Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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This collection contains digitized SFU theses except for those theses submitted within the last 12 months. If you cannot find the thesis you are looking for please search Recently Submitted Theses as it may be a recently submitted thesis and thus not yet available in Summit.

Into the Web : how a small publisher in India found a place on the Internet

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1999-03
Abstract: 

Within the realm of publishing, digital communication in the form of the Internet is offering revolutionary opportunities. There are Web sites for an immeasurable range of subject matter from the daily news to online shopping to Brad the mechanical engineering grad's curriculum vitae. So who better to venture into this new form of publication than, well, publishers? The subject matter of this study analyses the entry of a small book publisher in India into the new area of Internet publishing. Kali for Women is a feminist press in New Delhi and also happens to be the first women's publishing house in South Asia. The author of this report travelled to New Delhi to establish a Web site for the company. Although the editors at Kali for Women had wanted to start a Web site for some time, the decision to create Kali's own place on the Internet meant the adoption of an entirely new publishing format with technology unfamiliar to those in the company.

 

While the initiative was successful, it was fraught with challenges and obstacles, a condition that accompanies the introduction of anything new. This study attempts to map Kali's technological trajectory, but first places the endeavour in the context oflndian publishing and Kali's formation and presence in that market. The goal is to understand how and why a small, "low-tech" publisher in New Delhi established a presence in the online global community. The research is based on readings in related subject matter, newspaper articles from Kali's archives, writings by Kali's founders, a sampling of other publishers' Web sites, and the author's own experience .

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Rowland Lorimer
Department: 
Master of Publishing Program - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project Report (M.Pub.)

Interactions among Dam, SeqA and mismatch repair proteins in Escherichia coli

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2019-03-31
Abstract: 

The accuracy of DNA replication is very important, and organisms have several proofreading and repair systems to prevent mutations from occurring. Lesions can be introduced by errors during replication, chemical mutagens, UV or ionizing radiation. In Escherichia coli, mismatches are detected by MutS and MutL which together activate MutH to initiate repair. Repair is dependent on GATC hemi-methylation signals on the DNA which is added by DNA adenosine methylase (Dam). SeqA acts as a regulator of DNA replication, sequestering the origin and preventing reinitiation. We hypothesize that 1) Dam and SeqA are coordinated by MutL, and (2) persistent mismatches caused by lack of polymerase proofreading will increase mismatch repair activity. Results show that Dam binds to both SeqA and MutL, and no significant increase in mismatch repair activity was detected when the error prone polymerase was induced. These data suggest the importance of temporal coordination of methylation and/or interaction of Dam and MutL in preparation for mismatch repair. Our data is consistent with previous literature that shows mismatch repair primarily works against transitions and is inefficient at preventing transversions.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Claire Cupples
Department: 
Science: Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.Sc.

Role-Focused Process-Mapping for Documenting Software Systems Usage at Hemlock Printers

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2019-04-02
Abstract: 

This report introduces readers to the principles of process mapping, a flowchart technique widely used in manufacturing and engineering for diagnosis, analysis and improvement of processes and whose advantages can be applied to tasks carried out in Publishing. We base this exposition on the experience gained during the process mapping of Hemlock Printers Ltd. a Burnaby-based company with 50 years in the industry, which started a project to document its workflows and the way software applications were used to automatize them. We examine the nature of process maps, how the company was conceptualized for study and the ways to collect information used, followed by a step by step guide to draw these diagrams, ending with a detailed analysis of selected examples of workflows at Hemlock using these maps and how to apply them to identify problems and opportunities for improvement.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Juan Pablo Alperin
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: Publishing Program
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.Pub.

Professionals in Post-Secondary Education: Conceptions of Career Influence

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2019-04-03
Abstract: 

Undergraduate students increasingly cite vocational preparation and enhancement as their main reasons for pursuing a post-secondary education. Yet, when they require career advice and support, instead of visiting the career centres on their campuses, students turn to the career influencers in their existing networks: individuals who informally provide career-related advice, guidance, and/or counselling. This qualitative study explores the conceptions of post-secondary education (PSE) professionals working outside of career centres and asks, “How do post-secondary education (PSE) professionals conceive their influence in student career development?” First, 104 students completed a poll identifying the types of PSE professionals they turn to for career help. Then, PSE professionals serving in these identified roles were recruited for the study. Fifteen professionals participated in an in-depth interview discussing a) their professional background, b) their conceptions of the term career, c) how they saw themselves contributing to student career development, and d) resources and competencies that would further their impact to student career success. The study reveals that professionals’ conceptions of career, informed by their experiences and beliefs, influence the career advice they provide to students. Professionals also believe they contribute to student career development through performing their professional roles and exhibiting personal attributes that promote meaningful student interactions and relationships. To enhance their career influence they desire professional development on career-related topics and would like to see institutional commitment in recognizing student career success as an institutional priority. The findings yield recommendations for further research on career influencers in other institutional contexts. Implications are identified for practice that would enhance career services delivery, and employee and student career success.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Kris Magnusson
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) Ed.D.

