Collected Works of Heesoon Bai

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This collection contains the collected works of Professor Heesoon Bai of the SFU Faculty of Education and was made possible by the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund.

Holistic-contemplative pedagogy for 21st century teacher education: Education as healing

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2018
Abstract: 

Holism has to do with the state of being whole. ‘Whole’ is derived from Old English word, hal, meaning, whole in the sense of uninjured, intact, safe, and healthy.  This etymology takes us straight into the heart of the matter concerning holistic education: we of current civilization urgently need holistic pedagogy today in response to the hurt and damage that is experienced everywhere on this planet, to the point of threatening the very viability of sentient existence. A holistic paradigm of education including teacher education is for healing.

Document type: 
Book chapter

Science education in the key of gentle empiricism

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2017
Abstract: 

Let’s begin this thinking about science education at the beginning: with the very meaning of science education. Science education may mean instructing in or learning about scientific information, knowledge, and methods in various disciplines. The goal here would be to equip our students with requisite knowledge and skills to become scientists, technicians, and science and technology educators. Our current system of science education is replete with this way of teaching science. And we need this form of education to cultivate future generations of scientists, technicians, and workers in science-related careers.

Document type: 
Book chapter

Ancient and medieval sources of therapy

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2016
Abstract: 

This entry discusses the precursors to contemporary therapies. It is very helpful for therapists to have knowledge of the roots of their profession. Since the earliest times humans, being social creatures, have been sitting together, discussing matters of suffering along the continuum of birth, life, and death. Such dialogic practices, later dubbed, ‘talking cures,’ and what is now called ‘therapy,’ had the intent of alleviating human suffering.

Document type: 
Book chapter
File(s): 

Unleashing the elephant out of the closet and into the wildness of inner work

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2020
Abstract: 

In this chapter, the authors explore the “hidden curriculum” that is enacted
when the teaching-self transmits to the learning-self, the being aspects of the
teacher. It is proposed that these aspects are communicated through discursive
and nondiscursive materials. The latter includes energetic, emotional, and
gestural “languages.” An argument is made that the current, modernist conceptions
and practices of education that predominantly focus on covering and
downloading curriculum materials do not create openings for exploring the
being aspects of teachers and learners. Moreover, acknowledging Avraham
Cohen’s thesis, “We teach who we are, and that’s the problem,” the authors
explore the hurtful and damaging influence of the teachers’ “Shadow materials.”
An argument is made for the moral imperative of teachers’ (or anyone
who is in a position of influencing others) self-study to minimize or prevent
hurtful and damaging influences that could have a long-lasting impact on the
students’ or learners’ self-formation. The authors propose the method of inner
work, integrated with contemplative inquiry and practices, as a way for educators
to work with the materials of consciousness. Inner work largely involves
working through psychological projections, introjections, and entanglements
that permeate one’s inner world. Some details of inner work are offered,
including how to facilitate a dialogue between the parts or subselves in one’s
inner world that are in tension and conflict. It has been further proposed that this kind of inner work would lay the necessary foundation for becomingkinder, caring, and more compassionate human beings.

Document type: 
Book chapter

A critical reflection on environmental education during the COVID-19 pandemic

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2020
Abstract: 

This paper problematizes the current conception and purview of environmental education (EE), seeing it as part and parcel of the modernist western worldview that normalizes and valourizes human domination and exploitation of nature in the name of progress. Using the COVID-19 pandemic as a lens through which to examine and expose the modernist western blueprint of EE, this paper suggests another way of reconsidering EE: the Zen way of ‘becoming one with ten thousand things.’ Paradoxically, the Zen way, to be true to itself, must transcend itself, and this paper invites the reader to see environmental education in the same light. To go further than just arguing for a Zen inspired EE, this paper includes a section that offers three practices for the reader to try.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Contemplating philosophy of education: A Canadian west coast perspective

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2020
Abstract: 

