Simon Fraser University Undergraduate Collection

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This collection contains undergraduate honours theses and certain other selected undergraduate works by SFU undergraduate students.

“A Pointless Death, A Horrible Death”: The Role of Small Animals in Chiri Yukie’s Ainu Shin’yōshū.

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-08-24
Abstract: 

“Therefore, rabbits of the future, take heed not to make mischief” proclaims the rabbit narrator at the end of “The Song the Rabbit God Sang” (28). This Ainu Oral Story is just one of thirteen recorded in Chiri Yukie’s Ainu Shin’yōshū (Collection of Ainu Chants of Spiritual Beings). In this paper, I examine “The Song the Rabbit Sang” alongside two other stories from Chiri’s collection, “The Song the Otter Sang” and “The Song the Frog Sang”, which characterize their animal narrators as mischievous ‘trickster’ figures. These stories follow a similar narrative structure wherein the ‘trickster’ animal defies an understood social boundary between itself and humans, is subsequently punished for its wrongdoing, and ultimately learns an important lesson which it shares with others of its species. Through examining these recurring narrative elements, I argue that the relationship between Ainu and these smaller, less symbolic animals as expressed in Oral Story reflects a complex system of reciprocity that lies at the heart of Ainu relationships with their land, spirits (Kamui), and the nonhuman world.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Melek Ortabasi
Department: 
World Literature

Reforms, Regulations, and Rationalism: The Female Reproductive Emancipation in Weimar Germany, 1918-1933

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2020-04-10
Abstract: 

Bevölkerungspolitik, population politics, shaped the politics of gender and sexuality during the Weimar Republic. With birth rates falling by the year in the post-war period, Germany was having a crisis. The state implemented different services to promote children among married couples, such as sexual and marital counselling. These reforms were based on eugenics, such increased access to birth control to prevent people the state though undesirable from reproducing. The emancipation and liberalization in Weimar Germany are well established in literature, however many historians have neglected the contribution of the need to control reproduction to these topics. This article aims to provide an overview of the ways in which the need to control female bodies influenced the liberalization of sexuality and reproduction for women. The ideologies of sex reformers were permeated by beliefs about eugenics and that women were meant to be mothers. The government and reformers brought sexual education to the public, with the purpose of creating pleasurable marriages to ensure children. This article investigates primary sources and the historiography of the period to support the argument that female emancipation was not truly achieved because the state maintained control over female bodies and reproduction.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Lauren Faulkner Rossi
Department: 
History
Thesis type: 
Honours (Bachelor of Arts)

Witnessing Extermination: Using Diaries to Understand the Final Solution in Poland

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2020-04-10
Abstract: 

Based largely upon diaries and memoirs, this case study of Poland questions when various peoples in Poland understood what the “Final Solution” was. By January 1942, the “Final Solution” had been finalized as extermination, mainly through the gas chambers. As violence to the Jews grew more extreme, the populace started to take notice of events. As Poland was the center of the “Final Solution” and the extermination centers. This article analyses when people in Poland understood the deadly nature of the “Final Solution.” Through analysis based largely on diaries, this article details how those in Poland noticed the horrors of “Final Solution” within the first year of its enaction.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Lauren Rossi
Department: 
History
Thesis type: 
Honours (Bachelor of Arts)

“What Can We Say to the Poor People Now?”: Anti-Establishment Vaccine Rejection and Slow Violence in the 1885 Smallpox Epidemic

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2020-04-17
Abstract: 

When smallpox began spreading through Montreal in 1885, many refused the vaccine that may have spared 3,000 lives and prevented 19,905 other cases of the disease. Thus far, the literature on the epidemic has linked anti-vaccination sentiment to the linguistic and ethnic identity of Montreal’s French-Canadian Catholic population. Using Rob Nixon's concept of slow violence, this thesis argues that the rejection of public health measures by working-class French Canadians was an anti-establishment reaction to the interventions of a city whose industrialization and urbanization had worsened and ignored other pressing environmental and health concerns.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Mary-Ellen Kelm
Department: 
History
Thesis type: 
Honours (Bachelor of Arts)

Bayesian Reverse Ecology using Mutual Information

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2020-04-01
Abstract: 

