dead-reckoning system for walking and running using smartwatch and smartglasses is proposed. Head-turn motion can derail the position propagation on a head-worn dead-reckoning system. Using the relative angle rate-of-change between arm swing direction and head yaw, head-turn motion can be detected. The experimental results show that using the proposed head-turn detection algorithm, head-worn dead-reckoning performance can be greatly improved.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Edward Park
Department: 
Applied Sciences: School of Mechatronic Systems Engineering
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.Sc.

Here and There and Their and Here

Date created: 
2016-11-17
Abstract: 

My thesis projects point of departure is the immediate neighbourhood where I currently reside. Located at the corner of Hastings Street and Columbia, this region is significant as it straddles the line between two distinct zones of the city; not quite the downtown core and not entirely in the downtown eastside. This liminal space is host to a variety of jarring contrasts that impact both the lives of local residents, and the spaces they inhabit. My final work was designed to mimic the spatial dimensions of my micro-unit apartment, and reflect the various contradictions of modern urban living that surround my location: renewal/decay, wealthy/poor, public space/private space, healthy bodies/unhealthy bodies, formal/informal economies, and conformity/anarchy. In the following document, I discuss the decision-making process that resulted in my thesis exhibition, Here and There and Their and Here, and examine how Walter Benjamin’s theory of allegory, and Henri Lefebvre’s concept of Rhythmanalysis, can be brought into a critical alignment and actualized in contemporary installation art.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Judy Radul
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School for the Contemporary Arts
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.F.A.

Supporting Syrians in Surrey: Policy Options to Increase the Responsiveness of the British Columbian Settlement System to Refugee Needs

Author: 
Date created: 
2017-03-07
Abstract: 

According to the United Nations, between 1990 and 2015 the number of international migrants around the world increased by over 91 million, or 60% (UN 2016). As a result, many countries have welcomed large numbers of refugees, including those from Syria. This study examines the response to the arrival and resettlement of Syrian refugees in Surrey, British Columbia, with a focus on how to improve the community’s ability to meet the needs of future refugees. The study addresses challenges that arose from the rapid arrival of Syrians, as well as ongoing and systemic barriers to optimal service delivery. Six policy options are presented flowing from interview results with settlement sector workers and related stakeholders, and evidence derived from secondary research. The four recommended policy options are designed to lower barriers to settlement service access for refugees, while efficiently increasing the communication flows between frontline settlement staff and policy makers.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Olena Hankivsky
John Richards
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: School of Public Policy
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.P.P.

Perceptual Salience and Its Consequences on Attentional Object Selection

Date created: 
2017-03-31
Abstract: 

This thesis investigated the effects of salience on visual object selection, and focused on whether salience impacts the visual system’s ability to process multiple items at the same time (parallel selection) or one-at-a-time (serial selection). Chapter 2 consists of two experiments that used an ERP component, the N2pc, to track the deployment of attention in a visual search task with highly dissimilar distractors. Although the time to find the target increased with the number of distractors, observers were able to select the target at the same time, regardless of the size of the search display. This suggests that task relevance can make otherwise non-salient items “pop out” at the level of attentional selection. Chapter 3 comprises a single experiment in which attentional selection was measured overtly, using eye tracking, as observers inspected and compared two singletons of differing salience. Discreet eye movements were made from one singleton to the other and the order of inspection was strongly biased by target salience, with the initial saccade being made to the more salient singleton on the vast majority of trials. This suggests that, in the absence of top-down control, the order of attentional selection is dictated by salience. Finally, Chapter 4 consists of three variants of the same two-singleton search task used in Chapter 3. The first experiment replicated Chapter 3 but with attentional selection tracked covertly via the N2pc. In the next two experiments, task parameters were manipulated to encourage slower shifts of attention from one singleton to the other and to encourage the initial inspection of the less salient singleton. Attentional object selection was purely serial in some cases and partially parallel in others. The biasing effect of salience could also be subverted, such that the less salient item was selected first, however that item was not selected as rapidly as the more salient item. Chapter 4 thus reveals that (i) the earliest time at which an item becomes available for attentional selection depends on its relative salience, and (ii) the speed of attentional redeployment varies with the nature of the response required.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
John McDonald
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Psychology
Thesis type: 
(Dissertation) Ph.D.

Computing characteristic polynomials of matrices of structured polynomials

Date created: 
2017-04-13
Abstract: 

We present a parallel modular algorithm for finding characteristic polynomials of matrices with integer coefficient bivariate monomials. For each prime, evaluation and interpolation gives us the bridge between polynomial matrices and matrices over a finite field so that the Hessenberg algorithm can be used. After optimizations, we are able to save a significant amount of work by incremental Chinese remaindering and early termination.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Michael Monagan
Department: 
Science: Department of Mathematics
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.Sc.

