Collected Works of Heesoon Bai

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This collection contains the collected works of Professor Heesoon Bai of the SFU Faculty of Education and was made possible by the SFU Library's Scholarly Digitization Fund.

Writing Witness Consciousness

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015
Document type: 
Book chapter

Life lessons

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Document type: 
Book chapter

The Self-Cultivation Model of Lifelong Learning: Toward Post-Egoic Development

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

This chapter takes the prevailing anti-aging sentiment and cultural practice as the starting point of a critical analysis and shows that the modernist worldview of materialistic individualism is at their foundation. Exposing and critiquing the limiting deficit understanding of human aging and human development in this worldview, the authors propose a developmental model that moves beyond materialistic individualism and egoic development and sees human beings becoming progressively integrated into larger and larger circles of being that include not only human others but also non-human others such as Nature and Cosmos. This wider and holistic vision of human development is influenced by classical Asian philosophies that posit post-egoic notions of human being. Using biographical materials to identify the themes relevant to post-egoic development, the authors sketch a model of lifelong learning and growth with what they see as essential elements of such growth: secure bonding and connection, nurturance and nourishing, spirituality, self-cultivation and inner work, community development, virtue cultivation, healing, meditation, and contemplative practices.

Document type: 
Book chapter

Relationship as teacher of sustainability: Post-individualist education

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

In the face of destructive human presence, sustainability has become a prominent and central theme of the contemporary environmental and wellbeing discourse. Our chapter takes the current environmental and sociopolitical challenges humanity faces as our species’ developmental issue precipitated by the bonding rupture between human beings and other beings. We propose that the sustainability discourse be taken in the direction of healing the wounds of bonding rupture and facilitating the evolution of human consciousness and development of a more mature identity. We posit that the latter is concomitant with overcoming materialistic individualism and moving towards the relational integration of self, community, and world. We make the case that these relational practices are intrinsic to evolving and developing sustainable humanity. In particular, this chapter shows, by way of narrative illustrations, how we may create teaching and learning environments in schools and other institutions that are conducive to experiencing and internalizing a relational sense of self.

Document type: 
Book chapter

Intercultural philosophy and the nondual wisdom of ‘basic goodness’: Implications for contemplative and transformative education

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015
Abstract: 

Radical personal and systemic social transformation is urgently needed to address world-wide violence and inequality, pervasive moral confusion and corruption, and the rapid, unprecedented global destruction of our environment. Recent years have seen an embrace of intersubjectivity within discourse on educational transformation within academia and the public sphere. As well, there has been a turn toward contemplative education initiatives within North American schools, colleges and universities. This article contends that these turns might benefit from openness to the ontologies, epistemologies, and ethics of the ‘wisdom traditions’ from which many contemplative practices are drawn. To illustrate this point, we discuss the value of intercultural philosophy of education, and introduce Eastern philosophical ideas, specifically, the Shambhala Buddhist notion of the nondual ground and wisdom of basic goodness and related teachings. We detail how awareness of basic goodness and its holistic expression in the groundpath, and fruition of Shambhala teachings can open vital questions regarding intersubjectivity, challenge and reinvigorate aspects of current engagements with contemplative practices, and provide significant insights and educational paths for transformational endeavours in neoliberal times. Informed by our learning from Shambhala, we conclude with a deepened understanding of intercultural philosophy of education.

Document type: 
Article

Towards Intercultural Philosophy of Education

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

In this paper, we propose an understanding of philosophy of education as cultural and intercultural work and philosophers of education as cultural and intercultural workers. In our view, the discipline of philosophy of education in North America is currently suffering from measures of insularity and singularity. It is vital that we justly and respectfully engage with and expand our knowledge and understanding of sets of conceptual and life-practice resources, and honor and learn from diverse histories, cultures, and traditions. Such honoring provides responsive conditions for our coming together in and across differences in order that we may productively and creatively address and overturn grammars of violence, destruction, and dis-ease in these complexly troubled times. Committing ourselves to deconstructing historical and contemporary beliefs, values, and practices that are compromising human and planetary flourishing, we undertake responsibilities to go cross-cultural and intercultural.

Document type: 
Article

Zen and the Art of Storytelling

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

This paper explores the contribution of Zen storytelling to moral education. First, an understanding of Zen practice, what it is and how it is achieved, is established. Second, the connection between Zen practice and ethics is shown in terms of the former’s ability to cultivate moral emotions and actions. It is shown that Zen practice works at the roots of consciousness where, according to the fundamental tenets of Buddhism, the possibility of human goodness, known as bodhicitta (awakened heartmind), lies. Third, it is suggested that storytelling is a viable and desirable means of moral education. Two examples of Zen stories are introduced, and interpretive commentaries are offered in the service of illustrating the major points made in this article. 

Document type: 
Article

The Circle of Leadership Integrity Within Business Organizations

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2013
Document type: 
Book chapter

Re-visioning Higher Education: The Three-Fold Relationality Framework

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2013
Document type: 
Book chapter

Minding What really Matters: Relationship as Teacher

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012
Document type: 
Book chapter