Collected Works of Heesoon Bai

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This collection contains the collected works of Professor Heesoon Bai of the SFU Faculty of Education and was made possible by the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund.

Breathing Qi, Following Dao: Transforming this Violence-Ridden World

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2007
Document type: 
Book chapter

Zen and the Art of Intrinsic Perception: A Case of Haiku

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2002
Document type: 
Article

Peace with the Earth: Animism and Contemplative ways

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2013
Abstract: 

In this paper I problematize the modern everyday ontology that categorically separates the animate from the inanimate, showing that such separation has ethical implications that are environmentally devastating. I propose a turn to an animistic ontology and epistemology. Acknowledging the challenge of such turn, I suggest contemplative practices as a way to aid this turn. I engage a variety of literature and resources from Daoism, Buddhism, Appelbaum’s work, neuroscientific findings to support my exploration of the connection between animistic perception and contemplative ways.

Document type: 
Article

Learning from Hermit Crabs, Mycelia and Banyan: Education, Ethics, and Ecology

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2013
Document type: 
Book chapter

Reclaiming our Moral Agency through Healing: A Call to Moral, Social, Environmental Activists

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012
Abstract: 

This paper makes the case that environmental education needs to be taken up as a moral educa- tion to the extent that we see the connection between harm and destruction in the environment and harm and destruction within human individuals and their relationship, and proceeds to show this connection by introducing the key notion of human alienation and its psychological factors of wounding, dissociation or split, self and other oppression and exploitation, all of which result in compromised moral agency. To this end, the paper further makes the case that we need to replace the culture of alienation with a culture of healing and reclamation of fundamental humanity manifest as compassion and wisdom, and presents an ideal of moral agency that would emerge when all parts and dimensions of one’s being——body–mind–heart– energetics——are aligned, attuned and integrated, having healed from the body–mind split, mind–heart split, body–spirit split and mind–matter split. Concepts and imagery borrowed from Asian philosophies, such as Buddhism and Daoism, are offered as illustrative resources for the project of reclaiming uncompromised moral agency and its manifestation through compassion and wisdom. These concepts include hungry ghosts, bodhicitta, sunyata and wu-wei.

Document type: 
Article

Levinas and responsibility

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

In contrast to the prevailing modernist conception of ethics, wherein responsibility toward others is seen as the necessary cost one has to bear in exchange for the right to pursue individual self-interest, Levinas calls into question the claim to a natural drive toward self-interest and individual freedom. He argues instead that our basic condition, or “ethical nature,” is a commitment to the rights of the other person. However, in order to understand Levinas’s inversion of the traditional model, it is important to understand the backdrop against which it stands. In this chapter, we begin by unpacking the traditional Western view of rights and responsibility, drawing especially on the social contract theories of Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau. We then discuss Levinas’s approach to rights and responsibility, and, finally, we explore the implications of such a conception for moral education.

Document type: 
Book chapter

What is Inquiry?

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2005
Document type: 
Book chapter

Exploring Deweyian Experiential Learning Pedagogy as Citizenship Development

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011
Abstract: 

Developing good citizens is one of the root theoretical justifications and purposes of public schooling and social studies. Much discussion exists, however, over what good citizenship entails and how it can best be achieved. One approach — experiential learning and its associated service learning—is currently popular in a number of disciplines. It is argued to be aninvaluable way of developing students’ citizenship through experience basedlearning. This paper begins by reviewing Dewey’s educational theory, whichencompasses experiential learning with the aim of developing citizenship, thussetting the foundations for current experiential and service learning pedagogies. It then presents the findings of a qualitative interview study with high schoolstudents and teachers who have taken part in overseas service projects. Thediscussion illustrates the benefits and challenges of citizenship developmentthrough experiential curricula and concludes with recommendations that aim to strengthen this form of learning.

Document type: 
Article

Emotional intelligence meets virtue ethics: Implications for educators

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011
Abstract: 

The notion that there is more than one kind of intelligence for human beings, and that social and emotional intelligence (EI) is just as critical as cognitive intelligence for success in the world is by now fairly well received and well-established in North American educational contexts.  But the more we—the authors of this article—are impressed by the magnitude of salutary influence that the EI work spreads in diverse educational domains, the more we see its limitations as an educational project that can actually and practically augment people’s EI and ethics.

 

We have chosen to consider EI in this article not only because of its far-reaching influence in the field of education as above mentioned but also because of the claim that it was inspired by Aristotle’s virtue ethics (Goleman, 1995) and its association with ethical development.  Our own research and practice interest has been fostering ethical development in people via virtue ethics, and if EI is, as Goleman et al. (2002) claimed, such a singularly important ingredient, we investigate their conceptualization of EI and consider the possibility of further developing and fortifying it. Given the acceptance of EI, its claimed value and roots in virtue ethics has prompted us to research the limitations of the EI work by Goleman et al. (2002), and to search for works that would address these limitations. We are particularly concerned about the educator’s EI impacting students’ learning and emotional intelligence, a concern also identified by others (Jennings & Greenberg, 2009). Our paper advances the thesis that the cultivation of educators’ EI requires the practice of virtue ethics and we present our work on the marriage of EI and virtue ethics as a challenge to the conventional and hegemonic conception and practice of education that marginalizes the education of the heart.

Document type: 
Article

Exceptional educators: Investigating Dimensions of their practice.

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2010
Abstract: 

A view is proposed that being a skillful educator requires more than consummate knowledge of subject matter, good pedagogical technique, and even an ability to form good relationships with students. The position taken is that central to becoming a truly gifted educator is an integrated process of achieving accomplishment and skill as a human being with self-awareness, the ability to do personal inner-work, relationalabilities, and ability to facilitate the group and community development dimensions of a classroom. The ineffable aspect of such educators is that they readily engage students in existing circumstances both personally and pedagogically. Ideas are offered to further investigation into the development and nurturance of such educators.

Document type: 
Article