First Fifty Theses

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Étude morphologique et syntaxique du français parlé par un groupe de jeunes gens a Maillardville (C.B.).

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1968
Abstract: 

None

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
G.L. Bursill-Hall
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: Department of Modern Languages
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

A phonological study of two linguistic groups in Comerio, Puerto Rico.

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1968
Abstract: 

None

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
T.W.Kim
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: Department of Modern Languages
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

School for pass-whites.

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1967
Abstract: 

The argument is pursued that the social structure of a suburban high school in South Africa can be related to the racial policy of the central government, the mores of the residents of the suburb, and the career ambitions of school teachers. Data collected, mainly by means of observer participation, in the suburb and in the school, is adduced in support of the argument. Description proceeds from the general to the particular: from a broad overview of race-relations in the suburb to a portrayal of the school as a facilitating mechanism in the process of passing for White, thence to a discussion of the effects of this involvement on the formal and informal structure of the teaching staff. The socio-economic and cultural affinity between the suburb's Whites and Coloureds permits of the emergence of cross-cutting loyalties between the two groups based on the socio-economic categories of "respectable" and "roff" rather than on colour and provides a favourable environment for pass-Whites. Passing for White is not an act essentially different from the wider process of upward social mobility as found among the Coloured people. It is not an act but a process involving anticipatory socialization and the creation of conditions of face-to-face segmentary interaction in which Whites might make ad hoc decisions which cumulatively add verisimilitude to the passer's claim to White status. Passers find in White schools one of the segmentary roles necessary for their purpose; passing is and has been for some decades endemic to many schools in South Africa. The Principal of the school on which this study focuses enrols to ? his school pass-Whites "acceptable to the community." He does so in iv response to a declining White enrolment, to pressures exerted by a relatively "colour-blind" community, and to pressures exerted by a school board which makes use of the school as a "buffer" institution. At the same time, for fear of having the school reclassified "Coloured" by the provincial educational bureaucracy, he attempts to exclude the "obviously" Coloured??n when they have White identity cards and the support of the school board. Compounding the Principal's tribulations is the disparate social-class backgrounds of teachers and pupils which provide grounds for disputes over the goals of vocational and regulatory training and the means whereby these goals are to be attained. Disciplinary problems ensue, the school's extra-curriculum withers away, and the school class?? members of which owe no allegiance to houses, clubs or socieities such as might cut across their allegiance to the class??omes the pre-eminent unit of social structure in the school. Teachers, deprived of the means par excellence of dividing and ruling their pupils (the creation and manipulation of cross-cutting allegiances) face in the class-room a solidary body of pupils united in their opposition to middle-class adult authority; this fact further compounds the school's ill-repute. Association with a pass-White and working-class school imperils the career ambitions of teachers so difficulty is experienced in attracting recruits to the teaching staff and in moderating their rate of turnover. A marked cleavage develops between transient recruits and long-term teachers. Long-term teachers, prevented for various reasons from quitting the school, experience frustration and indulge in perennial scapegoating activity. The Principal, caught between opposing pressures exerted by parents, teachers and arms of government, forfeits the V respect of his teachers and loses ground in his battle with the Vice-Principal for ascendency over the staff.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
D.G. Bettison
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: Department of Political Science, Sociology and Anthropology
Thesis type: 
(Dissertation) Ph.D.

A content analytic study of the newspaper coverage of an educational controversy at Simon Fraser University.

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1968
Abstract: 

