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Information Literacy Skills: an exploratory focus group study of student perceptions

Author: 
Date created: 
1997
Abstract: 

This article reports the results of an exploratory study using focus group
methodology in information literacy research. A small focus group-seven
undergraduate students at Conwrdia University College of Albertudiscussed
the concept of information literacy and the role of the undergraduate
library in developing information literacy skills. Participants perceived
information literacy us valuable, and agreed that the libra y plays an
important role in developing the skill of locating information. Moreover,
the focus group method demonstrated potential for generating us&l data
in this field, particularly hypotheses for further research.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Why scholarship should never be a commodity!

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-05-19
Abstract: 

Presentation on the implications of treating scholarly work as a commodity and options for liberating our work to scholar-led and/or open access journals, focusing on the discipline of communication.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Institutional Open Access Funds and Hybrid OA Support: Two Case Studies

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-01-10
Abstract: 

This presentation reviews the experience of two library-based open access funds, with particular focus on the issue of subsidizing OA fees charged by hybrid journal publishers.

Document type: 
Conference presentation
File(s): 

The Challenge of Scholarly Communication in the 21st Century

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-03-12
Abstract: 

At the dawn of the 21st century we are witnessing a dramatic growth in the production of knowledge, posing immense challenges for its dissemination, management and long-term preservation. Recent studies out of Australia, Denmark, Netherlands, UK, and US attempt to quantify the costs and benefits of each component of the scholarly communication lifecycle. These and related studies provide the basis for developing sustainable models to meet the challenge.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Libr 582: Digital images and text collections: Integrated digital collections

Author: 
Date created: 
2011-03-15
Abstract: 

Presentation to SLAIS Libr 585 March 15 2011

Document type: 
Conference presentation

The role of the research library in an emerging global public sphere

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2010-07-18
Abstract: 

Presents a vision of a potential future global public sphere, why it is needed and signs of emergence, and the role of the research library in this global public sphere, as provider of a distributed knowledge commons, preserver of scholarly information, and source of specialized expertise. Key short-term transitional steps are covered, particularly transition to a fully open access scholarly publishing system.

Document type: 
Conference presentation
File(s): 

Freedom for scholarship in the internet age

Author: 
Date created: 
2010-02-25
Abstract: 

Begins with some thoughts on the purpose of scholarship. This question should frame any discussion of scholarly communication. While there are millions of researchers and at least as many research questions, it can be useful to think about a question like addressing global warming when evaluating potential change in scholarly communication. Note that it is important to remember that there can be a signficant gap in time (sometimes centuries) between when a concept is introduced, and when it is understood.

From the scholar's perspective, publisher-added digital rights management (DRM) is seen as a hindrance to scholarship - not a value add. Libre open access - free to re-use as well as to read - is only a small fraction of open access right now, but it is predicted that libre OA will be increasingly sought by scholars who experience its benefits.

Dealing with the sheer volume of information presently available (and still expanding exponentially) is one of the key challenges for scholars, librarians, and publishers alike. Three strategies for addressing this challenge are discussed. Reading less or filtering is seen as tempting, but not a good idea when examined against the purpose of scholarship. For example, if we find the volume of information coming from China overwhelming, it might be tempted to skip reading it; but if Chinese scholars are doing research that could help us to figure out a clean energy breakthrough, this isn't such a good idea. Writing less is a strategy that has more potential. Some of the pressure to write in quantity in academia may actually be counterproductive. Collaborating is a strategy well worth pursuing. To understand why, first picture the physics article with a thousand authors. Then picture another discipline, where a thousand authors each write one article.

Current tenure and promotion procedures do not reward collaboration. While there is much to be said for tradition in academia, there are times when tradition needs to be reexamined for the benefit of scholarship; and this is one of these times. Changing tenure and promotion procedures is not easy, nor is it the mandate of librarians; but I would argue that the good work librarians have done in the area of scholarly communication have opened a window for scholars to begin these broader discussions.

The window of opportunity is briefly discussed, from the identification of the serials crisis to the campaign to create change, to the exciting changes we see all around us - over 4,700 journals in DOAJ, more than 1,500 repositories in OpenDOAR, over 150 open access mandate policies, more than 22 million free publications through BASE.

What is really amazing about all this change is that it has taken place with virtually no resources. Evidence that there is more than sufficient funds, from academic library subscription budgets alone, to not only fund a fully open access scholarly publishing system, but save lots of money at the same time, is presented (a John Houghton slide on cost implications for a switch to OA for the UK Higher Education, and two of my slides on a global shift to OA by academic libraries).

The reasons why savings and not just status quo costs are needed are mentioned briefly, e.g. the need to move into support for open data and e-science, and address preservation of electronic information.

Next steps for libraries are presented, including keeping up the good work in building and filling repositories, hosting open access journals, and education on scholarly communication and open access. Consider setting up an open access author's fund, or transforming licensing language to reflect a shift in purchase (from subscription to subscription / full OA for our authors), and other means of economic support for open access.

Many thanks to OCULA and especially to OCULA President Nathalie Soini for the invitation to speak at OLA. I hope to find time to elaborate on some of the topics from this speech in more depth at a later date.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Free and open scholarship in the internet age

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2010-05-06
Abstract: 

Describes an action research project on scholarly communication in early stages. Research sites include the Open Access Journal Supports in Canada research team, E-LIS, the Open Archive for Library and Information, Scholarly and Research Communication (a new open access journal), and Stream, the SFU School of Communication graduate student open access journal. Methods include action research, economic and discourse analysis.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Open Access Journals Support in Canada

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2010-06-22
Abstract: 

Describes preliminary results of the pan-Canadian Open Access Journals Support in Canada survey of university libraries and presses conducted in spring 2010. The majority of respondents are involved in scholarly journal publishing, with more planning to get involved. There is strong trend towards preferential support for open access publishing. Responses to questions about support for a variety of open access models indicated that any model for OA transition would received some level of support from a majority of libraries.

Document type: 
Conference presentation