SIAT Faculty Publications

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Artificial intelligence systems in new media art and design

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2006-08
Abstract: 

Science and art are merging and with artificial intelligence system like neural networks, genetic programs and rule based systems, artists or designers are using smart systems that allow them to better immerse themselves in the creative process. Artist/Scientist Steve DiPaola uses AI techniques in his self created programs and artwork.

Document type: 
Article

Evolving creative portrait painter programs using Darwinian techniques with an automatic fitness function

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2005-07
Abstract: 

We experiment with computer creativity by employing and modifying techniques from evolutionary computation to create a related family of abstract portrait painter programs. In evolutionary art, most systems evolve paintings by allowing the artist to selectively breed the artwork 'by hand' from a selection of the currently evolved population. Our system differs in that it uses an automatic 'creative fitness function' which allows the evolutionary process to run without stopping for 'creative human intervention'. A recent type of Genetic Programming (GP) is used called Cartesian GP, which has several features that allow our system to favour creative solutions over optimized solutions.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Computationally rendered painterly portrait spaces

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2008-10
Abstract: 

This work is ongoing output from research work by Steve DiPaola that attempts to build a computational painting system (called ‘painterly’) that allows aspects of art (the creative human act of fine art painting) and science (cognition, vision and perception; as well as computational design) to both enhance and validate each other. The research takes a novel approach to non photorealistic rendering (NPR) which relies on parameterizing a semantic knowledge space of how a human painter paints, that is, the creative and cognitive process.

Document type: 
Article

Applying Principles from Performance Arts for an Interactive Aesthetic Experience

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2005
Abstract: 

Heightening tension and drama in 3-D interactive environments is a hard, but important problem. It is important for its potential utility in increasing motivation, involvement, engagement, and providing an overall pleasing aesthetic experience. These constructs are not only useful for entertainment applications, but can also impact training and edutainment applications due to the impact of emotions on learning. To stimulate emotional engagement, many researchers have explored several techniques, including enhancing the story content, developing new algorithms for dynamically creating stunning visual effects, and enhancing 3-D sound. In this paper, I describe a set of new design techniques based on a study of film and theatre theories, including acting and screenwriting. These design techniques are integrated within a multiagent interactive drama architecture. In this paper, I will discuss this architecture elaborating on the implementation of the theories studied and discussed from film and performance arts.

Document type: 
Article

Automating Lighting Design for Interactive Entertainment

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2004
Abstract: 

Recent advances in computer graphics, particularly in real-time rendering, have resulted in major improvements in 3D graphics and rendering techniques in interactive entertainment. In this article we focus on the scenelighting process, which we define as configuring the number of lights in a scene, their properties (e.g., range and attenuation), positions, angles, and colors. Lighting design is well known among designers, directors, and visual artists for its vital role in influencing viewers' perception by evoking moods, directing their gaze to important areas (i.e., providing visual focus), and conveying visual tension. It is, however, difficult to set positions, angles, or colors for lights within interactive scenes to accommodate these goals because an interactive scene?s spatial and dramatic configuration, including mood, dramatic intensity, and the relative importance of different characters, change unpredictably in real-time. There are several techniques developed by the game industry that establish spectacular real-time lighting effects within 3D interactive environments. These techniques are often time- and labor-intensive. In addition, they are not easily used to dynamically mold the visual design to convey communicative, dramatic, and aesthetic functions as addressed in creative disciplines such as art, film, and theatre. In this article we present a new real-time lighting design model based on cinematic and theatric lighting design theory. The proposed model is designed to automatically, and in realtime, adjust lighting in an interactive scene to accommodate the dramatic, aesthetic, and communicative functions described by traditional lighting design theories, while taking artistic constraints on style, visual continuity, and aesthetic function into account.

