Indigenous Environmental Activism (2015)

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Kelly White, 'Indigenous Environmental Activism'

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015-02-27
Abstract: 

Kelly White's ancestory is Musqueam, but she is originally from Cedar, B.C. just outside Snuuneymuxw-otherwise known as, “people of the river.” Kelly later moved to Nanaimo, British Columbia and then to Medicine Hat, Alberta and remembers “environmental justice and the parallel battle for social justice and human rights, starting at birth.” Born premature, she was held in incubation as her mother and father were embroiled in a very long Aboriginal right and title fishing rights court case, eventually lasting from the time of her birth in 1957, until 1963. Kelly recalls her mom and dad’s Coast Salish cultural and environmental justice values always being a part of her upbringing, inspiring her lifelong belief to always respect and protect air, land and water. Kelly reveals that when she was 5 years old, she and some of her siblings were removed from the family and raised in foster care until Kelly was 14. Kelly talks about being 16 in 1974 and travelling from Vancouver to Ottawa, Ontario with the Native People’s Caravan as one of 30 citizens concerned about the horrible living conditions and environmental pollution affecting Canadian aboriginal communities. By the time Kelly was in her early twenties, she had aligned herself with other young activists concerned for aboriginal fishing, hunting and housing rights, as well as many other people concerned about sacred aboriginal homelands used for uranium mining and military operations in Canada and the United States. Kelly discusses her involvement with national and international educational and peacekeeping organizations and how in 1991, she became one of the founding committee members of Vancouver’s Missing and Murdered Women’s Memorial March, which she was still a part of when this testimonial was received. Kelly talks about her inspirations and motivations as a teacher and her work in broadcasting for over 35 years. She currently lives in Vancouver, British Columbia, working in television and film as a producer and director. Kelly has won various community awards recognizing her work in various film and music projects.

Document type: 
Video

Cecilia Point, c̓əsnaʔəm and Indigenous Environmental Activism

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2016-04-02
Abstract: 

 

Cecilia Point talks about her Musqueam heritage, the values she grew up with, her mixed ancestry and how her family came to live in the Musqueam area. Cecilia also talks in depth about c̓əsnaʔəm, the Musqueam seasonal village her community lived in along the Fraser River in what is now South Vancouver. Cecilia tells the story of a developer implementing a construction site on the midden in 2011. The Province did not properly consult with the Musqueam band, so digging on the property commence after permits were issued. As soon as the Musqueam heard what was happening, there was an out crying of support from the community to halt the digging process that had begun. Unfortunately, during the process of the dig, human bones were unearthed and lay in buckets on the property. Cecilia states that the Province refused to stop the digging and were responsible for issuing multiple digging permits to the developer. Soon Cecilia states she was appointed by the community to be a spokesperson to the media and government, stating she took the call to heart. Even when the community held a press conference, started a petition and marched in solidarity, nothing was done to stop the digging by the Province. After 200 hundred days, thankfully the digging permits were no longer issued and the digging stopped. Then the Musqueam were able to remove the skeletal remains and have a proper ceremony for them in community longhouse. The Musqueam were able to purchase the property and want to make it a commemorative community focal point, honouring the village of c̓əsnaʔəm and the people who lived there.

Document type: 
Video

Johnny Jones 'Indigenous Environmental Justice'

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015-02-06
Abstract: 

Johnny Jones talks about what it means to be Lil’wat and how the Lil’wat Nation is an unceded territory -allowing its citizens to fully govern their land, asserting sovereign right and title over the Nation. He recalls that since the age of 5, his family, Elders and community leaders imbued in him the cultural and spiritual responsibility to take care of the land. Buy the age of 16, he was awarded ‘watchmen status’, where it would become he and other watchmen’s life’s work to watch over and care for the land. Today, in coordination with the Land and Resource Department of the Mt. Currie Band Office, Johnny works as ‘Cultural Technician’, where he records and monitors culturally significant sites, so that intruders can legally be kept 50 meters from the areas. Johnny reflects on the Lil’wat Nations’ many court cases, where the Nation defended itself against industrial companies looking to expropriate precious resources and destroy the land. From protecting ancient burial sites and culturally significant pictographs, to protecting trees from clear cutting, the desire and the birthright responsibility to protect the sacred land, has and will always be the first and foremost priority.

Document type: 
Video

Roy Henry Vickers 'Indigenous Environmental Justice'

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015-03-12
Abstract: 

Roy Henry Vickers is an internationally acclaimed artist, carver and author whose atistic style fuses traditional and contemporary froms that seadk to th ereverence of British Columbia, and the natural world as a whole.  He is a recognized leaders in the First Nations community and ahs recelt spoken against Enbridge's proposed Northern Gateway Pipeline.

Document type: 
Video

Lucy Gibot 'Fort Chipewyan, Alberta & the Mikisew First Nation'

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015-03-30
Abstract: 

 

Lucy offers her testimony about growing up in Fort Chipewyan, Alberta and the Mikisew Cree First Nation. She also speaks about her Indian Residential School experience and the changes to the landscape because of the Bennet Dam and the tar sands projects.

Document type: 
Video

Devin Manky Testimony

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015-03-09
Abstract: 

Devin Manky is Wildlife Manager at Refuge for Endangered Wildlife on Grouse Mountain, in North Vancouver, British Columbia. His work with the refuge has focused on the conservation and rehabilitation of Grizzly bears and Black bears, and providing public education and awareness surrounding these issues, while promoting environmental stewardship and sustainability.

Document type: 
Video