Navigating Coexistence: Ecological Drivers and Social Implications of Predator-induced Regime Shifts in the Northeast Pacific

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2019-06-05
Abstract: 

Societies are greatly challenged by regime shifts, when ecosystems undergo fundamental changes that are rapid, unexpected, and difficult to reverse. In order to better navigate these transitions, we need information on the drivers, species interactions, and feedbacks that influence ecosystem dynamics, and an understanding of how human communities are adapting to the profound shifts in ecosystem resources. My thesis applies this social-ecological system lens to an iconic regime shift – the recovery of sea otters (Enhydra lutris) in the Northeast Pacific that is triggering a trophic cascade which causes sea urchin and shellfish-dominated rocky reefs to become productive macroalgae-dominated forests. To examine how predation and herbivory interactions affect the structure, function, and resilience of reef communities on the central coast of British Columbia (BC), I conducted four years of subtidal surveys and experiments. These data confirm the critical role of sea otter predation in suppressing urchin populations, but also demonstrate for the first time, that complementary predation by mesopredators (i.e. sunflower sea star Pycnopodia helianthoides) further enhance the resilience of kelp forests by consuming smaller-sized urchins that are otherwise unconsumed by otters. I also experimentally quantified how numerical and behavioural factors collectively influence herbivory rates that maintain alternative reef states. Kelp consumption rates showed a positive but non-linear relationship with urchin biomass, whereas food subsidies and predator-avoidance behaviour reduced urchin grazing rates. Next, to understand how sea otter recovery influences coastal Indigenous communities, I worked in a collaborative Indigenous partnership to host workshops and conduct survey interviews in a comparative case study. We identified 22 social-ecological conditions that can influence Indigenous peoples’ ability to adapt to otters, and revealed how perceptions and adaptive capacity differed between a BC First Nations community and an Alaska Sugpiaq Tribe. These quantitative and qualitative data suggest that coexistence with sea otters could be improved through strengthening Indigenous agency and authority and enabling collaborative adaptive otter management grounded in traditional knowledge and western science. As a whole, this thesis highlights the complexities, surprises, and contextual nuances that characterize sea otter recovery in tightly coupled social-ecological systems, and provides the foundations for a road map to improve future human-otter coexistence.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Anne K. Salomon
Department: 
Environment: School of Resource and Environmental Management
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) Ph.D.

The present status of the curation crisis and deaccessioning in the United States

Author: 
Date created: 
2019-01-21
Abstract: 

Archaeological collections in the United States were deemed to be in crisis in the 1970s. Federal curation guidelines were issued in 1990 with 36 CFR Part 79, followed by a call for national standards by the Society for American Archaeology. It is not clear if these were successful because the current status of collections is generally unknown. Given this, I surveyed curation practices at 11 major US archaeological repositories, impediments to their implementation of modern curation standards, and their deaccessioning policies. Although many of the individual standards were being met, around one-third of the collections do not meet all the standards. Methods used to meet standards varied across institutions, and the major contributor to collections was heritage resource management. Funding and space were the most often reported impediments. Every institution reported deaccessioning, but not all had policies. Ultimately, collections have improved since the 1970s, but further progress is needed.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Mark Collard
Department: 
Environment: Department of Archaeology
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

Creating space for authentic voice in Canada's screen industry: A case study of 'Women In the Director's Chair (WIDC)'

Author: 
Date created: 
2019-01-25
Abstract: 

Using an appreciative inquiry approach and sharing a reflexive 4-D (i.e., discovery, dreams, design, delivery / destiny) narrative that explores societal, organizational and personal perspectives, this action research study describes a specially designed, internationally respected Canadian national professional development initiative for women screen directors, entitled ‘Women In the Director’s Chair (WIDC)’. The narrative traces how this initiative came to be, and within the context of North America’s ‘waves’ of feminism, where it is placed on the landscape of Canada’s screen industry. While foregrounding a well-documented socio-cultural ‘lack of confidence’ in women leaders and in particular in women screen directors in Canada, the study contextualizes the personal ‘leadership experience’ narratives of WIDC director participants while the author makes meaning of her own leadership journey as a co-creator of the WIDC initiative. The author further explores the twenty-two-year evolution of WIDC’s transformation-oriented pedagogical design as she reflects on the positive core of WIDC and asks, ‘What is WIDC? What was learned and what’s next?’ Sharing leadership metaphors that offer guidance for navigating a ‘continuum of confidence’ and offering a theoretical map towards transformation for individual women as well as feminist or like-minded organizations, the study concludes with a call to action to adopt an appreciative growth-minded stance in order to create space for authentic voices to thrive in Canada’s screen industry, in particular the voices of female leaders.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Carolyn Mamchur
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) Ed.D.

