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Coach House Press in the ‘Early Digital’ Period: A Celebration

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015-10
Abstract: 

Traces the early history of digital publishing innovation at Toronto's Coach House Press, a key player in Canadian book publishing who, since the 1970s, were also instrumental in the development of digital typesetting, SGML and XML, and online publishing.

 

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Reassembling Scholarly Communications: An Evaluation of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation’s Monograph Initiative

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2016-05
Abstract: 

This report is a consideration of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation's 2014–2015 scholarly communications initiative, which focused on helping to develop new capacity in the monograph-publishing ecosystem.

This report looks at thirteen projects funded through the initiative in 2014 and 2015. The proposals came from different stakeholders in the monograph ecosystem: university presses, libraries, faculty, and one consulting organization. They include studies of the economics of monograph publishing; plans to develop new faculty or staff competencies; the development of new software systems to support the pro-duction or publication of scholarly works; and the development of new operation and business models that aim to streamline and find efficiencies in the infrastruc-ture for producing and distributing scholarly works.

The range of the funded projects is very broad. This appears to be a result of the open-ended way the Mellon Foundation invited proposals; innovation in digital publishing is an experimental process requiring imagination, an open mind and relative freedom from preexisting drivers and operational assumptions. The Foun-dation's approach seems to have been to seek out interesting projects and ideas in a variety of places, and to look for opportunities to help move these ideas forward, without being overly directive about particular outcomes. This, we believe, is ap-propriate to the task of advancing a very complex tradition of scholarly communi-cation, especially in an apparent time of crisis.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Editing without Author(ity): Martha Ostenso, Periodical Studies, and the Digital Turn

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2016-02
Abstract: 

“Good Morning, Son” serves as a useful example of how an editorial intervention might allow for a revitalized approach to Ostenso’s work from the perspectives of collaborative authorship, periodical studies, and middlebrow studies. I hope to illustrate how a text-based and author-centric editorial approach elides much of what makes Ostenso an interesting literary figure, whereas a digital social-text edition – or archive, or database, or arsenal  – provides a variety of lenses through which her work can be productively revisited or, in the case of the short stories, encountered for the first time.

Document type: 
Book chapter

Remediation and the Development of Modernist Forms in The Western Home

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2016-11
Abstract: 

This chapter will proceed in four parts. First, we will articulate our argument for reading The Western Home Monthly through the lens of modernism by exploring the links that have been drawn recently between modernism, the middlebrow, and new media studies. Second, we will outline the method through which The Western Home Monthly was digitized and the tools we used in our analysis. The third section will demonstrate how our distant reading methods helped us to better understand the formal dimensions of the magazine, particularly in terms of the influence of advertising and increasing formal fragmentation. In our fourth section we will analyse a single issue of The Western Home Monthly, showing how a combination of distant and close readings helps us to understand the place of an agrarian middlebrow magazine within the transnational and intermedial phenomenon of modernist culture.

Document type: 
Book chapter

Twitter Bot Surveys: A Discrete Choice Experiment to Increase Response Rates

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2017-07-28
Abstract: 

This paper presents a new methodology---the Twitter bot survey---that bridges the gap between social media research and web surveys. The methodology uses the Twitter APIs to identify a target population and then uses the API to deliver a question in the form of a regular Tweet. We hypothesized that this method would yield high response rates because users are posed a question within the social media platform and are not asked, as is the case with most web surveys, to follow a link away to a third party. To evaluate the response rate and identify the most effective mechanism for increasing it, we conducted a discrete choice experiment that evaluated three factors: question type, the use of an egoistic appeal, and the presence of contextual information. We found that, similar to traditional web surveys, multiple choice questions, egoistic appeals, and contextual information all contributed to higher response rates. Question variants that combined all three yielded a 40.0% response rate, thereby outperforming most other web surveys and demonstrating the promise of this new methodology. The approach can be extended to any other social media platforms where users typically interact with one another. The approach also offers the opportunity to bring together the advantages of social media research using APIs with the richness of information that can be collected from surveys.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

On the Peripheries of Scholarly Infrastructure: A Look at the Journals Using Open Journal Systems

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2016-09
Abstract: 

The Public Knowledge Project (PKP) is a research and development initiative of Simon Fraser University and Stanford University, with a focus on understanding and building enhanced modes of scholarly communication that facilitate open access, high quality publishing, and local capacity building and participation. One of the most significant contributions from PKP has been the development of its free, open source Open Journal Systems (OJS) software. Although some existing publishers have made use of the system, the majority of OJS users are new to publishing and are based in academia, either through library publishing programs or by individual "scholar-publishers," determined to build communities of interest around their research areas (Edgar & Willinsky, 2010). Most are small-scale, often operating with in-kind contributions and minimal budgets (Edgar & Willinsky, 2010). This type of use suggests an increased participation in scholarship, both in terms of who publishes and who read.

Document type: 
Conference presentation
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