In stochastic biological systems, it is difficult to predict how the state of the system will evolve in response to a dynamic environment. Various attempts have been proposed in different literature. Some papers contain extreme simplicity in the system or suggest a potentially misleading method. In this study, we propose methodology to infer properties of the environment in which an observed system may have evolved: “reverse ecology”. Here, the system can be a cell, and the environment can be everything else other than the cell. We aim to understand the success of a given system compared to all other possible systems in the given environment. From this, we infer the environment that is the most likely one for the system to have arisen in. This Bayesian approach is applied as an inference method that is different from the existing methods. Two different model systems, Poisson distributions and negative binomial distributions, are applied to infer the evolutionary environment from an observed system.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
David Sivak
Department: 
Physics
Thesis type: 
Bachelor of Science

Optimal Control of Electron Transfer

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2020-04-01
Abstract: 

We investigate a model that allows us to look at electron transfer in the fast-hopping regime. Using recent developments in the study of non-equilibrium processes, we compute optimal protocols which minimize the excess work required to drive the system from one control parameter value to another. Using these protocols, we evolve the system using Fokker-Planck dynamics to calculate how successful these protocols are over a variety of parameter values. We find that in using these protocols there is a trade-off between reducing the dissipation and successfully transferring the electron.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
David Sivak
Department: 
Physics
Thesis type: 
Honours Bachelor of Science

The Interaction of Climate Change with Territorial Sovereignty: Tuvalu as a Case Study

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2020-04-26
Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Nicholas Blomley
Department: 
Geography
Thesis type: 
BA Environment (Honours)

Dark Sector Cosmic Fluid Interactions as a Solution to the Observed Disagreement in Measurements of the Hubble Expansion Rate

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2019-04-24
Abstract: 

The standard cosmological model, known as the ΛCDM model, is the simplest model that accurately describes a variety of aspects of the Universe, including the cosmic microwave background (CMB), large scale structure, and accelerated expansion. Independent observational data, including data from the CMB, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), and supernovae type Ia (SNe Ia) provide significant statistical support for the ΛCDM model. Despite this support the Hubble expansion rate determined from these observations is inconsistent with direct measurements, presenting a tension of over 4σ. In this examination we attempt to alleviate this tension by looking at an important assumption of the ΛCDM model, the assumption that the energy densities of the different cosmic fluid components evolve independently. To test this we consider pairwise interactions between dark sector cosmic fluid components by introducing terms which allow for energy exchange between components to the right hand side of the Friedmann fluid equations. Making use of Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods we find that energy exchange between cold dark matter (CDM) and dark energy can correct for the discrepancy between CMB measurements of the Hubble expansion rate and direct measurements, but that adding the BAO measurements to the analysis prevents this tension from being fully alleviated. Our findings suggest dark sector cosmic fluid interactions are a strong candidate for physics beyond ΛCDM and warrant additional research.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Levon Pogosian
Department: 
Science: Department of Physics
Thesis type: 
Honours Bachelor of Science

Improving Inference via Perturbations

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2019-04
Abstract: 

Cellular networks in biological systems are complex and as such, identifying the molecular interactions that give rise to the complex behavior observed can require an immense amount of data. Often, statistical and machine learning techniques are used to analyze this data and extract a global picture of network dynamics. One of the challenges of network analysis in systems biology is finding the connections between genes, proteins, or both, and predicting additional ones that have not yet been detected experimentally. This problem is easily mappable to the inverse problem of statistical physics: inferring the microscopic particle-particle interactions given macroscopic observations of a system. In particular, the focus of this work is to investigate whether perturbations can be introduced into the system so as to improve the output data quality. Specifically, we explore how perturbations in the form of magnetic field can be used to improve the inference of interactions for a three-spin Ising system. Utilizing a maximum likelihood approach, we empirically show that there exists an optimal field where learning is most ecient. Such a field seems to counteract the individual interactions between spins, allowing for optimal inference.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
David Sivak
Department: 
Science: Department of Physics
Thesis type: 
Honours Bachelor of Science

Energy Dissipation and Information Flow in Coupled Markovian Systems

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2016-04
Abstract: 

A stochastic system under the influence of a stochastic environment will become correlated with both present and future states of the environment. Such a system can be seen as a predictive model of future environmental states. The non-predictive model complexity in such a model has been shown in a recent paper to be fundamentally equivalent to thermodynamic dissipation. In this dissertation, this abstract result is explored in concrete models in order to illustrate how it emerges in realistic systems. In steady-state, this model complexity is found to be the dominant form of dissipation when the system is strongly driven and quick to relax back to equilibrium. Model complexity being the dominant form of dissipation is shown to be equivalent to the rate at which the system learns about its environment being large compared to the heat dissipation.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
David Sivak
Department: 
Science: Department of Physics
Thesis type: 
Honours Bachelor of Science