Starting with an assertion that philosophy’s prerogative is to propose alternative worldviews and values, in addition to the basic interpretation of philosophy as an inquiry into the myriad dimensions of human experience, this paper proffers a view of education that centers the cultivation of a more balanced and integrated humanity in resistance to the increasing instrumental forces in modern societies that fragment, alienate, and therefore dehumanize. Distinguishing between education (primarily concerned with the human being) and instruction (primarily concerned with the human having), this paper is primarily concerned with education, and it proposes a contemplative mode of intersubjective relationality between the self and self-other. A variety of critical observational and interpretive notes are offered on major concepts that animate contemporary discourses in education, such as dualisms, imbalance and fragmentation, dislocation and alienation, progress, and existential crisis, all refracted through the prism of the most recent contemplative turn in education. The chapter ends with a curated dialogue among the four authors of this chapter, all of whom share how they have come to situate themselves in the intersection of philosophy of education and contemplative inquiry and how they see the nature of contribution that the latter makes to the former.

Document type: 
Book chapter
File(s): 

From fear and hostility to awakening and hospitality: Learning to encounter the strange with an open heart

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2020
Abstract: 

The strange is no stranger to us.  It lies within the bosom of each of us. The strange is found in the heartbeat of every one of us: “. . .[we] are always already everywhere inhabited by the Other in the context of the fully real“ (Smith, 2006, p. xxiv). The strange is that which has been denied in us, and becomes the shadow material (Hollis, 2007), to use the Jungian terminology.  If, for example, a young boy is strictly told not to cry when he is sad and hurting because--his father insists--he will grow up to be a ‘sissy’, the soft and the sensitive in him could become a stranger to him in his inner world, and also he may see others who are soft and sensitive to be sissies and despise them.  Not understanding this psychological construction of the strange can have horrific consequences, as human history amply attests: seeing others as savage, subhuman, vermin, criminal, evil, and the like.  Ryszard Kapuścińsk (2006), the great Polish writer whose lifetime travels to foreign cultures and meditations upon Otherness are well-known to us through his journalism, observes: “Conquer, colonise, master, make dependent – this reaction to Others recurs constantly throughout the history of the world” (p. 23). Our present paper focuses on understanding the psychological construction of the Other, and seeks ways to deconstruct this construction, not just theoretically but through practices of embodiment.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Becoming an ecological self through contemplative ways: A response to James R. Bigari

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2017
Abstract: 

I agree with R. S. Peters’ conception of education, which centralizes
developing awareness as an important and essential aim of education. Indeed,
awareness has to be the foundation of educational aims, to the extent that
humans are beings of consciousness whose perceptions and actions are deeply
influenced and shaped by conditions of awareness.1 “Having” knowledge,
information, and skills cannot replace operating conditions of awareness. If
my awareness “shrinks” in reaction to fear or panic, my surrounding world
“shrinks” too, compromising my ability to see what’s in front of me and from
accessing knowledge stored in my memory. Certainly, repeated tendencies and
habits of dimming awareness profoundly shape a person’s epistemic, ontic, and
axiological relationship to the world.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Towards enlightenment: Buddhism's contribution to the common good through establishing contemplative culture

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2018
Abstract: 

In this paper, a case is made that Buddhism is a system of education that is designed to transition humanity from egoic consciousness to post-egoic consciousness, which is also known as enlightenment. It is further argued that global world peace cannot be had if such transition is not made. Toward this transition, Buddhism is seen as making an essential contribution by providing us with contemplative methodology for the shift in consciousness. Meditational technologies, such as insight meditation and working with the Four Immeasurables, are introduced and shown how they support the transition.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Holistic-contemplative pedgagogy for twenty-first century teacher education as healing

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2018-09-14
Abstract: 

This chapter centralizes the thesis that lack of holism in the way we live our lives manifests as imbalance, wounding, and brokenness in all members of the planet earth. Hence, we propose that healing should be an important aim of education in response to the damage that is experienced everywhere today on this planet. We look to contemplative inquiry as a way of integrating the healing methodology into holistic education. We then critically examine contemplative education itself and some of its contemporary challenges, and advocate for a comprehensive approach that recognizes the importance of psychological inner work that addresses the deep wounding, along with the healing work in intersubjectivity. The chapter concludes with suggestions for the inclusion of contemplative inquiry in teacher education, and highlights how artistic practices can serve as an effective means of recovering holism in contemplative inquiry.

Document type: 
Article
File(s):