Intellectual Property Issues in Cultural Heritage

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Commodification of Cultural Heritage

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2016
Abstract: 

How can processes of commodification be both harmful and beneficial to people around the world? What tools and strategies can Indigenous communities and scholars use to deal with commodification concerns and opportunities? IPinCH has developed a series of resources to address complex topics such as the role of government and legislation in regulating cultural commodification, whether commodification can benefit disempowered communities, and the impact of treating human remains as commodities, whether in medical science or museums. 

Document type: 
Other

Resources for Community-Based Cultural Heritage Research

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2016
Abstract: 

Through our work, the IPinCH Project seeks to explore the rights, values, and responsibilities of material culture, cultural knowledge, and the practice of heritage research. To further this goal, the IPinCH team has created a variety of resources for use by researchers, community members, and many other stakeholders as they grapple with emerging issues in cultural heritage ranging from cultural commodification, to responsible tourism, to safeguarding Indigenous ancestral burial grounds. Included in this collection are numerous videos, fact sheets, and other resources to address these challenges and others in collaborative and community focused research. 

Document type: 
Other

IPinCH Community-Based Initiatives: Final Reports

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015-07-17
Abstract: 

Through collaborative partnerships with Indigenous people around the world, the IPinCH Project has supported a number of Community-Based Initatives (CBI). In our CBIs, team members worked closely with communities to investigate and address pressing cultural heritage challenges in specific contexts. We value a collaborative approach and employ Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) methods that engage the community in all aspects of the research process. The CBI final reports and project summaries were created to provide a respectful and equitable manner in which to share the knowledge created with communities, researchers, and other stakeholders as they work together to address emerging issues in cultural heritage. 

Document type: 
Report