Simon Fraser University Archives and Records Management

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"Are You Ready to Create Digital Records that Last?": Preparing users to transfer records to a digital repository for permanent preservation (article)

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2016
Abstract: 

Simon Fraser University (Vancouver, Canada) marked its 50th anniversary by launching a digital repository to permanently preserve the university’s digital records of archival value. Simultaneously, the records management program launched a digital readiness project to educate departments about how to create digital records that will stand the test of time. This case study focuses on the training component of the project and details how the university is addressing knowledge gaps among records creators around digital records issues by creating training materials that are openly licensed and may be freely reused. Open educational resources or “OERs” are part of a wider open access movement in education. OERs can be created to address digital records issues and then shared with other institutions that are facing similar challenges in training their users on how to create and maintain good digital records.

 

This article explains the efforts of one university to prepare records creators for a future of digital records preservation.

Document type: 
Article

Sharing the RM Toolkit: Panel presentation at Association of Canadian Archivists (video)

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2016-06
Abstract: 

Description of the panel

Universities can work together to address common records problems. University archives in Canada house a wide range of publicly accessible material. The majority of Canadian university archives (60%) also have records management responsibilities, working directly with records creators throughout the life cycle of the record. Attendees will learn how B.C. university records managers created a knowledge-sharing group to overcome limited resources and to collaborate on creating innovative solutions to the records problems shared by all members of the group.

 

This session, moderated by Barbara Towell of the University of British Columbia, begins with the outcomes from a recent survey of twenty Canadian university records management programs undertaken and presented by Shan Jin of Queens University. This research highlights similarities and areas for increasing collaborations to solve common records problems. Other presenters will detail specific innovative solutions to electronic records issues. Jane Morrison from the University of Victoria Archives will describe how integrated information management work over the past few years has expanded UVic's program and focus on the resources that will benefit the community.

Joy Rowe from Simon Fraser University will advocate for creating Creative Commons licensed training tools for records creators that are intended to be repurposed, remixed, and shared online, based on recent efforts at SFU.

 

Session attendees will come away with concrete examples of how informal but regular knowledge-sharing can help professionals facing similar problems in similar institutions achieve their shared goals.

Document type: 
Conference presentation
Video
File(s): 

Minimum metadata for SFU's university records

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2016-05-25
Abstract: 

All digital records have metadata. Digital university records have metadata that is automatically added by the computer system as well as metadata that you add yourself.

 

This document describes the minimum metadata that digital university records need to have at various stages of their life cycle.

 

  • The CREATE metadata relates to metadata that is added (by you or by the computer) as soon as you save the record.
  • The MANAGE metadata relates to metadata that is added (by you or by a well-set up database or application) for any record that has longer term, non-transitory uses.
  • The TRANSFER metadata relates to metadata that is added (by you or by the Archives’ digital preservation repository) for any record with an archival designation.

 

Document type: 
Learning object

Sharing records management training resources: Riding the rising tide of open educational resources (OERs) to solve our common training issue (poster)

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2016-06-14
Abstract: 

Records management is based on core knowledge that is not specific to an institution. Organizations can address knowledge gaps among their records creators by creating training materials that are openly licensed and may be freely reused, or by reusing open training tools that have been produced by others. Open educational resources or “OERs” are part of a wider open access movement in education, and may be part of the answer to how we can be more efficient, cost-effective, and strategic by creating and sharing resources. This interactive poster allows the audience to test examples of recently produced OERs.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Our paper records system at SFU (graphic)

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014-04-20
Abstract: 

Records of the university are created by records creators in departments and units, administered by records administrators (who can sometimes be the same person as the record creator) and kept in your office while the records are active. They can then move through the records system into the University Records Centre (URC) and sometimes into the Archives.

 

The graphic below breaks down where university records can be located and who is involved in their care. Note that the graphic applies to PAPER records only.

 

Document type: 
Image
Learning object

What records do I need to keep as an SFU employee? (graphic)

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2016-02-23
Abstract: 

Not all of your emails, Office files, or paper documents are university records. A good portion of them are transitory records, notes, meeting notices or copies that can be discarded as soon as you have taken action or no longer need them.

 

The graphic below breaks down what are transitory records versus what are substantive university records.

 

Substantive records need to be kept according to approved retention schedules. Transitory records, however, should be destroyed or deleted when you have no more use for them.

 

Document type: 
Image
Learning object

Naming conventions for managing digital records (audio episode 03, graphic)

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015-10-01
Abstract: 

The purpose of this podcast is to answer frequently asked questions from records creators around the university about records management.

 

This is episode three: how to name digital files.

 

Document type: 
Audio
Image
Learning object

How to read SFU's retention schedules (audio episode 02, interactive document)

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015-06-01
Abstract: 

The purpose of this podcast is to answer frequently asked questions from records creators around the university about records management.

 

This is episode two: how to read an RRSDA (or "retention schedule").

In this episode we will cover

  • what is an RRSDA
  • the alternative names for the RRSDA, and how it's useful to you
  • We will also look at each section of the RRSDA and talk about the information
  • that's presented in each section.

 

 

Document type: 
Audio
Learning object

What is a record of the university? (audio episode 01, graphic)

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015-10-01
Abstract: 

The purpose of this podcast is to answer frequently asked questions from records creators around the university about records management.

 

This is episode one: What is a record of the university?

 

In this episode we look at a simple test that can tell you if you are dealing with university records.

 

Document type: 
Audio
Image
Learning object