Resources for Community-Based Cultural Heritage Research

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Through our work, the IPinCH Project seeks to explore the rights, values, and responsibilities of material culture, cultural knowledge, and the practice of heritage research. To further this goal, the IPinCH team has created a variety of resources for use by researchers, community members, and many other stakeholders as they grapple with emerging issues in cultural heritage ranging from cultural commodification, to responsible tourism, to safeguarding Indigenous ancestral burial grounds. Included in this collection are numerous videos, fact sheets, and other resources to address these challenges and others in collaborative and community focused research.

Using Video in Research and Documentation: Ethical and Intellectual Property Issues to Consider- Fact Sheet

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2013
Abstract: 

Video is a valuable tool for creative documentation and it can be used to facilitate information gathering, reporting, dissemination and networking. Video makes it easy to share cultural material with larger audiences. At the same time, it is important to be aware of considerations regarding the sharing of knowledge and intellectual property represented in video & film. This fact sheet offers suggestions, guidelines, and resources for using video in research and documentation.

 

Document type: 
Learning object

Cultural Heritage: What is it? Why is it important? - Fact Sheet

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

What is heritage and why is it important? In this IPinCH Fact Sheet, heritage is described as the past made present. Heritage is anything valued by people today that was also valued by previous generations. Everything from land, to language, to ecosystems, to knowledge, and culture can be considered heritage. This Fact Sheet emphasizes the importance of safeguarding cultural heritage and how this benefits people today and future generations.

 

Document type: 
Learning object

Appropriation and Commodification of Cultural Heritage: Ethical and Intellectual Property Issues to Consider- Fact Sheet

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

This fact sheet introduces the issues raised by the appropriation and commodification of cultural heritage, outlining risks and benefits and how also to avoid the pitfalls of misappropriation. While these issues are faced by all cultural groups, there is a long history of Indigenous cultural heritage being used by non-Indigenous people for commercial and other purposes.

 

Document type: 
Learning object

Ancient DNA (aDNA): What is it? Why is it important?- Fact Sheet

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

As genetic research is increasingly applied to new areas of study, including in archaeological and heritage contexts, a range of questions arise concerning the social, ethical, legal, and political implications of ancient DNA. This fact sheet explains the nature and challenges of aDNA research, and why information from it is important and relevant to people today.

 

Document type: 
Learning object

Collaborative Projects and Memoranda of Agreement (MOA)- Fact Sheet

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015
Abstract: 

All cultural heritage projects, whether they are education, research, or community-based advoaccy focused, include multiple stakeholders exchanging resources such as time and knowledge. Crafting a MOA will promote exchanges that are fair, equitable, and culturally appropriate to all parties involved, and may help reveal pontetially troublemsome or contentious areas of the future project before it even begins.

 

As this IPinCH Fact Sheet describes, a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA), or Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), is a document that describes the terms of a cooperative agreement between two or more parties, as well as the goals of the cooperation. A MOA typically makrs the beginning of a collaborative project, and is an opportunity for stakeholders to outline their visions, conduct debates, and resolve issues.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Document type: 
Learning object

Why Heritage is Not Just About Things- TEDx Yellowknife

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

On September 19-21 2014, the Tlicho Government, the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre and the Canadian Polar Commission hosted a multi-event symposium called Ilàà Kati to advance the understanding and uses of Traditional Knowledge. Dr. George Nicholas and the other presenters offered insights into the potential of traditional Aboriginal knowledge with presentations from a wide range of perspectives. The purpose of the symposium was to broaden the appreciation of TK’s relevance in contemporary society, including government and industry, furthering the reconciliation of TK and Western ways of knowing and building partnerships aimed at increasing the evidence-based application of traditional knowledge.

 

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Culture, Community, and Collaboration: New Directions for Protecting Indigenous Heritage

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2013
Abstract: 

Questions about who "owns" or has the right to benefit from Indigenous heritage are at the core of ongoing political, economic, and ethical debates taking place at local, national, and international levels. When it comes to research in this area, Indigenous peoples have typically had little say in how studies related to their heritage are managed. Increasingly though, efforts are being made to decolonize research practices by fostering more equitable relationships between researchers and Indigenous peoples, based on mutual trust and collaboration. 

 

In this presentation George Nicholas reviews debates over the "ownership" of Indigenous heritage and provides examples of new research practices that are both more ethical and more effective. These collaborative research models, in which the community leads the research, highlight important new directions in protecting Indigenous heritage.

 

Document type: 
Lecture / Talk

Decolonizing Archaeology: A Conversation with George Nicholas

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

The IRMACS Centre's series "SFU Research Masterclass" brings together a group of prominent SFU researchers tell the story of their research path and the "best practices" and tips they learned along the way - how they came to be interested in the topic, how their research directions have changed over the years, any major shifts in direction, who their collaborators are and how they developed those collaborations, etc.

 

George Nicholas is a professor of Archaeology at Simon Fraser University (SFU), in Burnaby, British Columbia. He was the founding director of SFU's Indigenous Archaeology Program in Kamloops (1991--2005), and has worked closely with the Secwepemc and other First Nations in British Columbia, and Indigenous groups elsewhere. In 2013, he received the prestigious "Partnership Award" from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council.

 

Nicholas' research focuses on Indigenous peoples and archaeology, intellectual property issues relating to archaeology, the archaeology and human ecology of wetlands, and archaeological theory, all of which he has published extensively on. His most recent book is Being and Becoming Indigenous Archaeologists, an edited volume that presents the life stories of 37 Indigenous archaeologists from around the world. He is also series co-editor of the World Archaeological Congress' Research Handbooks in Archaeology, and former editor of the Canadian Journal of Archaeology. Nicholas is the director of the Intellectual Property Issues in Cultural Heritage (IPinCH) project, a 7-year initiative funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (www.sfu.ca/ipinch).

Document type: 
Lecture / Talk

Heritage and Knowledge: Decolonizing the Research Process- The Munro Lecture

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015
Abstract: 

 

In her Munro Lecture at SFU’s Harbour Centre, Professor Linda Tuhiwai Smith shares her tremendous insights into indigenous knowledge, language revitalization, decolonizing research practices, and how to "make knowledge live.”

 

Professor Smith is an internationally recognized educator and researcher, and her book Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples has been one of the most widely cited publications relating to decolonizing research practices. She is Professor of Education and Māori Development, Pro-Vice Chancellor Māori, Dean of the School of Māori and Pacific Development and Director of Te Kotahi Research Institute, at the University of Waikato in New Zealand.

 

Document type: 
Lecture / Talk

Who Owns Native Culture...When the World Comes Knocking?- President's Dream Colloquium

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015
Abstract: 

In this talk, Ian Lilley discusses the ownership of Indigenous heritage in a global context. 

 

Ian Lilley is Professor of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies at the University of Queensland, Australia. He has worked in Australasia and Indo-Pacific archaeology and cultural heritage management for over 30 years. His research interests include migration and trade, social identity, archaeological ethics, and the role of archaeology and cultural heritage in contemporary society.

 

Document type: 
Lecture / Talk