Library Staff Papers and Publications

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Approaches to Copyright Education for Faculty in Canada

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2016
Abstract: 

This study surveyed copyright administrators at Canadian universities about their methods of providing copyright training to faculty and non-faculty instructors, the frequency and topics of education provided, and the modes of communication used to reach instructors. Copyright administrators were also asked to rate the perceived effectiveness of their educational opportunities. Respondents feel that in-person education is most effective for providing copyright training to instructors, though a significant number of respondents do not believe that all instructors at their institutions are made adequately aware of copyright educational opportunities. Lack of time and staffing resources affect many copyright administrators. These challenges are leading many to develop more systematic approaches to reaching instructors. Communication and education are being provided directly to individual departments and by working with administrators and others at the department level. Considering the siloed nature of many copyright offices and positions, this study aims to share the approaches being taken by copyright administrators to educate instructors about their rights and responsibilities with regard to copyright and teaching.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

The TechBC Memory Project: From Summit to Digitized Collections

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Abstract: 

This document describes the process and workflow of the TechBC Memory Project, a collection of oral history interviews that contributes to the historical record of SFU Surrey. The interviews were conducted in 2014 and 2015 and were initially uploaded to Summit, SFU's research repository. In 2016 the PI received a grant for transcriptions and indexing assistance and went on study leave to enhance the interviews' usability and accessibility. The transcripts were edited, indexed, and summarized offline, converted to XML, and uploaded to the OHMS (the Oral History Metadata Synchronizer) application. The collection then moved to SFU Digitized Collections on its new Islandora platform. The interviews now include the OHMS viewer, transcripts and photographs, as well as new searchable metadata fields including keywords, summaries, and a proper name index.

Document type: 
Technical Report

Risk Management Copyright Policy Framework for SFU Library Digitization Projects

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2016-07
Abstract: 

This document, prepared by the SFU Copyright Office, outlines a risk management approach to copyright in regards to digitization projects. This framework describes how the SFU Copyright Office will assess the risk level associated with digitizing and disseminating third party copyright protected material where it is not feasible or possible to contact rights holders. The framework includes an introduction to the approach, the form and guidelines used by the SFU Copyright Office to make a risk assessment, and the protocol for responding to takedown requests.

Document type: 
Technical Report
File(s): 

Archivematica As a Service: COPPUL’s Shared Digital Preservation Platform

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015-06
Abstract: 

The Council of Prairie and Pacific University Libraries (COPPUL) is piloting a cloud-based preservation service using the Archivematica digital preservation system. The service is offered to COPPUL member institutions that wish to preserve digital holdings but prefer a hosted service to installing and managing local Archivematica instances. This service is a joint effort of COPPUL, Artefactual Systems (Archivematica lead developers), and University of British Columbia (UBC) Library (the cloud storage provider). COPPUL is responsible for promoting the service, signing up new institutions and seeding the one-time set- up costs. Artefactual Systems provides account administration, installation, server administration, and user technical support. UBC Library provides fee-based server hosting and digital object storage service. This article discusses COPPUL’s Archivematica-as-a-service model generally and covers certain aspects of implementation in greater detail, concluding with a discussion of future directions.

Document type: 
Article

Librarians as Faculty Association Participants: An Autoethnography

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

"Librarians have fought and continue to fight for academic status; however once achieved, we have found the label of “academic” to not always be comfortable. Within our community of librarians, questions have been raised regarding our taking on any status beyond that of professional librarian.[1]In spite of this, the reality is that most Canadian university librarians do have academic or faculty status, and are required, through collective agreements or employment contracts, to perform as academics

[1] Blaise Cronin, “The Mother of all Myths,” Library Journal, 126 no. 3 (2001): 144."

Document type: 
Book chapter

Managing Discovery and Linking Services

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015-05-27
Abstract: 

There is a growing trend towards a consolidation of services for Electronic Resource Management (ERM), A-Z journal listings, full text link resolving and discovery services under a single service provider. In many cases, the adoption of a discovery service from a provider that is not the same as the libraries' existing link resolver service means managing multiple knowledgebases. In this session, 3 libraries will provide an overview of their experience and strategies for maintaining separate link resolving and discovery services in lieu of adopting a full suite of services from a single service provider. Each speaker will provide a case study on the advantages and/or challenges of managing their chosen discovery service, EBSCO's EDS, Ex Libris' Primo and ProQuest's Summon, in conjunction with the CUFTS/GODOT open source knowledgebase/link resolver.

Document type: 
Article
Conference presentation

Collocation and collaboration: Perspectives from Front Line Service Staff

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014-04-01
Abstract: 

This presentation discussed the impact on both staff and patrons of the renovations on the main floor of the library. During the renovations the Reference Desk and the Loans Desk moved from their separate locations to one central desk. This desk is located at the entrance of the library, making it easier for patrons to find. The information is presented in a before, during, and after format while highlighting patron experience, staff communication, and workplace dynamics.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Consortial print archiving: perspectives from Canada

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

Presents a Canadian perspective on consortial shared print programs among research libraries.

Document type: 
Article

Automating the Preservation of Electronic Theses and Dissertations with Archivematica

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2013-08
Abstract: 

This poster describes the tools, services, and workflows that Simon Fraser University is using to automate the movement of its ETDs (Electronic Theses and Dissertations) from its user-facing Thesis Registration System to the Archivematica digital preservation platform. The poster also describes Simon Fraser University’s plans to expand its digital preservation services using Archivematica, including integration of LOCKSS as a distributed storage network for content managed by Archivematica.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Open Access Publishing in Canada: Current and Future Library and University Press Supports

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2013-06
Abstract: 

Canadian university libraries, Canadian university presses, and non-university scholarly presses at Canadian universities were surveyed in the first part of 2010 as to the level of their support of Open Access (OA) journal publishing. Respondents were asked about journal hosting services in their organization as well as their thoughts on internal and external support for open access publishing. Results showed that most of the organizations are hosting OA journals, largely between one and five in number, and many supply journal hosting services, including some technical support. Personnel resources are a notable factor in the ability to host journals. Most respondents engage in some sort of internal support for open access publishing and are open to options that they are presently not utilizing. They are particularly amenable to OA publishing support from outside of their organizations, especially assistance at a consortial level.

Document type: 
Article