How to slash GHG emissions in the freight sector? Policy insights from a technology adoption model of Canada

Author: 
Date created: 
2019-01-09
Abstract: 

The movement of goods through freight transportation accounts for approximately 6% of total Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions worldwide and 10% of Canada’s emissions, yet the freight sector is rarely targeted by GHG abatement research and policy. To address this gap, I use a technology adoption model (CIMS-Freight) to explore the effectiveness of policies in achieving GHG reductions in land freight (trucking and rail), and to determine scenarios that achieve Canada’s ambitious GHG reduction targets (i.e. 80% by 2050 relative to 2005 levels). To account for uncertainty in model parameters, I incorporate a Monte Carlo Analysis in which I run 1000 iterations of each simulation. My modeling results indicate that current policies (i.e. fuel efficiency standards as well as the federally proposed carbon price and low-carbon fuel standard) will not achieve 2030 and 2050 GHG reduction targets – where freight emissions will continue to rise, albeit at a lower rate than a “no policy” scenario. I also simulate the effectiveness of several individual policies: fuel efficiency standards, a carbon tax, low-carbon fuel standard (LCFS), a zero-emissions vehicle (ZEV) mandate for truck and purchase subsidy. Even at their most stringent levels, no individual policy has a high probability (at least 67% of Monte Carlo iterations) of achieving 2030 or 2050 GHG reduction targets. Finally, I find that several policy combinations can have a high probability of achieving 2050 goals, in particular a stringent ZEV mandate for trucks complemented by a stringent LCFS. While other effective policies and policy combinations are possible, it is clear that Canada’s present and proposed policies are not nearly stringent enough to reach its ambitious emissions reductions targets.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Jonn Axsen
Department: 
Environment: School of Resource and Environmental Management
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.R.M.

Designing eBooks to facilitate mathematical dialogue during shared reading

Author: 
Date created: 
2019-01-15
Abstract: 

This research aimed to investigate the impact of variation in eBook design, specifically hotspots, on caregiver-preschooler dyads’ communications about mathematics story content during shared reading. Two eBooks were designed and compared. Hotspots in the math eBook guided joint attention to mathematically-related activated features; hotspots in the emotion-action eBook guided joint attention to emotions and actions of the characters. The hotspots were matched in number and type across both eBooks. The narrative and illustrations remained consistent between the two eBooks. The dyads’ interaction with different types of hotspots; and their use of spoken utterances and gestures were compared across the two conditions. Thirty-two dyads participated in this study; 16 in each group. Findings showed that, in both groups, all caregivers and children used spoken utterances and gestures, albeit to different extent, to express the mathematics content in the narrative. However, spoken utterances and gestures that aligned with mathematics occurred more frequently among dyads in the math condition compared to the other condition. Further, caregivers in the math condition responded to hotspots by asking high-level cognitive questions, and both caregivers and children in this condition reacted mostly by repeating what was heard. In the emotion-action condition, dyads reacted emotively to the hotspots. Findings also showed that dyads in the math condition – as opposed to their peers - tended to discuss the embedded mathematics activities. Thematic analysis was done to explore in more depth the interplay between the acting on the hotspot and the narrative concerning the communication about mathematics as the dyads discussed two activities embedded in the story. Three themes emerged regarding scaffolding of mathematical ideas, co-construction of ideas, as well as seeking self-discovery and agency of the child. Findings from the Caregiver Satisfaction Questionnaire showed differences across conditions in regards to the children’s attention; and similarities in perceptions of the children’s enjoyment and willingness to share eBooks in the future. Findings from this research raise implications for the future designs of eBooks; particularly regarding the content and placement of the hotspots.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Phil Winne
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) Ph.D.

Developing a vector light sensor

Author: 
Date created: 
2019-01-10
Abstract: 

Over the past few decades, numerous sensors have been invented for the measurement of light intensity. In most cases, a setup external to the sensor is required to detect the direction of an incoming beam of light. In this work, the design, fabrication, and characterization of a novel light sensor is described. The three-dimensional structure of the sensor allows it to detect both the intensity as well as the direction of the incident light beam, hence becoming a vector light sensor (VLS). The sensor structure is based on creating photodiodes on sidewalls of miniaturized raised or inverted pyramids etched in silicon. Each photodiode was formed by selective doping of the material on each facet of the pyramid, forming a photodiode with the P-type substrate. A set of signal processing algorithms was developed to estimate the direction and the distance of a light source from the sensors. The light sensing devices with both raised and inverted pyramid structures were then fabricated in a cleanroom based on silicon microfabrication technologies. Throughout the process, the lithography step for the textured surface needed to be optimized. An interface circuit was designed and used to amplify and process the signals from the devices. The device operation was verified experimentally to estimate the direction of a light beam. The small size and low power consumption of the individual sensors make them suitable for applications were simple distance and direction estimation is required. The sensors can be arrayed to provide light-field information in the plane of sensor.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Behraad Bahreyni
Department: 
Applied Sciences: School of Mechatronic Systems Engineering
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.Sc.