North American DDI (NADDI) Conference 2014

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North American Data Documentation Initiative Conference (NADDI) is an opportunity for those using DDI and those interested in learning more about it to come together and learn from each other. Patterned after the successful European DDI conference (EDDI), NADDI 2014 was a two day conference (April 1-2) with invited and contributed presentations. The conference is of interest to both researchers and data professionals in the social sciences and other disciplines. A full day of training sessions preceded the conference (March 31). One focus of this second year’s conference was on the use of DDI in “Documenting Reproducible Research” by individual research teams through the data lifecycle.

Committing to Data Quality (Keynote address)​

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014-04-14
Abstract: 

There is evidence of an increase across domains in efforts to make data openly available for reuse and reproducibility. We also see an increase in the number of institutional and domain specific repositories that provide storage and access to research data. Much of this activity is ​in​ response to requirements by funders, governments, and institutions, but is also a reflection of changing cultural norms about open science and scholarly communication. (Peer, 2014) However, openness in itself has little value unless it is "intelligent openness" (Royal Society, 2012) This means that published data should be accessible (can they be readily located?), intelligible (can they be understood?), assessable (can their source and reliability be evaluated?) and reusable (do the data have all the associated information required for reuse?) Given that a high proportion of data are being deposited without a curatorial review to check data for reuse and reproducitility, we anticipate that there will be data loss due to problems that could be resolved by committing to a data review process. That process includes examining data, documentation, and code to be sure that they meet the requirements of "independent understandability" (OAIS, 2012) for informed reuse. Given that much of the "long tail" of data won’t make it into archives that provide curation and quality review, it will fall to researchers to adequately prepare data for informed reuse as part of their standard data management strategies, ideally as part of the research workflow. We propose that if points in the lifecycle were marked as explicit moments for quality review, awareness and commitment to data quality would become more salient and best practices followed more closely and with more zeal. How does the DDI fit into this challenge? In the social sciences, there is a history of documentation that provides what is required for data to be usable and understandable, and the DDI was built upon that history. Organizations that implement the DDI are able to provide highly usable data that meet the quality criteria discussed in this talk. The DDI Lifecycle model supports the production and management of high quality data documentation and could play a significant role in: providing tools to support best practices by researchers, collecting more of the source materials produced during the research workflow that can improve understandability and reuse, and developing tools for data quality review by curators & publishers. Despite many challenges, we believe that stewardship of data in the context of “really reproducible research” demands increased attention to the challenges of independent understanding of data for informed reuse. Improving the quality of data is an investment in future data sharing, and improving the quality of the data is an obligation of any entity that assumes responsibility over the data.

References:

Peer, L. (2014) Mind the Gap: Data they share may not be data you can use. ISPS Blog. http://isps.yale.edu/news/blog/2014/03/mind-the-gap#.U1PeslwQebA Royal Society. (2012) Science as an open enterprise: open data for open science. https://royalsociety.org/policy/projects/science-public-enterprise/Report/ CCSDS. (2012) Reference Model of an Open Archival Information System (OAIS). http://public.ccsds.org/publications/archive/650x0m2.pdf Data Documentation Initiative. http://www.ddialliance.org Peer, L., Green, A. & Stephenson, E. (2014). Committing to Data Quality Review. IJDC, forthcoming. Preprint: http://isps.yale.edu/sites/default/files/files/CommitingToDataQualityReview_idcc14-PrePrint.pdf

Document type: 
Conference presentation
File(s): 

Building a Web Based Health Data Search Tool Using DDI

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014-04-14
Abstract: 

The Ontario Population Health Index of Databases (OPHID) is an index of a wide variety of quantitative information sources for and about Ontario (Canada) that reflect both the state of the health of its populations and possible explanatory variables. OPHID is a rich information resource for health researchers. The collection represents a vast improvement for the availability of metadata for health data in Ontario (and Canada as whole), where health data are often disparately collected, poorly documented, and not available or known to the public. Researchers in population health and the health sciences increasingly require high-quality health data, especially as health research becomes more evidence-based and measure-driven. This comprehensive index of health data utilizes the Data Documentation Initiative (DDI-Codebook) standard to document and describe data of varying kinds. Data sources that are of a survey, clinical, and administrative nature are described using a core set of DDI fields, with some degree of difficulty arising around consistency across the kinds of data. This presentation will provide an overview of the OPHID project goals and objectives, while focusing on the technical implementation and process by which datasets are described and marked up using the DDI standard. OPHID is a joint collaboration among the Ontario Council of University Libraries, Scholars Portal, and the Population Health Improvement Research Network (PHIRN).

