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Do We All Need to Keep That? Shared Print Archving in COPPUL

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2013-05-10
Abstract: 

This conference presetation presents a profile of the Shared Print Archive Network from the Council of Prairie and Pacific University Libraries (COPPUL) as of May 2013.

Document type: 
Conference presentation
File(s): 

Science and Scholarly Communication : BCLA Browser

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2009-09-30
Abstract: 

Review of scholarly communication issues in the world of scientific publishing in addition to a review of migrating the British Columbia Library Association's print newsletter, The BCLA Reporter, to an online environment using Open Journal Systems and renaming the newsletter, BCLA Browser.

Document type: 
Lecture / Talk

CUFTS ERM: reSearcher: Open Source Software for Libraries

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012-06-23
Abstract: 

A description of CUFTS ERM, a module of the reSearcher suite of open source software developed by the SFU Library. 

Document type: 
Conference presentation
File(s): 

Managing Electronic Resources with Open Source Software

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012-02-21
Abstract: 

The Simon Fraser University Library has been a leader in developing open source solutions for libraries for more than a decade.  This session will provide an overview of the complex world of library systems (Link Resolvers, Knowledgebases, Integrated Library Systems, Electronic Resource Management Systems, Discovery Services, Off-campus authentication systems) used by the modern academic library to efficiently manage electronic resources.  The session will present perspectives from two libraries using a mix of open source and commercial options.

Some topics that will be addressed include interoperability issues between systems, especially the exchange of information between proprietary and open-source software, customer support when relying on an open source community, barriers to adopting open source software, and key advantages of using open source software in libraries.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Sto:lo Library: Transitioning from the past to the present

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2013-05-04
Abstract: 

Stó:lō culture is not an aspect of the past, but a vibrant and rich part of today. The Stó:lō Library takes participation in this by hosting a biannual Ethnohistory Fieldschool, overseeing the collaboration of unique reports between students working and community members. The library also contributes to the Reciprocal Research Network, allowing researches worldwide a glimpse into the rich material culture of S'ólh Téméxw.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Dramatic Growth of Open Access March 31, 2013

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2013-03-31
Abstract: 

Highlights

This issue features a comparison of open access growth including CC-BY article growth figures supplied by OASPA. In brief: for every CC-BY article addition tracked by OASPA, repositories around the world add 359 documents as found by a BASE search, DOAJ adds 10 articles that are not CC-BY licensed (90% of DOAJ article growth), arXiv and SSRN each add 3 documents, and the Internet Archive adds lots of texts, movies, sound recordings and concerts. Recent research suggests that CC-BY is the preference of a small minority of scholars.

The top 10 growth figures by percentage for both this quarter and the past year are presented. Looking at percentage growth brings out substantial growth in initiatives with smaller numbers. Note that smaller numbers are not necessarily less significant. One open access funding agency mandate can mean free access to tens or even hundreds of thousands of articles, for example. Open access mandates are high on the list of percentage growth figures, including 26 funding agency OA mandates this quarter for a total of 80 and a growth rate of 48%. The Directory of Open Access Books is growing up leaps and bounds, or to be more specific added 13 publishers and 135 books this quarter. The usual suspects (Directory of Open Access Journals, PubMedCentral, and BASE) continue to rank highly on percentage comparisons. Highwire Press added a total of 20 totally free sites this past year for a total of 71, an impressive sixth place (not bad for an initiative that isn't focused on open access).

 

Kudos to DOAJ for hitting the 1 million article milestone. Bjork, Laakso, Welling and Paetau have issued a preprint of another major open access growth study, the Anatomy of Green Open Access, finding that the coverage of all journals articles as green open access is currently at 12%. Suber has posted additional figures and analysis and updated the open access by the numbers section of the Open Access Directory. New this issue is the amazing 281 billion web pages of the Internet Archive.

Document type: 
Dataset

A Framework for International Nodes in Private LOCKSS Networks

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2013-01-14
Abstract: 

Position paper describing a model framework for organizations to use when including "international nodes" in their Private LOCKSS Networks.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Necessary efficiencies: the economics of transition to open access

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012-11-07
Abstract: 

The collective budgets of the world’s academic libraries are the primary economic support for scholarly journal publishing today, accounting for 80-90% of publisher revenue. This poster argues that shifting this support from subscriptions to open access publishing will be critical to a successful transition to a fully open access scholarly journal publishing system. Drawing on economic analysis conducted as part of my dissertation, this poster also argues that scholarly publishing can be not only fully open access, but also considerably more affordable, with prudent attention to necessary efficiencies in the transition process. The range of possibilities for a fully open access publishing system include options that could cost less – possibly considerably less - than half of current spend. A key metric to assessing efficiency will be the average cost per article; when this amount is multiplied by the over one million scholarly articles produced around the world on an annual basis, it is easy to see what a difference it makes whether the average is the PLoS ONE article processing fee of id="mce_marker",350 US, the average cost per article of scholar-led publishers as found by Edgar & Willinsky of id="mce_marker"88, PeerJ’s lifetime publishing starting at $99 – or the $3,000 to $5,000 per article charged by a few publishers today. It is argued that efficiencies are necessary as libraries need to re-fund social sciences and humanities and scholarly monograph publishing and clear funds for new tasks such as institutional repositories, collecting and curating local research works, increasingly including research data.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Dramatic Growth of Open Access December 31, 2012 Full Data Edition

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012-12-31
Abstract: 

Full data for The Dramatic Growth of Open Access, Dec. 31, 2012.

Document type: 
Dataset

Dramatic Growth of Open Access December 11, 2012 Full Data Edition

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012-12-11
Abstract: 

Full data for the Dramatic Growth of Open Access.

Document type: 
Other