Library Staff Papers and Publications

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Librarians Have Left the Building: Ask Us HERE! at Simon Fraser University

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2004
Abstract: 

It’s the next step in reference and information services – librarians are leaving the library and providing in-person reference services in areas on campus where students congregate.

Document type: 
Article

Evidence based librarianship and open access

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2006
Abstract: 

Evidence based practice, whether in librarianship or any other profession, depends on access to the evidence, and access to opportunities to share one’s own evidence. Open access (OA) is the perfect complement to evidence based librarianship. OA provides the optimum access to the evidence for librarians everwhere, and the optimum means of dissemination. This article compares examines access to the LIS literature in the print and electronic media, and the impact of open access.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Creators of the Commons

Author: 
Date created: 
2006-06
Abstract: 

The Commons, a term derived from the concept of common grazing ground in simpler times, is now used to describe our shared knowledge-based, and the processes that facilitate or hinder its use. This session focuses on recent activities by Canadian librarians towards creating the commons, through open access and open source approaches. The Canadian Association of Research Libraries, the Canadian Library Association (CLA), and the British Columbia Library Association have policies strongly in support of open access. E-LIS, the open archive for library and information studies, provides a means for librarians to share work through self-archiving, and is an interesting example of a new type of global collaboration. CLA's Evidence Based Librarianship Interest Group has developed a new, international, peer-reviewed open access journal, and The Partnership (of library associations across Canada) has another in the works. A new concept of open source scholarship (open sharing of content, rather than software) is explored, with examples such as the Human Genome Project and Useful Chemistry. Canadian librarian scholarly blogging and wikis are discussed. It is concluded that the commons offers new opportunities for sharing and global collaborations, the like of which we have never seen before. It will be important to develop copyright laws that facilitate sharing, not just intellectual property protection.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Open Access: Policy, Academic, and University Perspectives

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2006-06-16
Abstract: 

The landscape of scholarly communications is transforming into an Open Access environment. Policies are being set by national funding agencies and universities, among others. This session will present an overview of major policy issues, the academic (teaching faculty) perspective on open access publishing and self-archiving and what it all means in the real-world university (library) environment.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Creating a Digital Commons

Date created: 
2006-04-21
Abstract: 

The phrase information commons refers to our shared knowledge base. Heather Morrison presents examples of the commons in action, ranging from open access and open source scholarly resources to the blogosphere. The concept of sampling in music is discussed, and applied to librarianship. Key policy for the commons are identified and discussed, including open access, telecommunications issues (net neutrality, access issues), and copyright laws that facilitate sharing.

Olivier Charbonneau presents "tools for the shepherd", or when digital projects are fit for collaboration, in the context of Lessig's regulatory framework, Benkler's "commons based peer production" framework, and Alter's "Work Centered Analysis Framework for Systems Analysis". The Canadian Legal Information Institute (CANLII), created to enable free access to authoritative versions of Canadian case law and statutes on the Internet through a uniform search interface, is presented as an example of a collaboratively produced digital commons.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Libraries Sharing Technology for Sharing

Date created: 
2006-04-22
Abstract: 

Recent resource sharing technology developments in the western Canadian consortia, BC Electronic Library Network and COPPUL are discussed. Highlights include the shelf status project of BC ELN, combining the functionality of a union catalogue with live lookup of circulation status via Z39.50, a tagging feature for the locally developed A to Z list CJDB (CUFTS Journal Database), a locally developed federated search tool, dbwiz, the Open Journal Systems software of the Public Knowledge Project, and the COPPUL Animated Tutorials Sharing Project.

Document type: 
Conference presentation
File(s): 

Research, IT and SFU Library

Author: 
Date created: 
2006-05-08
Abstract: 

Beyond traditional support for research, SFU Library provides a variety of other services. These include software support such as reSearcher (federated searching, link resolving, requesting and citation management)and the PKP suite (OJS, OCS and metadata harvester), institutional repository for research results and supporting documents, and digitized collections and digitization support.

Document type: 
Conference presentation
File(s): 

Open Access for the Medical Librarian

Date created: 
2006-05-14
Abstract: 

The most important aspects of open access for the medical librarian are presented. Reasons for open access include access to research information, access to taxpayer-funded research, facilitation of evidence-based medicine, equity of access, promotion of author control, and controlling library costs. The two primary approaches to open access, via author self-archiving and open access publishing, are presented. Key open access policy developments are highlighted. Many of the major policy initiatives of the moment are from the research funders. From the researcher funders' point of view, open access means more research impact, more real-world impact when professionals can access the literature, and value is illustrated to the taxpayer, building support for further research funding. The world's largest medical research funders, including the U.S. National Institute of Health and the Wellcome Trust, have public access policies, and many more policies are in development. For example, two weeks ago the Federal Research Public Access Act was introduced in the U.S. Senate. One of the essential elements of open access policy is ensuring that researchers are required, not requested, to deposit works. In Canada, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research has a policy in development called Access to Products of Research; public comments are due May 15, 2006. The dramatic growth of open access - over 2,220 journals in DOAJ, over 7.3 million items in an OAIster search - is discussed, as is the idea of new roles for librarians in an open access environment.

Document type: 
Conference presentation
File(s): 

Academic Libraries & IT depts in the Open Source Environment: the Management viewpoint

Date created: 
2007-06-11
Abstract: 

Academic libraries who use open source software have particular requirements in their relationship with campus IT departments.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

From the Big Picture to Those Pesky Details: Starting a Digitization Project in Your Library

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2006-04-20
Abstract: 

Outlines the major issues a library must consider when planning a digitization project.

Document type: 
Conference presentation