Centre for Policy Research on Science and Technology

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The Centre for Policy Research on Science and Technology (CPROST) was established in 1988 as an independent, self-supporting institute. It is linked to the School of Communication, within the Faculty of Communication, Art and Technology at Simon Fraser University. CPROST is an academic centre devoted to policy studies on science, technology, and innovation (STI). CPROST brings together practitioners and scholars to study the interaction of advances in STI, their implementation in the marketplace, and their impacts on community and individual interests.

Reconfiguring National Science and Research Systems: The Role of Charities

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2013
Abstract: 

We have become familiar and comfortable with the idea that the science, technology and innovation (STI) system of countries is constructed around the so called ‘triple helix’ of government, universities and business. Contrary to the academic interest and government policy, the public is increasingly bypassing this club to impact science funding and innovation outcomes through directly creating and donating funds for research that they want. The charities and foundations coordinating this shift are neither ignorant of strategy or dealing in petty cash. In a significant number of OECD countries, private-non-profits as the statistical category is called, fund the higher education research system at a similar or greater level than business. This result has important implications for how we understand the STI system. This paper explores this gap in the literature, ambiguities in analyzing the phenomenon and suggests a framework for further analysis how charities and foundations are reconfiguring STI systems.

 

Document type: 
Article

Explaining Sectoral Leapfrogging in Countries: Comparative Studies of the Wireless Sector

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012
Abstract: 

What explains the uneven competitiveness we find in global markets, where some firms are able to dominate? Obvious path dependency and ‘stickiness’ in markets persists, despite efforts by others with potentially greater comparative advantage. An evolutionary view of global market competitiveness provides the best answer. Timing determines fortunes. In order to take advantage of technological windows of opportunity, a co-evolutionary state-private sector partnership is required. Our study of the emergence of wireless manufacturing entrants suggests that success depends on the ability to adapt to changes in comparative advantage, markets, and technology. Globalisation therefore requires even more state intervention, albeit in more strategic ways, not less, and state intervention is at the heart of the success of national firms. The cyclical nature of global markets and technology advances offers currently unrecognised opportunities for late entrants.

 

Document type: 
Article

Alberta: Policy Inaction, Crises, Unintended Consequences and Cluster Success in the Semi-Periphery

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012
Abstract: 

The developmental state literature has typically focused attention on the role of nation-state actors. However, cities are increasingly important centres of innovation and commerce (OECD, 2006). Thus as national state policy instruments are progressively governed by international conventions (Wade, 2003), can non-national level actors influence industry development? This paper explores the role of policy in the development of Calgary's (Alberta, Canada) wireless cluster. The paper shows that while the Alberta Government was important in the early phase, it withdrew leaving the cluster struggling through recent crises. Policy suggestions that are pro-market and pro-innovation and relevant to the context are indicated.

 

Document type: 
Article

Environmental Complexity and Stakeholder Theory in Formal Research Network Evaluations

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012
Abstract: 

Governments in OECD countries are turning more and more towards creating networked entities as a means of organising cross-sector and multidisciplinary research. Yet, there is little discussion of how such networks operate and how they differ in evaluation terms from other research entities (individuals and organisations). This particularly relates to the policy objectives of networks. In this paper, we use the literature on evaluation, impact and value as a lens through which to focus on the nature and benefits of formal research networks. This paper seeks to refine our concepts of research networks and, in defining the concept of formal research networks, to map the policy issues in evaluating networks. We argue that, to do this, it is important that two extant literatures (stakeholder theory and organisational environments) be introduced into the analysis of network operations. We focus particularly on the significance of environmental complexity for network evaluation.

Document type: 
Article

A Proposal for Measuring Science, Technology and Innovation Activities

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011
Abstract: 

This conceptual framework for measuring Science, Technology and Innovation Activities (STIA) consists of five elements: (1) Human Capital, (2) Infrastructure, (3) Diffusion & Transfer, (4) Innovation, and (5) Research & Development (R&D). These components can be broken down into two categories: investment in S&T capital (human and infrastructure) and investment in innovation (R&D and national innovation activities). Diffusion and transfer of knowledge and technology is a consequence of these investments. All of these have economic and social impacts.

Document type: 
Report

The Structure and Construction of Formal Research Networks: a Policy Oriented Understanding of Stakeholder Engagement

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011
Abstract: 

ven the complexity of the modern research environment, funders (usually government agencies) are encouraging the formation of formal research networks (FRNs). FRNs have a predictable structure which includes primary and (whether acknowledged or not) secondary stakeholders as participants. Policy and program managers need to understand the larger structure, not just the internal operations, of the networks. We propose the use of actor-network theory to understand the strategy and construction of FRNs, and in particular to understand the specific problems surrounding FRNs for social science sand humanities research.

 

 

Document type: 
Report

El Empresario del Clúster del Software en Jalisco y su Capital Social

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011
Abstract: 

El objetivo de este trabajo es identificar el capital social que se construye en Jalisco en el sector estratégicos de desarrollo como es el caso del Software. Para lo cual nos apoyamos en las teorías de Coleman, Bourdieu y Putman. Ya que nos permiten identificar al empresario (Coleman), la estructura social del empresario (Bourdieu), y las redes institucionalizadas para el desarrollo del sector (Putman).

 

Document type: 
Report

Innovation, Cities and Place: an Empirical Study of the Knowledge System in Vancouver and its Place on the Pacific Rim

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011
Abstract: 

This paper examines the innovation history of a few of Vancouver’s peculiarly human capital intensive clusters noting how the isolation with no nearby cities and its connectedness (a Pacific gateway point) appear to have shaped its trajectories. This analysis begins to make a few sketches of how place and innovation can come together emerging from a 10 year study of innovation clusters and cities in Canada.

 

Document type: 
Report

Intellectual Property Policies at Canadian Universities

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2010
Abstract: 

The present study examines the Intellectual Property policies at schools selected from Research Infosource’s Canada’s Top 50 research universities 2009 (http://www.researchinfosource.com/). This work is a continuation and extension of Dr. Bruce P. Clayman’s original idea and piece University intellectual property policies.

Document type: 
Report

Capturing the Outcomes and Impacts of Publicly Funded Research

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2009
Abstract: 

Research granting agencies in Canada have increasingly turned to formal research networks (those with an organizational structure and mandate) such as NCEs and MCRIs as a mechanism to meet policy objectives such as collaboration, multi-disciplinarily and more importantly, the linking of researchers and perceived relevant stakeholder communities (industry and population groups). The project by Lewis, Holbrook and Wixted, has developed an approach to evaluate the core policy objective of networks.

Document type: 
Report