Communication Honours Capstone Projects

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Social Media and Chinese Students at SFU: A study of social media in cultural adaptation of Chinese students in Canada

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2016-08-09
Abstract: 

This article presents a case study on the experience of cross-cultural adaptation of Chinese students at Simon Fraser University, and social media is suggested as a means to improve their experiences living around the Metro Vancouver area. In particular, this article studies reasons of the uncomfortable adaptation process of Chinese students, including mental, cultural, ideological, environmental, and educational aspects. At the same time, social media is proved to be a supportive tool in information searching and social networking, and its extension into cultural and educational aspects will also be investigated. To do this, 27 responses to an Internet-based survey and 4 interviews have been analyzed. The findings show that the majority of the respondents had unpleasant experiences for various reasons, in the meanwhile, they believe social media is a good starting point for Simon Fraser University to improve the cultural adaptation experience of new Chinese students.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
Senior supervisor: 
David Murphy
Department: 
School of Communication

EVALUATING ONLINE DELIBERATIVE ENGAGEMENTS

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015-11-11
Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
Senior supervisor: 
Murray, Catherine
Department: 
School of Communication

If You Don’t Like It Change the Channel: Radio Censorship Policies and Enforcement in Canada

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2013-07
Abstract: 

This project is an exploratory study of private radio regulation in Canada.  The Canadian Broadcast Standards Council (CBSC) is a self-regulating organization (SRO) made up of private broadcasters who create regulatory policies for radio as well as make decisions regarding consumer complaints about violations of the same policies.  Primary research consisted of twelve decisions made by the CBSC regarding complaints as well as two interviews with members of the broadcasting community.  Data were coded and analysed using the qualitative research software NVivo 10.  This research led to conclusions that indicate the CBSC has little public accountability as well as flaws within the regulation process as well as the regulations themselves. 

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
Department: 
School of Communication

Discovering the Power of Narrative: The Collective Navigation of West Indian Migration to Vancouver

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015-08-24
Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
Senior supervisor: 
Laba, Martin
Department: 
School of Communication

Video Games and the Ideology of War

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-08-09
Abstract: 

Video games have become a central part of Western popular culture, and while the academic study of the medium has progressed greatly in the past decade, analysis of games is still profoundly underdeveloped in comparison to analysis of other popular media such as film and television. Moreover, in the context of a highly mediated society characterized by volunteer-based militaries, direct experience with the reality of warfare is rare, and for the majority of citizens, war is something that is understood and engaged with primarily through the distorting lens of popular media. War is often a central theme in video games, but it is rarely examined with any substantial level of criticism. The goal of this project, therefore, is to explore the question how is ideology present in the depictions of war and political violence in video games?

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
Department: 
School of Communication

Intellectual Property Rights: An Ethical Cultural Policy for Indigenous Societies?

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2005-08
Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
Senior supervisor: 
Howard, Pat
Aginam, Arthur
Department: 
Communication

Running Out of Time at Hyperspeed

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-04-15
Abstract: 

This paper attempts to map the rise of neoliberalism - as political economic policy and related ideology- to provide the necessary context for Putnam's generational change thesis, examining the American trends, this paper explores similar changes within a Canadian context. The components of civic engagement considered here include non-voting political activity, participation in elections, and participation in community activities. Neoliberalism refers to "a theory of political economic practices proposing that human well-being can best be advanced by the maximization of entrepreneurial freedoms within an institutional framework characterized by private property rights, individual liberty, unencumbered markets and free trade" (Harvey, 2007, p.22). Inherent in this paper's mapping is the recognition that advancing the neoliberal project requires the continual increase in consumption demand, an increase which manifests through the acceleration of consumption practices and the creation of new markets (Harvey, 2010). Focusing specifically on the development of information and communication technology (ICT) markets, this paper details how this industry exploded in the mid 1970s (Dyer-Witheford, 1999) and has continued to expand since (Sciadas, 2006). 

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
Department: 
School of Communication

The Death of Democracy: How Newsprint Media Affects Voter Turnout

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2010
Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
Department: 
School of Communication

Getting Up or Selling Out? Contemporary Street Art as Public Communication and Artistic Practice

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012-03
Abstract: 

The past thirty years have seen the increasing ubiquity of a multitude of forms of urban inscription in our cities. While significant academic work has been committed to exploring graffiti in a number of ways, less attention has been paid toward the emergence of the specific practice of "street art". Focusing on the prolific UK based street artist Banksy, this paper presents a case study and discourse analysis ofBanksy's book Wall and Piece in order to explore the intersections ofart, politics, and commerce, and how they come to be configured through this emerging form of urban inscription. Principally drawing from Michel de Certeau's conceptualization around tactics, Pierre Lefebvre's idea of appropriation, and Howard Becker's characterization of the maverick artist, I suggest that the apparent contradictions between the antiestablishment themes in Banksy's work and the trajectory of his own commercially and critically successful career gesture towards a negotiated flexibility that is inherent in this emerging form ofurban artistic expression that meaningfully differentiates street art from other forms of graffiti. 

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
Department: 
School of Communication

The Process of Disclocation Amongst First and Second Generation Immigrants

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2003-08-05
Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
Senior supervisor: 
McCarron, Gary
Alexander, Bruce
Department: 
School of Communication