Collected Works of Heesoon Bai

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This collection contains the collected works of Professor Heesoon Bai of the SFU Faculty of Education and was made possible by the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund.

Zen and the Art of Storytelling

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

This paper explores the contribution of Zen storytelling to moral education. First, an understanding of Zen practice, what it is and how it is achieved, is established. Second, the connection between Zen practice and ethics is shown in terms of the former’s ability to cultivate moral emotions and actions. It is shown that Zen practice works at the roots of consciousness where, according to the fundamental tenets of Buddhism, the possibility of human goodness, known as bodhicitta (awakened heartmind), lies. Third, it is suggested that storytelling is a viable and desirable means of moral education. Two examples of Zen stories are introduced, and interpretive commentaries are offered in the service of illustrating the major points made in this article. 

Document type: 
Article

The Circle of Leadership Integrity Within Business Organizations

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2013
Document type: 
Book chapter

Re-visioning Higher Education: The Three-Fold Relationality Framework

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2013
Document type: 
Book chapter

Minding What really Matters: Relationship as Teacher

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012
Document type: 
Book chapter

Breathing Qi, Following Dao: Transforming this Violence-Ridden World

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2007
Document type: 
Book chapter

Zen and the Art of Intrinsic Perception: A Case of Haiku

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2002
Document type: 
Article

Peace with the Earth: Animism and Contemplative ways

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2013
Abstract: 

In this paper I problematize the modern everyday ontology that categorically separates the animate from the inanimate, showing that such separation has ethical implications that are environmentally devastating. I propose a turn to an animistic ontology and epistemology. Acknowledging the challenge of such turn, I suggest contemplative practices as a way to aid this turn. I engage a variety of literature and resources from Daoism, Buddhism, Appelbaum’s work, neuroscientific findings to support my exploration of the connection between animistic perception and contemplative ways.

Document type: 
Article

Learning from Hermit Crabs, Mycelia and Banyan: Education, Ethics, and Ecology

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2013
Document type: 
Book chapter

Reclaiming our Moral Agency through Healing: A Call to Moral, Social, Environmental Activists

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012
Abstract: 

This paper makes the case that environmental education needs to be taken up as a moral educa- tion to the extent that we see the connection between harm and destruction in the environment and harm and destruction within human individuals and their relationship, and proceeds to show this connection by introducing the key notion of human alienation and its psychological factors of wounding, dissociation or split, self and other oppression and exploitation, all of which result in compromised moral agency. To this end, the paper further makes the case that we need to replace the culture of alienation with a culture of healing and reclamation of fundamental humanity manifest as compassion and wisdom, and presents an ideal of moral agency that would emerge when all parts and dimensions of one’s being——body–mind–heart– energetics——are aligned, attuned and integrated, having healed from the body–mind split, mind–heart split, body–spirit split and mind–matter split. Concepts and imagery borrowed from Asian philosophies, such as Buddhism and Daoism, are offered as illustrative resources for the project of reclaiming uncompromised moral agency and its manifestation through compassion and wisdom. These concepts include hungry ghosts, bodhicitta, sunyata and wu-wei.

Document type: 
Article

Levinas and responsibility

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

In contrast to the prevailing modernist conception of ethics, wherein responsibility toward others is seen as the necessary cost one has to bear in exchange for the right to pursue individual self-interest, Levinas calls into question the claim to a natural drive toward self-interest and individual freedom. He argues instead that our basic condition, or “ethical nature,” is a commitment to the rights of the other person. However, in order to understand Levinas’s inversion of the traditional model, it is important to understand the backdrop against which it stands. In this chapter, we begin by unpacking the traditional Western view of rights and responsibility, drawing especially on the social contract theories of Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau. We then discuss Levinas’s approach to rights and responsibility, and, finally, we explore the implications of such a conception for moral education.

Document type: 
Book chapter