SIAT Graduate Student Publications

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Detecting Spatial Orientation Demands during Virtual Navigation using EEG Brain Sensing

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2017-10-24
Abstract: 

This study shows how brain sensing can offer insight to the evaluation of human spatial orientation in virtual reality (VR) and establish a role for electroencephalogram (EEG) in virtual navigation. Research suggests that the evaluation of spatial orientation in VR benefits by goingbeyond performance measures or questionnaires to measurements of the user’s cognitive state. While EEG has emerged as a practical brain sensing technology in cognitive research, spatial orientation tasks often rely on multiple factors (e.g., reference frame used, ability to update simulated rotation, and/or left-right confusion) which may be inaccessible to this measurement. EEG has been shown to correlate with human spatial orientation in previous research. In this paper, we use convolutional neural network (CNN), an advanced technique in machine learning, to train a detection model that can identify moments in which VR users experienced some increase in spatial orientation demands in real-time. Our results demonstrate that we can indeed use machine learning technique to detect such cognitive state of increasing spatial orientation demands in virtual reality research with 96% accurate on average.

Document type: 
Conference presentation
File(s): 

Designing Cultural Values into Interaction

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2017-05
Abstract: 

In this paper, we highlight possibilities for designing intangible cultural values into interactions with technologies in heritage spaces. We do this specifically through the design of ʔeləәw̓ k̓ʷ — Belongings, an interactive tangible table installed in a cultural heritage museum. The tabletop was collaboratively designed to communicate complex and narrative information and values about Musqueam culture. Rather than focusing only on content and interface design, we wanted visitors to also experience Musqueam values through their interactions with the system. We describe our value-sensitive design process, present five interdependent design goals, discuss the design strategies that enabled us to meet these goals, and evaluate our approach through a user study. From our design process and evaluation we offer recommendations for designing values into interactions more generally and for tangible interactions specifically in ways that support visitors’ experience and understanding of specific cultural values through technology.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Revealing Somatic Experiences in Dance Performance

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011
Document type: 
Conference presentation
File(s): 

The Tiresias Effect: Feedforward using Light versus Temperature in a Tangible User Interface

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2010-04
Abstract: 

In this paper we discuss how light and temperature information can be designed to affect feedforward in a tangible user interface (TUI). In particular we focus on temperature, which has not been widely considered as a mode of information representation in feedback or feedforward. We describe a prototype that implements both information modes in a TUI. Finally, we outline a user study in which these modes are explored as feedforward coaching devices for a decision-making task. The expected outcomes are an understanding of the role of temperature as information for feedforward in TUIs and a set of design guidelines for designers of tangibles working with these physical characteristics.