SFU Open Access Advocacy Collection

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Open Beyond the Academy: Building Community Through Open Social Scholarship

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2017-10-27
Abstract: 

In this panel from Open Access Week, Dr. Hannah McGregor and Dr. Raymond Siemens discuss how the Digital Humanities can bring academic and non-academic communities together to be more inclusive, accessible, and accountable.

Podcasting, Public Scholarship, and Accountability

Dr. Hannah McGregor, Assistant Professor in Publishing @ SFU

This talk will discuss Dr. McGregor's work on podcasting as scholarly communication and the models of accountability involved in politicized and public-first scholarly work. It will argue that truly open scholarship is not only open-access but also accountable to the communities about which and to which it speaks.

Preconditions for Worthwhile Open Knowledge and Open Scholarship (Thoughts from the Fledgling Canadian Social Knowledge Institute)

Dr. Raymond Siemens, Distinguished Professor in the Faculty of Humanities at the University of Victoria, in English and Computer Science, and past Canada Research Chair in Humanities Computing (2004-15).

What’s needed to encourage and to build open knowledge and open scholarship to scale in a Humanistic context?  Dr. Siemens' talk will work toward answering this question, in the context of initial activities of the recently-established Canadian Social Knowledge Institute.  Open social scholarship involves creating and disseminating research and research technologies to a broad audience of specialists and active non-specialists in ways that are accessible and significant. As a concept, it has grown from roots in open access and open scholarship movements, the digital humanities’ methodological commons and community of practice, contemporary online practices, and public facing “citizen scholarship” to include i) developing, sharing, and implementing research in ways that consider the needs and interests of both academic specialists and communities beyond academia; ii) providing opportunities to co-create, interact with, and experience openly-available cultural data; iii) exploring, developing, and making public tools and technologies under open licenses to promote wide access, education, use, and repurposing; and iv) enabling productive dialogue between academics and non-academics.

Document type: 
Audio
Lecture / Talk
File(s): 
Open Week Talks Hannah.mp3
Open Week Talk Ray.mp3

Failure of Access: Rethinking Open Education - Keynote Presentation

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2017-03-28
Abstract: 

The use of open re-use licenses and Internet technologies have long promised to reduce barriers to education by making it more distributed, equitable, and open. Indeed, the promise of open education can trace its roots to the the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, adopted by the United Nations 1948, which states "everyone has a right to education." However, there is little formal evidence that open education has an impact on increasing access to learning or making education more equitable.

As a collaboration between Simon Fraser University (SFU), University of British Columbia (UBC), BCcampus, British Columbia Research Libraries Group (BCRLG) and the Public Knowledge Project (PKP), this event explored the goals, failures, and successes of open education. The event explored such questions as: is open education succeeding in being a transformative movement that makes learning more accessible? What are the criteria and successes that should be used to measure if the open education movement is a success? What more needs to be done?

Document type: 
Lecture / Talk
Video

Failure of Access: Rethinking Open Education - Panel Discussion

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2017-03-28
Abstract: 

The use of open re-use licenses and Internet technologies have long promised to reduce barriers to education by making it more distributed, equitable, and open. Indeed, the promise of open education can trace its roots to the the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, adopted by the United Nations 1948, which states "everyone has a right to education." However, there is little formal evidence that open education has an impact on increasing access to learning or making education more equitable.

As a collaboration between Simon Fraser University (SFU), University of British Columbia (UBC), BCcampus, British Columbia Research Libraries Group (BCRLG) and the Public Knowledge Project (PKP), this event explored the goals, failures, and successes of open education. The event explored such questions as: is open education succeeding in being a transformative movement that makes learning more accessible? What are the criteria and successes that should be used to measure if the open education movement is a success? What more needs to be done?

Document type: 
Lecture / Talk
Video

Rick Anderson: Reconciling the Needs of Analysis and Advocacy in Scholarly-Communication Reform

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2016-10-25
Abstract: 

Reforming scholarly communication is a tough job, made tougher by factors that include the lack of unanimity among stakeholders as to what reform should look like (or whether it's needed at all); the wide variety of needs and interests among the system's stakeholders; the structural complexity of the system itself; the lack of unanimity as to what "open access" means; the heavy weight of tradition in academic practice; and the high level of emotion that inevitably accompanies discussion of these issues. The difficulty and complexity of the reform project suggest that analysis is needed, but the moral and emotional weight of the issues involved naturally lead us in the direction of advocacy instead—and advocacy and analysis are, unfortunately, natural enemies.

In this session we reviewed salient aspects of the scholarly-communication landscape that make reform particularly challenging, some principles for addressing those challenges, and some possible mechanisms for applying these principles to bridge perspectives, including strategies for including the all-important authors' voice.

Document type: 
Video
File(s): 
Video

Open in Action: A Panel Discussion

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2016-10-25
Abstract: 

The speakers in this panel are individuals who are taking concrete actions that advance the concept of Openness in higher education, scholarship, and the community at large . These panelists talked about initiatives they are involved in, such as those that:-support the development and use of open textbooks-investigate who uses open access journal articles and under what conditions-build infrastructure for scholarly publishing-address community needs for informationSpecifically, the panelists discussed how their work intersects with the idea of "Open" and what motivates them towards putting "Open" into action.

Document type: 
Video
File(s): 
Video