IPinCH Community-Based Initiatives: Final Reports

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Through collaborative partnerships with Indigenous people around the world, the IPinCH Project has supported a number of Community-Based Initatives (CBI). In our CBIs, team members worked closely with communities to investigate and address pressing cultural heritage challenges in specific contexts. We value a collaborative approach and employ Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) methods that engage the community in all aspects of the research process. The CBI final reports and project summaries were created to provide a respectful and equitable manner in which to share the knowledge created with communities, researchers, and other stakeholders as they work together to address emerging issues in cultural heritage.

Education, Protection, and Management of Ezhibiigaadek asin (Sanilac Petroglyph Site)

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Abstract: 

For the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michiganezhibiigaadek asin is a sacred place. Teachings from their Anishinabe ancestors are embedded in this rock art site that holds over 100 petroglyphs. Anishinabe cultural knowledge relates the importance of sharing aspects of these teachings. Yet concerns have arisen over what the Saginaw Chippewa consider to be inappropriate uses of the teachings, particularly in relation to commercialization of the images written on the stone. There is also concern that some of the petroglyphs are fading, and others have been vandalized. The goal of this IPinCH supported Community-Based Initative was to collaborate with the Saginaw Chippewa’s Ziibiwing Cultural Society to explore these issues, with the goal of creating a plan to protect and control the use of the ezhibiigaadek asin site.

Document type: 
Report

Treaty Relations as a Method of Resolving Intellectual Property Issues (Project Summary)

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

This IPinCH Community Initiative examines the political relationship established between First Nations and Canada through historical treaties as a possible framework within which to consider issues associated with the appropriation or the taking of some thing without the consent of the owner. More specifically, this study focuses on whether the treaty relationship included, either directly or indirectly, a shared understanding of how the cultural heritage of Indigenous peoples would be treated by Settlers and by the governments they established.

Document type: 
Report

Treaty Relations as a Method of Resolving Intellectual Property Issues (Final Report)

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

This IPinCH Community Initiative examines the political relationship established between First Nations and Canada through historical treaties as a possible framework within which to consider issues associated with the appropriation or the taking of some thing without the consent of the owner. More specifically, this study focuses on whether the treaty relationship included, either directly or indirectly, a shared understanding of how the cultural heritage of Indigenous peoples would be treated by Settlers and by the governments they established.

Document type: 
Report

Ngaut Ngaut Interpretive Project: An Interpretive Guide

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012
Abstract: 

Indigenous groups around the world are struggling to come to terms with the issues that an online environment poses to the presentation of the Indigenous past and present. In this IPinCH Community Initiative, the Mannum Aboriginal Community Association Inc. countered offensive and incorrect online information about the Ngaut Ngaut heritage complex in South Australia by creating their own interpretive content in which they shared community perceptions and values about this significant cultural landscape. The Ngaut Ngaut Interpretive Guide encourages visitors to "enjoy and respect Ngaut Ngaut...and open your minds and hearts to learn about our land, beliefs, and culture" and represents an innovative and sustainable community-based approach to cultural tourism.

Document type: 
Report

The Ngaut Ngaut Interpretive Project: Providing Culturally Sustainable Online Interpretive Content to the Public (Final Report)

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

Indigenous groups around the world are struggling to come to terms with the issues that an online environment poses to the presentation of the Indigenous past and present. In this IPinCH Community Initiative, the Mannum Aboriginal Community Association Inc. countered offensive and incorrect online information about the Ngaut Ngaut heritage complex in South Australia by creating their own interpretive content in which they shared community perceptions and values about this significant cultural landscape.

Document type: 
Report

The Journey Home- Guiding Intangible Knowledge Production in the Analysis of Ancestral Human Remains (Final Report)

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

In the Journey Home project, the question was not whether ancestral remains should be repatriated from the University of British Columbia Lab of Archaeology to the Stó:lo Nation,  but rather how to do things right, regardless of timeframe. For the Stó:lo, knowing as much as possible about these ancestors informs their process. How can scientific research address Stó:lo questions and aid this repatriation? What types of anthropological research and scientific analyses can be applied to answer community-based questions? What are the details and cultural implications of analyses — both destructive and non-destructive? Who decides which questions to ask and which means of research to implement? Who interprets the results? Who owns those data? How do ‘scientific’ and ‘cultural’ ways of knowing relate? Who is allowed to share in and benefit from this knowledge? These questions are central to the Stó:lo ’s relationship with both their ancestors and LOA. Ultimately, this IPinCH Community Initiative provides mutually acceptable guidelines for repatriation, addressing complex questions related to the production of knowledge, authority, control, and ongoing relationships with ancestors.

Document type: 
Report

Moriori Cultural Database (Project Summary)

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

The Moriori case study is located on Rēkohu (Chatham Islands, New Zealand). It focuses on the development and implementation of a multilayer research programme that ties together work on Moriori identity, indigenous cultural heritage management and protection and resource management.

Document type: 
Report

Moriori Cultural Database (Final Report)

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

The Moriori case study is located on Rēkohu (Chatham Islands, New Zealand). It focuses on the development and implementation of a multilayer research programme that ties together work on Moriori identity, indigenous cultural heritage management and protection and resource management.

Document type: 
Report

Developing Policies and Protocols for the Culturally Sensitive Intellectual Properties of the Penobscot Nation of Maine (Project Summary)

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

Introduction Indigenous communities face legal, social, cultural, and economic challenges when attempting to protect or manage their intellectual property (IP). One such challenge is the lack of a communitybased infrastructure that formalizes processes for confronting IP issues. This deficiency is particularly apparent in the field of archaeology, where IP and cultural heritage issues are being contested on a number of domestic and international front. In this IPinCH supported Community Initiative, the Penobscot Indian Nation (Maine, USA), with support from partners at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, developed tribal protocols, tools, and organizational structures to address intellectual property (IP) issues related to archaeology and heritage-based places.

Document type: 
Report

Developing Policies and Protocols for the Culturally Sensitive Intellectual Properties of the Penobscot Nation of Maine (Final Report)

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

Indigenous communities face legal, social, cultural, and economic challenges when attempting to protect or manage their intellectual property (IP). One such challenge is the lack of a communitybased infrastructure that formalizes processes for confronting IP issues. This deficiency is particularly apparent in the field of archaeology, where IP and cultural heritage issues are being contested on a number of domestic and international front. In this IPinCH supported Community Initiative, the Penobscot Indian Nation (Maine, USA), with support from partners at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, developed tribal protocols, tools, and organizational structures to address intellectual property (IP) issues related to archaeology and heritage-based places.

Document type: 
Report