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Libr 582: Digital images and text collections: Integrated digital collections

Author: 
Date created: 
2011-03-15
Abstract: 

Presentation to SLAIS Libr 585 March 15 2011

Document type: 
Conference presentation

The role of the research library in an emerging global public sphere

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2010-07-18
Abstract: 

Presents a vision of a potential future global public sphere, why it is needed and signs of emergence, and the role of the research library in this global public sphere, as provider of a distributed knowledge commons, preserver of scholarly information, and source of specialized expertise. Key short-term transitional steps are covered, particularly transition to a fully open access scholarly publishing system.

Document type: 
Conference presentation
File(s): 

Freedom for scholarship in the internet age

Author: 
Date created: 
2010-02-25
Abstract: 

Begins with some thoughts on the purpose of scholarship. This question should frame any discussion of scholarly communication. While there are millions of researchers and at least as many research questions, it can be useful to think about a question like addressing global warming when evaluating potential change in scholarly communication. Note that it is important to remember that there can be a signficant gap in time (sometimes centuries) between when a concept is introduced, and when it is understood.

From the scholar's perspective, publisher-added digital rights management (DRM) is seen as a hindrance to scholarship - not a value add. Libre open access - free to re-use as well as to read - is only a small fraction of open access right now, but it is predicted that libre OA will be increasingly sought by scholars who experience its benefits.

Dealing with the sheer volume of information presently available (and still expanding exponentially) is one of the key challenges for scholars, librarians, and publishers alike. Three strategies for addressing this challenge are discussed. Reading less or filtering is seen as tempting, but not a good idea when examined against the purpose of scholarship. For example, if we find the volume of information coming from China overwhelming, it might be tempted to skip reading it; but if Chinese scholars are doing research that could help us to figure out a clean energy breakthrough, this isn't such a good idea. Writing less is a strategy that has more potential. Some of the pressure to write in quantity in academia may actually be counterproductive. Collaborating is a strategy well worth pursuing. To understand why, first picture the physics article with a thousand authors. Then picture another discipline, where a thousand authors each write one article.

Current tenure and promotion procedures do not reward collaboration. While there is much to be said for tradition in academia, there are times when tradition needs to be reexamined for the benefit of scholarship; and this is one of these times. Changing tenure and promotion procedures is not easy, nor is it the mandate of librarians; but I would argue that the good work librarians have done in the area of scholarly communication have opened a window for scholars to begin these broader discussions.

The window of opportunity is briefly discussed, from the identification of the serials crisis to the campaign to create change, to the exciting changes we see all around us - over 4,700 journals in DOAJ, more than 1,500 repositories in OpenDOAR, over 150 open access mandate policies, more than 22 million free publications through BASE.

What is really amazing about all this change is that it has taken place with virtually no resources. Evidence that there is more than sufficient funds, from academic library subscription budgets alone, to not only fund a fully open access scholarly publishing system, but save lots of money at the same time, is presented (a John Houghton slide on cost implications for a switch to OA for the UK Higher Education, and two of my slides on a global shift to OA by academic libraries).

The reasons why savings and not just status quo costs are needed are mentioned briefly, e.g. the need to move into support for open data and e-science, and address preservation of electronic information.

Next steps for libraries are presented, including keeping up the good work in building and filling repositories, hosting open access journals, and education on scholarly communication and open access. Consider setting up an open access author's fund, or transforming licensing language to reflect a shift in purchase (from subscription to subscription / full OA for our authors), and other means of economic support for open access.

Many thanks to OCULA and especially to OCULA President Nathalie Soini for the invitation to speak at OLA. I hope to find time to elaborate on some of the topics from this speech in more depth at a later date.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Free and open scholarship in the internet age

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2010-05-06
Abstract: 

Describes an action research project on scholarly communication in early stages. Research sites include the Open Access Journal Supports in Canada research team, E-LIS, the Open Archive for Library and Information, Scholarly and Research Communication (a new open access journal), and Stream, the SFU School of Communication graduate student open access journal. Methods include action research, economic and discourse analysis.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2005-01
Abstract: 

A review of the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. 

