Centre for Policy Research on Science and Technology

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The Centre for Policy Research on Science and Technology (CPROST) was established in 1988 as an independent, self-supporting institute. It is linked to the School of Communication, within the Faculty of Communication, Art and Technology at Simon Fraser University. CPROST is an academic centre devoted to policy studies on science, technology, and innovation (STI). CPROST brings together practitioners and scholars to study the interaction of advances in STI, their implementation in the marketplace, and their impacts on community and individual interests.

Measuring the Return on Investment in Research in Universities: The Value of the Human Capital Produced by these Programs

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2009
Abstract: 

This research project assess the economic benefits to British Columbia of graduate students trained in research, and the economic and social returns of investment in research. It also looks at knowledge as a commodity, and the conditions of its production.

Document type: 
Report

A Brief Overview of Actor-Network Theory: Punctualization, Heterogeneous Engineering & Translation

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2009
Abstract: 

This paper argues that Actor-Network Theory (ANT) contains concepts that can be used as tools to better reveal the complexities of our sociotechnical world. To explore this, the paper puts forward an overview of ANT that draws upon those concepts that make ANT a valuable tool within the social study of technology.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Policy Environments and Institutional Factors that Shape the Role of Technology in Entrepreneurial Culture: An Exploratory Study in Mexico and Canada

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

In this paper we present a comparative study of entrepreneurship in Mexico and Canada, based on the study of the role of technology and innovation in entrepreneurial activity. The aim of the paper is to highlight similarities and differences in the perceptions of entrepreneurs about environmental and policy factors that affect their business opportunities, in order to better understand their role, and to derive policy implications that may be useful in advancing technological innovation in Mexico.

Document type: 
Conference presentation
File(s): 

Sri Lankan Expatriate Scientists in Vancouver: Attitudes Towards Returning to Sri Lanka to Rebuild

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

After a tsunami in 2004, the Sri Lankan Ministry of Science and Technology sought ways to accelerate their economic development through their burgeoning high tech industries. This paper serves as a recommendation to the Ministry to encourage Sri Lankan scientists working and studying abroad to return to the country to aid in rebuilding efforts. It accounts for the factors that lead many Sri Lankan nationals to move abroad, and provides recommendations to entice their return.

Document type: 
Report

Some Notes on Theories of Technology, Society and Innovation Systems for S&T Policy Studies

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

This paper is an examination of technological determinism – the shaping of society by technology – and the influence of society on the evolution of technology.

Document type: 
Report

A Report on the Economic Competitiveness of the District of North Vancouver

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

The District of North Vancouver entered into a process of data collection, analysis and public consultation to develop an understanding of the economic competitiveness of the District. This report addresses the importance of industrial clusters in regional economies.

Document type: 
Article

Understanding the British Columbia Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Cluster: A Case Study of Public Laboratories and Private Research

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

This study looks at the cluster using a structured approach that tests clusters against indicators of current conditions and current performance. It includes the results of an extensive interview program and survey of professionals in the field, both within the cluster and elsewhere. The results give a clear picture of a cluster that has two major components – hydrogen based industries and fuel cell technologies, which are both global in reach and potential.

Document type: 
Article

An Analysis of the Classification of Government R&D Funding

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

This paper sketches out a view on this and from it tentatively outlines a framework for the classification of government research and development. More importantly, it proposes a research strategy that could test our framework and develop the data necessary to design an R&D classification that is relevant for public sector management.

Document type: 
Article

Triple Helixes, Classification Schemes and the Knowledge Ecologies of Innovation

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

This paper suggests that a major challenge for the future is to make progress on frameworks that can incorporate the concept of knowledge ecologies as approach for organising data. It aims to clarify the nature of the problem and suggests a number of approaches that could move us towards improving the usefulness of science, technology, and research and development data.

Document type: 
Article

Australian Professional Business Services: Implications of Growth

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

It seems to be commonly assumed that the growth of the professional services industries has been grown largely as a result of outsourcing. The authors briefly explore this question using input-output data for a number of OECD countries, focusing on Australia to address the issue of changing sectoral use patterns of professional services. The implications of the findings are presented within an institutional framework that notes the historical bias against business service sectors.

Document type: 
Article