Tho purple or lh;;. r!-.?-s i j; was i.o lU'.srribe the newspaper coverage or a particular educational issue us in;; the methodology of content analysis. Because communication is vital to all educational activities, it is essential that educators be continually increasing their knowledge of this process in order to facilitate effective learning. For nearly two weeks in March of 1967, Simon Fraser University was the setting of an educational controversy that involved the administration, faculty and students. The conflict, which was initiated by the behavior of a group of teaching assistants, generated community-wide and province-wide interest. It was the coverage of this conflict by the local press that was examined in this study. It was hypothesized that the editorial attitude toward a specific issue would affect communication in the news columns concerning that issue. The newspaper reporter was considered a gatekeeper because he controls che flow of news in a communication channel. In order to obtain a general picture of the local press coverage of Simon Fraser University, it was necessary to examine the history of the relationship between the university and the newsmen. This was achieved through a story-count analysis of articles about Sixor. Fraser which appeared during the period from July, 1963 to March, 1967, inclusive. An analysis of the gatekeeping behavior of the newspapers involved an examination of the total related content flowing through the news channel and was accomplished by utilizing various content analytic methods. These were; contingency analysis, a qualitative IV procedure that seeks Lo cxar.M-.-.c the pro'oabil: ly Chat a specified symbol will be drawn r.iven that other spec i fii'd sy~.bo"l:; are in that or related units; evaluative assertion analysis, a quantitative procedure for ".ensuring the evaluative intensity and direction ot certain concepts; direction analysis, which involved determining the evaluative direction of each paragraph.; and a display index, which provided scores on the display variables that given one item prominence over another. A questionnaire was also given to the local education editors, in order to gain information about their background and duties. \snaile the results of the background analysis and the analysis of the gatekeeping behavior seemed to support the hypothesis they did not prove anything but only suggested that the gatekeeping behavior of these particular newspapers, in this paricular case, seeir.ed to have been effected by the editorial attitude. However, several variables were discussed which may have affected the results. These included: the social organization of the newsroom; the attitudes and perceptions of the reporter; selectivity; the physical production of the newspaper; the student press; polarization of the conflict; and the responsibility of the newspaper. It was suggested that education, as a discipline, must pay more heed to the role of communication in the educational process and must be prepared to support research in this area.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Robert J.C. Harper
Department: 
Education: Department of Behavioural Science Foundations
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.Ed.

Time, death, and mutability : a study of themes in some poetry of the Renaissance - Spenser, Shakespeare, and Donne

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1968
Abstract: 

This study was undertaken in order to examine some examples of Renaissance poetry in the light of the themes of love, death, time, and mutability. The scope of the thesis has been restricted to the Mutabilitie Cantos and the Fowre Hymnes of Edmund Spenser; the Sonnets and Ovidian poems of Shakespeare; and the Songs and Sonets and Divine Poems of John Donne. The emphasis of the thesis rests on the poetry of John Donne; but to appreciate better the power of his synthesis of the sacred and profane, the author first examines the Christian idealism of Spenser and the "realism" of Shakespeare. Spenser is seen as the poet of ideals. He looks beyond the world of decay and time to a "Sabaoth of the Soul". His Hymnes. while not denying the possibility of love in time, see no way for romantic love to transcend death* Nor is earthly love of the same nature as man's love for God. Shakespeare, while recognizing the sway that Time holds over man, asserts the ability of love in friendship?and its expression in verse??triumph over change and decay. Unlike Spenser, he is not interested in ideal or eternal existences. Both poets have affinities with Donne. Like Spenser, Donne speaks in terms of eternity. Like Shakespeare, he affirms man's ability to overcome time and change in this world of mutability. His argumentative style and his synthesis of sacred and profane love set him apart. This study examines the varieties of experience found in his love poetry, culminating in his statement in such poems as The Canonization, The Anniversarie, and The Exstasie, that romantic love assumes the eternal stature of sacred love, yet never loses its attachment to physical experience. In his religious verse also love varies; man can be an inconstant lover of God f as well as of women. But always Donne stresses the continuity of experience from love of women to love of God, and the ability of both kinds of love to withstand time and change. The thesis has tried to avoid identification of life with art, the poet with the poem. Sources and antecedents have been used only where they illuminate the themes under scrutiny. Throughout the study, the ordering used for the poems is not intended to be chronological. The study is a triptych, examining the individual poets without drawing conclusions as to the superiority of one statement over another.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
F. Candelaria
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: Department of English
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

"Experiments in statement" : the theme of man's instinctual life in selected writings of H.G. Wells

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1968
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Mason Harris
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: Department of English
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

The transcendental symbol.