Document type: 
Article

An Interactive Narrative Architecture Based on Filmmaking Theory

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2004
Abstract: 

Designing and developing an interactive narrative experience includes development of story content as well as a visual composition plan for visually realizing the story content. Theatre directors, filmmakers, and animators have emphasized the importance of visual design. Choices of character placements, lighting configuration, and camera movements, have been documented by designers to have direct impact on communicating the narrative, evoking emotions and moods, and engaging viewers. Many research projects focused on adapting the narrative content to the interaction, yet little attention was given to adapting the visual presentation. In this paper, I present a new approach to interactive narrative – an approach based on filmmaking theory. I propose an interactive narrative architecture, that in addition to dynamically selecting narrative events that suit the continuously changing situation, it automatically, and in real-time, reconfigures the visual design integrating camera movements, lighting modulation, and character movements. The architecture utilizes rules extracted from filmmaking, cinematography, and visual arts theories. I argue that such adaptation will lead to increased engagement and enriched interactive narrative experience.

Document type: 
Article

Affective communication remapping in MusicFace System

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2004-07
Abstract: 

This paper addresses the issue of affective communication remapping, i.e. translation of affective content from one communication form to another. We propose a method to extract the affective data from a piece of music and then use that to animate a face. The method is based on studies of emotional aspect of music and our behavioural head model for face animation.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

IT Education, Girls, and Game Modding

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2006
Abstract: 

Researchers have argued that video games have great utility for learning. Games promote experiential learning and can be used to facilitate active learning. This paper examines the potential of video games in education. In particular, it examines the benefits of game modding compared to playing and/or creating games. However, video game classes have been primarily attended by male students. This paper looks further into the gender issue regarding the use of video game modding in education. This is demonstrated through a course developed by the authors on game design. The main goal of the course was to introduce middle school and high school female students to IT and assist them in acquiring five basic IT skills. During the course, survey data was collected from participating students. Results from the surveys as well as analysis of student projects and anecdotal evidence suggest that using video game modding is successful in increasing self-efficacy and motivation as well as teaching female students basic IT skills.

Document type: 
Article

DigitalBeing: An Ambient Intelligence Interactive Dance Experience

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

This chapter seeks to explore the development of an ambient intelligent dance space. In particular, the chapter proposes intelligent systems that use non-linear optimization as well as symbolic rule-based systems to adjust sound/music, on-stage lighting, and projected visual imagery in terms of movement and color to dynamically reflecting the dancer’s arousal state measured through physiological sensors worn by the dancers. To aesthetically adjust physical lighting around the dancers, dancer’s location will need to be identified. This variable will be identified using pressure sensor mats installed on the floor to track dancers’ movements. Data from these sensors will be passed into a three layered architecture. Layer 1 is composed of a sensor analysis system that analyzes and synthesizes physiological and pressure sensor signals. Layer 2 is composed of intelligent systems that adapt lighting, sound/music, and visual imagery in terms of pacing and colors to portray the dancer’s arousal state. The intelligent physical lighting system dynamically adjusts physical lighting color. The intelligent sound/music system dynamically and unobtrusively adjusts the music/ sound in the space. The virtual projected imagery will be created using a cellular automata system that will be intelligently manipulated in terms of cell colors to reflect the arousal state and position of the dancer. Layer 3 translates the high-level adjustments made by the intelligent systems in layer 2 to appropriate lighting board and audio box commands. Using this architecture we seek to extend the mode of dance expression offering a space that performance artists can use as a creative tool that extends the grammar of dance. In this chapter, we will describe this architecture in detail as well as the equipment, control systems, and Artificial Intelligence algorithms used.

Document type: 
Book chapter

A 3D virtual environment for social telepresence

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2002-03
Abstract: 

We examine OnLive Traveler as a case study. Traveler is a clientserver application allowing real-time synchronous communication between individuals over the Internet. The Traveler client interface presents the user with a shared virtual 3D world, in which participants are represented by avatars. The primary mode of communication is through multi-point, full duplex voice, managed by the server. Our design goal was to develop a virtual community system that emulates natural social paradigms, allowing the participants to sense a tele-presence, the subjective sensation that remote users are actually co-located within a virtual space. Once this level of immersive "sense of presence" and engagement is achieved, we believe an enhanced level of socialization, learning, and communication are achievable. We examine a number of very specific design and implementation decisions that were made to achieve this goal within platform constraints. We also will detail some observed results gleaned from the virtual community userbase, which has been online for several years

Document type: 
Conference presentation