Ecological Restoration Post Project Appraisals of Stoney Creek, Burnaby, British Columbia

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This is a collection of post project appraisal reports on the the ecological restoration projects undertaken on Stoney Creek, Burnaby, BC. These studies were conducted, and subsequent reports written, by students in SFU's School of Resource and Environmental Management.

Assessment of Past and Present Sediment Quality of Stoney Creek in Burnaby, British Columbia

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2013-04
Abstract: 

In analyzing the sediment and water quality of the Stoney Creek habitat, four key aspects were investigated: lithology, sediment/water quality, salmon spawning/incubation, and particle size distribution. The lithology found the streambed sediment layer is 3 cm in depth (over bedrock) and consists mainly of sand and some coarser material including gravels, cobbles, and boulders. The sediment of the offchannel pond is mainly mud (fine material) with a moderate amount of sand and a very small percentage of coarser material including gravels and organic matter (leaf detritus and woody debris). Chemical analysis concluded a significant concentration of iron in the pond environment, with potential for adverse effects to salmon offspring. This report further aims to assess the influences of fine sediment on the quality of salmon spawning habitat and incubation success rate. Permeability of spawning gravels and dissolved oxygen concentrations are measured to see if they support the incubation and growth of salmon eggs. Particle size distributions are found significantly different between upstream pool and pond side. And the difference of particle size distributions can influence salmon production in the off-channel site.

Document type: 
Report
File(s): 

An Assessment of the Restoration of Shade in the Stoney Creek Habitat Improvement Project

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2013-04
Abstract: 

 The Stoney Creek restoration project was expected to have a large impact on the surrounding riparian vegetation. Canopy shade is an important factor affecting salmonids through regulation of water temperature. In seven restored and three unrestored sites, fish-eye photography was used to measure canopy openness as an indirect measurement of shade, and to determine if this was similar between restored and unrestored areas. There were several limitations of this analysis, however, including the fact that deciduous trees did not have all their foliage at the time of year this project was conducted. A clinometer was used to measure the heights of the tallest trees surrounding the sites to see which sites would have more cover from the sun. There were several limitations with the clinometer use, as well, including the weather. Several of the restored sites had similar levels of canopy openness as unrestored sites, but several had lower levels. Tree heights were found to be fairly similar across all sites. We conclude that it appears as though several sites were not sufficiently restored to their pre-restoration project levels, which may be due to an insufficient amount of growing time since replanting occurred, and this may have important impacts on salmonids.

Document type: 
Report
File(s): 

An Assessment of Stream Health Through Use of Macroinvertebrates as Bio-­‐Indicators

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2013-04-22
Abstract: 

The Stoney Creek Off--‐Channel Habitat Improvement Project aimed to restore a stream section in Burnaby, BC. The species assemblages of macroinvertebrate bioindicators were analyzed with reference to stream health of the restored ecosystem. Using a region specific B-IBI, species assemblages were characterized according to their tolerance to pollution. Samples where collected from a previously restored upstream site and recently restored downstream site and individually from riffle and pool zones within each site. Frequency distributions and relative abundances were used to measure actual and relative representation of categories. Overall, pollution tolerant species showed the highest representation over both sites when compared to pollution intolerant and somewhat tolerant species. Riffles exhibited a higher presence of pollution intolerant species then pools. These results indicate relatively low stream quality. Results of the WQI did not support the stream quality data provided by macroinvertebrates. Further study needs to be undertaken to involve baseline data and address additional determinants for species assemblages.

Document type: 
Report
File(s):