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1968
Abstract: 

This thesis constitutes a preliminary consideration of the artistic creative process in Romantic transcendental art, whereby chaos is transformed into cosmos. Tt deals with the disintegration of world orders and the Romantic crisis of consciousness, at the discovery of process in a world which was earlier thought to be static. In the face of a chaotic environment, a world in flux, the language of art experienced some radical transformations, both from the standpoint of what it was called upon to do in establishing order in the world, and in its organic relationship to the artist as creator. There is consideration given to the nature of the transformation of consciousness, and to the Word as a "transcendental symbol" which both makes use of and resolves the dialectical nature of process in the creative act. Consideration is given to the Word as the symbol which unites Being and becoming. For the Romantic poet to shape chaos into cosmos, it was necessary for him to discover the significance of himself both in relation to the ground of order in Being, and his place in relation to the flux of the world. Hence considerable attention is given to the creative character of the artist, and to the -IV- artist's use of his creative tools. In this context I have dealt with three figures who were 'avowed' transcendentalists - Carlyle, EmersOn, and! Thoreau - but kept ray discussion open enough so that the consideration nay also be extended to other Romantic poets. In considering these three, I have selected works where the concern for the discovery of the right relationship of nan to Divine Being and to the world of phenomena is uppermost. In each instance the central question of the activity of the Creative \ Word, the tool of creation, in bringing a True cosmos out of chaos is uppermost. In each case the artist finds that the reorient-ation of consciousness frora the world of process to a Centre in Being, brings new resources of language, a discovery of the significance of the act of creation, an appreciation of the True value of the external creation, and a restored sense of order in a dynamic universe. I deal with the work of Carlyle for the purpose of considering the rhythms of the Romantic revolution of consciousness, Emerson for the discovery of the nature of man's relationship to Divine Being, and Thoreau for his application of the creative process in the actualization of the Divine Word in forn. The central value of the thesis centers in its consideration of the root question of Romanticism, which is the discovery, in the face of external disintegration, of a Divine Centre and source of order within the human being which, through the activity of the Creative Word in the creative process, could be made flesh, so brin^inr order into the flux of the external creation.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Robert H. Dunham
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: Department of English
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

The motif of the 'quest' in the early works of W. H. Auden.

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1968
Abstract: 

None

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Robin Blaser
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: Department of English
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

An application of non-standard model theoretic methods to topological groups and infinite Galois theory.

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1968
Abstract: 

The purpose of this paper is to review some of the work done by Abraham Robinson in topological groups and infinite Galois Theory using ultrapowers as our method of obtaining non-standard models. Chapter One contains the basic logical foundations needed for the study of Non-Standard Analysis by the method of constructing ultrapowers. In Chapter Two, we look at non-standard models of topological groups and give the characterizations of some standard properties in non-standard terms. We also investigate a non-standard property that has no direct standard counterpart. In Chapter Three, we analyze an infinite field extension of a given field r and arrive at the correspondence between the subfields of our infinite field that are extensions of r and the subgroups of the corresponding Galois group through the Krull topology by non-standard methods.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
A.L. Stone
Department: 
Science: Department of Mathematics
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.Sc.

Assessment of visual discrimination in infants : comparison of a conditioning method with traditional preference methods

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1968
Abstract: 

The purpose of the present research was to develop a conditioning procedure with which to assess the visual discrimination, ability of infants, and to compare the results of this method with those obtained by traditional visual fixation preference methods. Infants twelve weeks of age were presented with black and white checkerboard stimuli varying on a physically graded dimension from 4x4- to 20x20 squares. Each stimulus was paired with a 2^x2^ checkerboard and measures of fixation time, span, and number of looks were recorded relative to each stimulus. Three groups of S_s were tested by the visual fixation preference procedures. In an effort to establish a procedure that was sensitive to the preferences of individual S_s, the stimulus presentation technique was varied among the groups. The results indicated, however, that the groups did not differ significantly with respect to the number of S_s evidencing discrimination. An operant conditioning procedure, designed to increase fixation time to one stimulus of a pair by presenting contingent visual stimulation as a reinforcer, was shown to be effective relative to a control procedure in which no reinforcement was administered. In comparison, with the visual fixation preference procedure, the experimental procedure was consistently superior in providing evidence of discrimination by individual 3_s. In comparisons with the criterion preference procedure, a modified preference procedure, the experimental procedure was usually iii superior for finding information about discrimination abilities of individual S_s. In addition, group results obtained for the preference studies indicated that infants twelve weeks of a,~'e most preferred a 10x10 checkerboard stimulus. These results were related to a theory of stimulus selection proposed by Dernber and Earl. Both zhe criterion preference procedure for groups of S_s, and the experimental procedure for individual S_s, indicated that the twelve-week-o-ld infants could discriminate the Ioxl6 from the checkerboard.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Jean Koepke
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: Department of Psychology
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.