Document type: 
Conference presentation
File(s): 

What’s New with DDI 3.2 and Beyond

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014-04-14
Abstract: 

The recently-released DDI Lifecycle 3.2 standard includes many fixes for problems discovered in DDI 3.1, models new content, and makes it easier for developers to build applications that use the standard. New Content: - More and better question descriptions – Data flows through survey instruments – Quality statements – Better documentation of multi-lingual text Improvements for Developers: - The simple things are simple – Improved packaging for Web Services – Elimination of schema-enforced, required content - All inline items can be referenced Moving Forward: - It’s still DDI Lifecycle, but with a more formal model behind it – Expand on the usability improvements in DDI 3.2. 

 

Document type: 
Conference presentation

An Update on Rogatus : Supporting the Survey Workflow with Open Standards and Tools

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014-04-14
Abstract: 

Rogatus is an open source questionnaire and metadata solution basing on the DDI 3.2 and SDMX standard and using the Generic Longitudinal Business Process Model (GLBPM) to specify its tool chain. Currently the project is supported by DIPF, TBA21, OPIT, IAB and GESIS and creates more and more interest especially with NSIs and data collection agencies. This presentation gives an update on new developments since NADDI 2013 including the data management portal, coding support for ISCED, improvements on the case management system, compatibility to other platforms like Colectica or MMIC plus an outlook on the mobile sampling client. Furthermore the development plan for the release version in Q1/2015 will be introduced.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Social Survey Data Collection Challenges and Trends

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014-04-14
Abstract: 

This presentation would to discuss current data collect methods and challenges and the gap between DDI 3.2 and the issues data producers are facing: • Questionnaire • 2. Coded instrument • 3. CAI Metadata • 4. Paradata

Document type: 
Conference presentation

PHDD – An RDF Vocabulary for the Physical Data Description

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014-04-14
Abstract: 

PHDD is an RDF vocabulary for the description of the physical properties of data in rectangular format including comma-separated values (CSV) or similar. It focuses purely on the physical properties of files and variables like case quantity and records per case or data type and start position. PHDD enables the publication of data as Linked Data in the Semantic Web. PHDD could be used in a standalone way (i.e., adding relevant information to CSV files) or in a more comprehensive description of data together with the possibilities of DDI-RDF Discovery (DISCO) and Data Catalog Vocabulary (DCAT) for providing a data catalog for discovery purposes. The presentation will provide an overview of the most important components of PHDD, the mapping of the properties to related elements of DDI XML Lifecycle and Codebook, and the interplay of PHDD with DISCO and DCAT. The PHDD vocabulary is currently work in progress. It is planned for publication as a specification of the DDI Alliance.

 

Document type: 
Conference presentation

New Solutions for Transnational Access and the Need for Proper Data Documentation

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014-04-14
Abstract: 

This talk will highlight current developments regarding transnational access to confidential microdata. Examples are access from North America to German labour market data and a proposal for a European Remote Access Network (Eu-RAN) that will bring researchers and research data within the European Research Area closer to each other. A new legal construct called European Research Infrastructure Consortium (ERIC) opens such solutions also for partners outside of Europe. Having better solutions for transnational access is an important step forward. At the same time none of such solutions will be successful without information about the available data. Especially when working with data from another country or even more acute when carrying out comparative research with data from multiple countries, good data documentation is needed. According to that modern transnational data access solutions will only be successful, if circumstances of access, accreditation as well as quality and content of data are documented. Such documentation needs to be easy to understand for the users and easy to implement into software tools. Only if data access and data documentation developments go hand in hand both development lines will be successful and lift transnational research on a higher level.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Neuropsychology & Aging Laboratory: Field-testing multilingual clinical assessment using DDI standards

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014-04-14
Abstract: 

The Epidemiology and Development of Alzheimer’s Disease in Urban and Rural Costa Rica research project is a longitudinal study of memory and aging harmonized with the University of Kansas’ Alzheimer Disease Center (ADC). This is the first paperless ADC based entirely in the REDCap database. The investigators developed a parallel assessment toolkit/battery in Spanish and deployed it in San Jose and Guanacaste Costa Rica. To meet the needs of Latin American colleagues, the assessment battery was migrated to Colectica and then redeveloped using QueXF, so that all data forms could be optically character recognized. The investigators will review the hurdles and plans for the next steps of development.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

On Health Research Uses of DDI

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014-04-14
Document type: 
Conference presentation

Metadata from Blaise and DDI 3.0/3.2

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014-04-14
Abstract: 

During 2013 NDDI, Gina gave a presentation on the Michigan Questionnaire Documentation System (MQDS.) In this presentation, we would discuss the process and lessons learned as we extracted the Blaise metadata into DDI codebook 2.5 formats for the harmonization and preparation of the metadata and data files. We would discuss these processes in light of the upcoming release of DDI 3.2 and version 5 of Blaise. 

Document type: 
Conference presentation