On Cauchy's rigorization of complex analysis

Date created: 
2017-04-11
Abstract: 

In this paper, I look at Cauchy’s early (1814–1825) rigorization of complex analysis. I argue that his work should not be understood as a step in improving the deductive methods of mathematics but as a clear, innovative and systematic stance about the semantics of mathematical languages. His approach is contrasted with Laplace’s “no- tational inductions,” influenced by Condillac’s ideas about the language of algebra. Cauchy’s opposition is then not to be seen as stemming from a comeback of geometric and synthetic methods, but as a rejection of the key Condillacian doctrines that algebra is about abstract quantities and that its rules provide means of discovering new mathematical truths. He thereby paved the way for the arithmetization of calculus and fruitfully extended his approach to complex analysis like no one before him. I finish by discussing lessons we can draw about how mathematical rigour differs from rigour in other sciences.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Nicolas Fillion
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Philosophy
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

Human embryo component detection using computer vision

Date created: 
2017-04-24
Abstract: 

This thesis focuses on automatic identification of various components of human embryos in Hoffman Modulation Contrast (HMC) microscopic embryo images at early stages of growth from Day-1 to Day-5. Our primary motivation is to develop an automated system that would assist embryologists to study and analyze the behavior of developing preimplantated embryos in an attempt to improve In-Vitro Fertilization (IVF) outcomes. Through this thesis, we propose three novel methods for identification of various parts of human embryo. The main contribution of this thesis is to efficiently and reliably determine the boundaries of embryonic cells in Day-1 to Day-3 of HMC human embryo images. The proposed method is a model-based one that utilizes global ellipsoidal models conforming to the local image features such as edges and normals. It is an iterative approach through which image features contribute only to one candidate and will be retired once associated with that model candidate. An overall Precision and Sensitivity of 92% and 88% are achieved. Another contribution of this thesis is to segment different components of Day-5 embryos (also known as blastocysts) in HMC images as size and properties of these regions play an important role in grading and selecting viable embryos. A new method, called Segmentation using Neural Network in Compressed Domain (SNNCD), is developed to segment all three regions (Zona Pellucida (ZP), Trophectoderm (TE) and Inner Cell Mass (ICM)) in compressed blastocyst images. We exploit valuable features of a DCT transform to train a 2-layer feedforward backpropagation neural network. The overall Precision of 0.80, 0.69 and 0.76 and Sensitivity of 0.81, 0.80 and 0.56 for the ZP, TE and ICM detection in test data are achieved, respectively. Last, we propose a two-stage pipeline, called Segmentation using Fully Convolutional Network (SFCN) that first uses a preprocessing step to remove artifacts from the input images, which are then used by the Fully Convolutional Networks (FCN) to identify ICM regions. We also propose a data augmentation technique to avoid overfitting. The performance of the proposed pipeline is evaluated based on Accuracy and Overall Quality (OQ). This method improves SNNCD results on ICM segmentation by about 28% on OQ.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Parvaneh Saeedi
Ivan Bajic
Department: 
Applied Sciences: School of Engineering Science
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.Sc.

A Gaze-based Attention System for Multi-human Multi-robot Interaction

Author: 
Date created: 
2017-04-03
Abstract: 

This thesis presents a computer vision based attention system for interaction between multiple humans and multiple robots. The study contains three parts. In the first part each human can “select” (obtain the undivided attention of) a ground robot and interact with it by simply gazing (looking directly) at it. This extends previous work whereby a single human can select one or more robots from a population. In the second part, a feature which allows robots to be selected by people they cannot see is introduced. This is the first demonstration of many-to-many robot-selection HRI. Humans are detected, tracked, and allocated to robots partners in a two-step linear assignment problem. In the third part, we demonstrate the attention system with flying robots. The “micro-feedback” method which allows users to pre-select, select and de-select robots is introduced. This is the first demonstration of multiple UAV interacting with multiple human using face engagement.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Richard Vaughan
Department: 
Applied Sciences: School of Computing Science
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.Sc.

Similar image retrieval for dermoscopy images using interest point detection

Author: 
Date created: 
2017-03-28
Abstract: 

Providing physicians with a set of pathology-confirmed similar images to a new difficult case can efficiently assist towards a more confident diagnosis; this concept is called Content-Based Image Retrieval. We used SURF interest point detection to find and match similar dermoscopy images from a labeled dermoscopic image database. SURF automatically finds points of interest with the shape of blobs, dots. Haar - wavelet responses and local color histograms are locally extracted from each detected key point. The similarity of two images is decided by matching their key points and finding the Euclidean distance between them. We evaluated our system’s performance based on its ability for retrieving images with the same texture features and similar diagnosis. For query images containing a pigment network the precision with retrieval of 9 images, P(9), is 75%; for dots and globules, the precision P(9) is 80%. The precision P(9) for Melanoma diagnosis is 72%, which is acceptable forsuch systems.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Stella Atkins
Mark Drew
Department: 
Applied Sciences: School of Computing Science
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.Sc.

Sources of Irrational Behaviour. Three Essays on Theory and Experimental Evidence

Author: 
Date created: 
2017-04-05
Abstract: 

This thesis investigates aspects of human behaviour that can be considered irrational from an economic point of view. Potential reasons for three persistent behavioural patterns in economic interactions are investigated: Altruism, discrimination, and punishment of deviant (“immoral”) behaviour. For the first two patterns, this thesis reports the results of dictator game experiments with young children in primary schoolsin Vancouver, BC, Canada. To understand altruism, the thesis looks for potential reasons why children share resources with genetically unrelated others. It shows that socialization in a particular cultural environment, indicated by the language children speak at home, influences children’s sharing behaviour to a large extent. The second part investigates discrimination among children belonging to different ethnic groups. It shows that while children from the dominant white category show clear signs of in-goup bias in their sharing decisions, children from the East Asian minority behave based on a more complex ethnic identity. The third part presents a simple game theoretic model to outline a potential evolutionary origin for a genetic disposition to punish behaviour that conflicts with prevailing moral norms. The model shows how human evolution in small groups can make moral punishment evolutionarily advantageous for individual agents.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Jasmina Arifovic
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Economics
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) Ph.D.