Document type: 
Article

Open Access Journals Support in Canada

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2010-06-22
Abstract: 

Describes preliminary results of the pan-Canadian Open Access Journals Support in Canada survey of university libraries and presses conducted in spring 2010. The majority of respondents are involved in scholarly journal publishing, with more planning to get involved. There is strong trend towards preferential support for open access publishing. Responses to questions about support for a variety of open access models indicated that any model for OA transition would received some level of support from a majority of libraries.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Open Content Alliance (OCA) vs. Google Books: OCA as superior network and better fit for an emerging global public sphere

Author: 
Date created: 
2010-01-11
Abstract: 

The Open Content Alliance (OCA) is a network of libraries
and similar organizations committed to digitizing and providing
broadest possible access to books and other materials; over 1.6
million books are already online under OCA principles. OCA is
analyzed in contrast with Google Books (as per the preliminary Google
Books Settlement, November 2009), using Castell’s network theory and
theories of an emerging global public sphere, based on the work of
Habermas and Fraser. OCA is seen as a superior network to Google
Books, with particular strengths in connectedness, consistency (shared
goals), flexibility, scalability, survivability, networking
(inclusion / exclusion) power, and network-making power, including the
ability to form strategic alliances. The lawsuit against Google
Books, and the settlement, illustrate some of the limitations of
Google Books as a network, for example the lawsuit per se is a
challenge to Google Books’ rights to make decisions on inclusion and
exclusion, and illustrates poor connectedness and consistency, two
attributes Castells points to as essential to the performance of a
network. The respectful, law-abiding approach of OCA is a good fit
for a global public sphere, while the Google Books Settlement takes a
key issue that has traditionally been decided by governments (orphan
books), and brings the decision-making power into private contract
negotiations, diminishing democracy. The current Google Books
Settlement is fractured on a national (geographic) basis; consequences
could include decreased understanding of the rest of the world by a
leading nation, the U.S. This works against the development of a
global public sphere, and has potential negative economic and security
implications for the U.S.. OCA is presented as one node of an
emerging library network for the global public sphere, a global public
good increasing access to knowledge everywhere, increasing the
potential for informed public debate towards global consensus.

Document type: 
Preprint
File(s): 

SCOAP3: a key library leadership opportunity in the transition to open access

Author: 
Date created: 
2009
Abstract: 

The SCOAP3 consortium aims to transition the whole of High Energy
Physics (HEP) publishing from a subscription to an open access basis.
SCOAP3 currently has commitments for more than 63% of the projected
10 million Euros per year budget, from partners in more than 21
countries,
including more than 50 libraries and consortia in the U.S. Full
participation from the U.S., a leader in HEP research, is both
essential and particularly challenging, as the U.S. does not have a
national coordinating body that can make one commitment for the
country, as many other countries do. While the work to undertake this
commitment for the library should not be underestimated - figuring
out subscription costs when journals are part of a big deal, often
through a consortium - neither should the benefits be underestimated.
In brief, the benefits are the optimum access that comes with open
access - full open access to the publisher's PDF for everyone,
everywhere; a model for transitioning to open access that involves no
financial risk, as commitments are capped at current subscriptions
expenditures, and SCOAP3 is addressing the issue of unbundling
successful journals from big deals and reducing costs accordingly;
future financial benefits as a transparent, production-based pricing
model for scholarly communication introduces competition into a
market where it has been lacking; gaining publisher acceptance of
library advocacy efforts for open access by addressing a key concern
of publishers (financing the journals in an open access environment)
and perhaps most importantly, establishing a leadership role for
libraries in a future for scholarly communication that will be
largely open access.

As Douglas (2009) explains, "To move forward in achieving open
access, U.S. libraries that subscribe to any of the five journals
that are considered 100 percent convertible to SCOAP3 (European
Physical Journal C, Journal of High Energy Physics, Nuclear Physics
B, Physical
Review D, and Physics Letters B) need to participate". If this
describes your library, please go to the SCOAP3 website, now, to
learn more and participate in this innovative global collaboration
that can be a model, not only for transitioning to open access, but
also for how humankind can
work cooperatively across borders to accomplish a great good that
will benefit all of us.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Open Access: Key Trends

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2009-09-22
Document type: 
Conference presentation
File(s):