Indigenous Testimony/io Oral Testimony (2012)

Receive updates for this collection

Bonnie Fournier 'Missing Women's Commission of Inquiry' Testimony 1 Part I

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012-06-28
Abstract: 

Registered Psychiatric nurse Bonnie Fournier talks about what it was like working as a nurse in the courthouse holding cells and then later on, operating the DEYAS (Downtown eastside youth Activities) Van with assistant Manny Cu, for 13 years and how she became like a mother to all the survival sex workers. She would dispense medical care, clean needles, condoms or counseling to anyone who needed it. She was like a second mother to many of the people who knew her. She speaks openly about losing many of the women she cared for to serial murderer Robert Pickton.

Document type: 
Video
File(s): 
Bonnie Fournier Testimonial 1 (a) SUMMIT_new.mp4
Bonnie Fournier Testimonial 1 (b) SUMMIT.mp4
Bonnie Fournier Testimonial 1 (c) Summit.mp4

Ernie Crey 'Missing Women's Commission of Inquiry'

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012-03-12
Abstract: 

The Missing Women’s Commission of Inquiry was held in Vancouver in 2012 examining the Vancouver Police and the Coquitlam RCMP's handling of the case of missing and murdered female sex workers, in Vancouver's downtown eastside community, the majority of whom were aboriginal. Eventually serial murder charges and a conviction were issued against Robert Pickton. Ernie Crey, brother to Dawn Crey, whose DNA was found at the Pickton property, talks about the Missing Women’s Inquiry being inadequate to deal with the issues of poverty prejudice toward aboriginals and police ignorance toward survival sex workers and drug addicts, due to the inquiry’s predetermined terms of reference. Crey states that the terms of reference were already predetermined by the provincial government, and there would be no opportunity for any outside aboriginal influence.  This is unfortunate since many of the Pickton murder victims were aboriginal.

Document type: 
Video
File(s): 
Ernie Crey Testimonial (a) Summit.mp4
Ernie Crey Testimonial (b) Summit.mp4
Ernie Crey Testimonial (c) Summit.mp4

Lori Ann Ellis 'Missing Women's Commission of Inquiry' Testimony 2

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012-08-20
Abstract: 

Lori Ellis’s sister in law Cara Ellis was a survival sex worker in Vancouver’s downtown eastside and was tragically murdered by Robert Pickton. Lori Ellis is a Calgary resident who was at the Vancouver Missing Women’s Inquiry everyday for eight months watching and testifying during the proceedings. She opens up here about her feelings around the inquiry, and how she and others urged the government to start an official inquiry looking into the Vancouver Police and Coquitlam RCMP’s handling of the missing women’s case. She shares how much she loved Cara and how special she was to her, and how devastating it was learning of her tragic death. Lori also reveals how devastating it was losing a loved one, but how she finds strength and love in friends and family. She hopes that eventually one day there will be more resources available to help people cope with the trauma of losing a loved one.

Document type: 
Video
File(s): 
Lori Ann Ellis Testimonial 2 (a) Summit.mp4
Lori Ann Ellis Testimonial 2 (b) Summit.mp4
Lori Ann Ellis Testimonial 2 (c) Summit.mp4

Lori Ann Ellis 'Missing Women's Commission of Inquiry' Testimony 1

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012-03-12
Abstract: 

Lori Ellis’s sister in law Cara Ellis was a survival sex worker in Vancouver’s downtown eastside and was tragically murdered by Robert Pickton. Lori Ellis is a Calgary resident who was at the Vancouver Missing Women’s Inquiry everyday for eight months watching and testifying during the proceedings. She opens up here about her feelings around the inquiry, and how she and others urged the government to start an official inquiry looking into the Vancouver Police and Coquitlam RCMP’s handling of the missing women’s case. She shares how much she loved Cara and how special she was to her, and how devastating it was learning of her tragic death. Lori also reveals how devastating it was losing a loved one, but how she finds strength and love in friends and family. She hopes that eventually one day there will be more resources available to help people cope with the trauma of losing a loved one.

Document type: 
Video
File(s): 
Lori Ann Ellis Testimonial 1 (a) Summit.mp4
Lori Ann Ellis Testimonial 1 (b) Summit.mp4
Lori Ann Ellis Testimonial 1 (c) SUMMIT.mp4

Jackson Dionne 'Native Court Workers Association'

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012-04-30
Abstract: 

Jackson Dionne stated he had a drinking problem after growing up in Fort St. James. Eventually he quit drinking in 1996, and in 1998 went to school to be a counselor. Eventually got a part time job at a youth treatment centre but then left that soon after to get a job with Urban Native Youth Association, and then got job with Native Court worker’s Association. Their mandate is to keep people from using alcohol and drugs by way of offering abstinence counseling. As well as working with Aboriginals in court, they offer detox, family advocate work and offer elder and youth programs for aboriginals in the community.

Document type: 
Video
File(s): 
Jackson Dionne - Native Court Workers Association