Cultural Tourism

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The diversity of the world’s cultures, both past and present, is one of the key attractions of travel. Governments, the tourism industry, and communities work hard to create unforgettable cultural products and experiences. But are the economic benefits of these experiences shared equally with communities? Are they sustainable environmentally, are they culturally appropriate experiences to share, and do communities have control over how their culture is represented? This sub collection contains resources to assist communities, researchers, and other stakeholders to engage with the ethical and practical dimensions of cultural tourism, and to develop appropriate policies and protocols for their own unique situation.

Cultural Tourism Workshop Video

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

The Cultural Tourism Workshop, led by IPinCH Project Ethnographer, Alexis Bunten, involved participants from the Stó:lo Nation, Chehalis First Nation, Leqamel First Nation and Seabird Island. Other participants included municipal and regional tourism representatives, as well as IPinCH affiliates. The workshop was video recorded so as to share the knowledge generated during this meeting with a broader audience.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Mediating Expectations and Encounters: Community-Based Tourism Protocols- Cultural Tourism Workshop

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2013
Abstract: 

Across the world an increasing number of communities are embracing cultural tourism as a means to strengthen or build local economies, to revitalize cultural traditions, and also to complement the management of local and cultural resources. The potential for cultural tourism to build cross cultural understanding and the importance of considering the human context of tourism is explored in this presentation by Lena Mortensen (Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Toronto) and co-author Kristen Dobbin (Research Assistant for the IPinCH Cultural Tourism Working Group).

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Cultural Experience and Relationship Building in the Central Fraser Valley- Cultural Tourism Workshop

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2013
Abstract: 

Dave Schaepe is the Director and Senior Archaeologist at the Stólo Nation and the Stólo Research and Resource Management Centre and the co-chair of the IPinCH Cultural Tourism Working Group. Francine Douglas (Stólo and Tsimshian) is a Cultural Tourism and Events Coordinator with the Stólo Nation. 

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Cultural Tourism and Indigenous Agency in Southern Africa- Cultural Tourism Workshop

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2013
Abstract: 

In southern Africa, the group of traditional hunter-gatherers known collectively by outsiders as the San (or Bushmen) continue to captivate the tourist's imagination, drawing domestic and international tourists who seek authentic cultural encounters with them. At the same time, however, their cultural livelihoods are under serious threat as they remain politically, economically, and culturally marginalized throughout the region. This presentation examines the strategies that the San deploy in cultural tourism to re-articulate their identities both locally and globally.

Rachel Giraudo is an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the California State University, Northridge, and an IPinCH Associate.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Writing, Speaking and Performance: The Dialectic in the Law- Cultural Tourism Workshop

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2013
Abstract: 

IPinCH Advisor, David Stephenson (Lawyer, Rocky Mountain Law Firm), delivers a presentation titled, "Writing, Speaking and Performance: The Dialectic in the Law Between the Preservation and Protection of Cultural Heritage and it's Presentation for 21st Century Tourists".

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Indigenous Tourism Across the Pacific- Cultural Tourism Workshop

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

Alexis Bunten (Yup'ik and Aleut) is the IPinCH Project Ethnographer. This talk was presented at the Stó:lo People of the River Conference, in a session organized by the IPinCH Cultural Tourism Working Group.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

The Ngaut Ngaut Interpretive Project: Providing Culturally Sustainable Online Interpretive Content to the Public (Full Report)

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

The Ngaut Ngaut rock shelter was the first “scientifically” excavated site in Australia in 1929, but it has much deeper meanings for local Indigenous people. In conjunction with the other River Murray and Mallee Aboriginal people, the Mannum Aboriginal Community Association Inc. (MACAI) shares stewardship responsibilities with the State of South Australia for this iconic place, known as Devon Downs in the archaeological literature. Existing online information concerning Ngaut Ngaut is viewed by MACAI as incomplete or inaccurate at best, and overtly wrong and offensive at worst.

To help address these concerns, Isobelle Campbell (MACAI) and Amy Roberts (Flinders University) developed the Ngaut Ngaut Interpretive Project, an IPinCH Community Initiative. This is the final community report for the Ngaut Ngaut project

Document type: 
Report

Ngaut Ngaut: An Interpretive Guide

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2016
Abstract: 

The Ngaut Ngaut rock shelter was the first “scientifically” excavated site in Australia in 1929, but it has much deeper meanings for local Indigenous people. In conjunction with the other River Murray and Mallee Aboriginal people, the Mannum Aboriginal Community Association Inc. (MACAI) shares stewardship responsibilities with the State of South Australia for this iconic place, known as Devon Downs in the archaeological literature. Existing online information concerning Ngaut Ngaut is viewed by MACAI as incomplete or inaccurate at best, and overtly wrong and offensive at worst.

 

These concerns are addressed in an IPinCH Community-Based Initiative developed by Isobelle Campbell (MACAI) and Amy Roberts (Flinders University). This online interpretive guide was developed in a collaborative, structured, and culturally-sustainable manner and reflects both the tangible and intangible value of the Ngaut Ngaut site to local people.

 

 

Document type: 
Learning object