Collected Works of Heesoon Bai

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This collection contains the collected works of Professor Heesoon Bai of the SFU Faculty of Education and was made possible by the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund.

Re-searching and Re-storying the Complex and Complicated Relationship of Biophilia and Bibliophilia

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2010
Abstract: 

All of us are serious bibliophiles and biophiles. What initially drew us together to carry a sustained conversation, which has resulted in writing this paper, is a discovery that in our respective lived experiences of parenting we tried to cultivate in our children biophilia through bibliophilia, imagining that there was a direct and straightforward connect, almost a causal connection, between the two. Our parenting experience “taught” us otherwise; and now, through this collaborative conversation and writing, we are unpacking, with theoretical aids from the literature, the complex and complicated, not to mention practically challenging, biophilia-bibliophilia connection.

This paper captures a reflective exploration and collective sharing of our own life experiment, seeking to create ripples of provocation as well as resonation in the reader. Given this intent, it is fair to declare from the outset that our narrative inquiry work here does not aim to prove, disprove, or even recommend any generalizable pedagogic thesis, if indeed such research intent is possible today in a postmodernity burdened with the understanding that “[t]here can never be a final, accurate representation of what was meant or said—only different textual representations of different experiences” (Denzin, 1997, p. 5). The kind of research, such as ours, that re-searches lived experience to glean insights and further illuminate and animate personal experience is best offered, we believe, as an invitation to the reader to enter into a textual field of resonance and see how the text evokes, provokes, illuminates, and animates

Document type: 
Article

Triunal model of anxiety and its application to anxiety reduction in learning and teaching environments

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2009
Abstract: 

In this article we are calling for an interlayered and cross-dimensional approachto understanding and working with anxiety, especially as manifested in Englishas an additional language (EAL) teaching and learning environments. We aim tounderstand the phenomenon of anxiety from the multidimensional perspectives ofphysiology, psychology, and philosophy; to introduce what we call the TriunalModel of Understanding Anxiety; and based on this new understanding, tosuggest how teacher education may help teachers to notice and work with anxietyin teaching-learning environments. Given the scope of what we propose, thisarticle with its limited space affords only an initial synopsis and model-buildingexercise.

Document type: 
Article

Out beyond the ideas of wrongdoing and right doing . . .

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2008
Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

An experiment in radical pedagogy: Enactment of deep democracy in a philosopher's cafe

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

This paper introduces the idea of, and narrates an experiment in, the form of a Philosopher’s Café and the practices of Deep Democracy as radical pedagogical methodology. Philosopher’s Café’s are public forums where the practice of open dialogue is practiced, and enacts Deep Democracy. Deep democracy challenges the classical understanding of democracy as majority rule based on one vote to each citizen, which is based in the ontology of individualism and its privileging of expressions of self-interest. Interbeingness describes the interconnectedness of individuals and thereby contests the classical categorical separation of self and other. Our paper describes the process of Deep Democracy development in a Philosopher’s Café that was part of a major international conference about Existential Psychotherapies. The theses tested in this small experiment were the value and possibility of intermingling process and content, the importance of personal inner work, and the effect of process facilitation using the format of a Philosopher’s Café and the practices of Deep Democracy . This experiment supports the classroom potential for personal growth, community development, and subject matter assimilation. The inherent implications for classroom practice are outlined.

Document type: 
Article

Dao and Zen of teaching: Classroom as enlightenment field

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2008
Document type: 
Article

Suffering loves and needs company: Daoist and Zen perspectives on the counselor as companion

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

Mindful of living in a multicultural and cross-cultural society, this article introducesand presents Buddhist and Daoist philosophy, psychology, and practice along with thepotential for their application in psychotherapy within the context of the theme of thepsychotherapist or counsellor accompanying the suffering person. The theoretical grounding for this application is the understanding that the suffering person has an underlying need for ontological security. It is suggested that this is made possible by a twofold connection:intra-subjective connection to self through integration of emotions, thoughts, and psycho-physical states; and inter-subjective connection to others. A case is made in this article that the therapist’s mindful and energetic presence is key to the development of this connection.

Document type: 
Article

Philosophy for education: Cultivating human agency

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2006
Abstract: 

This paper considers the contribution of philosophy to education. First, a case is made that the fundamental goal of education is to cultivate human agency in the sense of being able to enact one’s freedom (as opposed to conditioned and habituated patterns of thinking, perception, and action) grounded in personal knowledge and ethics. This agency is named as ‘autonomy’ in this paper. Secondly, philosophy is conceived as an “art of living,” which has ancient roots in both the East and West. An argument is made that identifying philosophical activity as predominantly discursive and theoretical activity entrenches us in the “addiction” to conceptualization and blinds us to seeing that a map is not the territory. Human beings encompass the discursive as well as the non-discursive, theoretical as well as practical dimensions. Hence philosophy as an art of living must address all the dimensions. As an illustration, a number of exemplary philosophic arts pertaining to these practices are explored, including world-making through dialogue (Socratic); autobiographical experiment through philosophical writing (Nietzschean); human-making and self-transformation (Confucian); and mindfulness practice (Buddhist). The case is made that these practices combine to illustrate and demonstrate that philosophy is a practice devoted to the cultivation of fundamental human agency, namely autonomy.

Document type: 
Article

The three I’s for ethics as an everyday activity: Integration, intrinsic valuing, and intersubjectivity

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2004
Abstract: 

In addressing the theme of ethics as an everyday activity. this essay makes acase for the primacy of preventive ethics over interventional ethics.Preventive ethics aims at creating a condition of viability and wellbeing forall members of the earth community. an ethical ideal that follows from thethesis that alllife~phenomena are interconnected and interpenetrating. Bysharp contrast, interventional ethics .functions to redress the alreadyaccrued harm and damage that results from not paying attention, on aneveryday basis, to the community members' bio~social~psychic conditions ofwellbeing. This essay suggests three interlinked practices for preventiveethics. First, we must integrate the mind/body, self/other, and subject/object.Second, we must learn to value the world intrinsically, as we do in aestheticappreciation. Third, we must cultivate the art of intersubjectivity in order tocounter the prevailing habit of objectifying the other.

The stop: The practice of reanimating the universe within and without

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2003
Document type: 
Article

Learning from Zen arts: A lesson in intrinsic valuation

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2003
Abstract: 

In this essay, I shall make the argument that, although the arts have been the victim of economism and instrumentalism, their power is such that, if only we could truly tap into it, arts can become our healing medicine.  But, for the arts to become such medicine, they have to be understood and undertaken in a better light than they conventionally have been in our culture. The conventional understanding equates arts with the domain of the beautiful.  This view stems from Western intellectual and artistic traditions, wherein the beautiful and the good are considered two not only distinct but separate qualities and values. Thus, aesthetics has been the pursuit of the beautiful, while ethics is the pursuit of the good.  But if we go to Zen or Taoist thought, we encounter a different tradition of intellectual discourse and life practices wherein aesthetics and ethics merge and become two aspects of the same radical (in the sene of the root) human experience, techincally called the 'nonduality' in Buddhist literature.  As I shall show, in this radical experience of nonduality lies the key to the resistance against economism and instrumentalism. In nonduality "the preservation of the world," to borrow Thoreau's phrase, lies. Thus, the arts are essential and critical to the planetary survival. Nothing can be further from truth and close to absurdity than the notion that the arts are a luxury item and have primarily recreational and ornamental values.         

Document type: 
Article