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Examining Eating: Bridging the Gap Between ‘Lab Eating’ and ‘Free-Living Eating’

File(s): 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2022-04-15
Abstract: 

Food consumption and its physiological, psychological, and social antecedents and outcomes have received considerable attention in research across many disciplines, including consumer research. Although researchers use various methods to examine food decision-making, many insights generated stem from observing eating choices in tightly controlled lab settings. Although much insight can be gained through such studies (or “lab eating”), it is apparent that many factors differ between such settings and everyday consumption (or “free-living eating”). This article highlights key differences between “lab eating” and “free-living eating,” discusses ways in which such differences matter, and provides recommendations for researchers regarding how and when to narrow the gap between them, including by enriching lab studies in ways inspired by free-living eating. Besides suggesting how researchers can conduct studies offering a deeper understanding of eating patterns, we also highlight practical implications for improving food consumption for consumers, marketers, and policymakers.

Document type: 
Article

Confronting Indifference Toward Truth: Dealing with Workplace Bullshit

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2020-02-07
Abstract: 

Many organizations are drowning in a flood of corporate bullshit, and this is particularly true of organizations in trouble, whose managers tend to make up stuff on the fly and with little regard for future consequences. Bullshitting and lying are not synonymous. While the liar knows the truth and wittingly bends it to suit their purpose, the bullshitter simply does not care about the truth. Managers can actually do something about organizational bullshit, and this Executive Digest provides a sequential framework that enables them to do so. They can comprehend it, they can recognize it for what it is, they can act against it, and they can take steps to prevent it from happening in the future. While it is unlikely that any organization will ever be able to rid itself of bullshit entirely, this article argues that by taking these steps, astute managers can work toward stemming its flood.

Document type: 
Article

Fleeting, But Not Forgotten: Ephemerality as a Means to Increase Recall of Advertising

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-08-27
Abstract: 

Ephemeral social media is growing in popularity and brands are increasingly using this method to engage with and advertise to consumers. Yet, little research attention has been paid to how consumers perceive and retain social media content, particularly marketing communications, when they are aware it will disappear. Across five studies we find that when viewers know content is ephemeral, their recall of the content is heightened compared to when they believe the content will be accessible later. We find that this increase in recall due to ephemerality is mediated by processing effort, such that when consumers believe content will disappear, they expend more effort processing the content than if the content is believed to be accessible again. Relevant to advertisers, we find this effect spills over to advertising embedded within ephemeral social media content. Our findings represent a novel means of increasing advertising recall, qualify past findings and theory, and suggest an important new stream of research. 

Document type: 
Article

Above the Scam: Moral Elevation Reduces Gullibility

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-06-09
Abstract: 

Consumers are increasingly exposed to scams and questionable marketing practices. The current work examines how consumers’ emotional states influence their gullibility (a belief or compliance with a request that most people would consider naïve). Across four studies, we show that the emotional experience of moral elevation reduces susceptibility to believe dubious claims or comply with suspicious requests. While past research showed that moral elevation enhances nurturance behavior (and support of a requester), the current work suggests that elevation may also play a protective function (that is, reduce gullibility). We show that decreased trust in a persuasion agent mediates the influence of elevation on gullibility, and demonstrate this effect in the context of health and financial domains.

Document type: 
Article

Ethical Branding in a Divided World: How Political Orientation Motivates Reactions to Marketplace Transgressions

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-09-12
Abstract: 

In today's marketplace, users (e.g., purchasers, influencers) are increasingly the "face" of brands to potential consumers, increasing the risk for brands should these users act poorly. Across seven studies, we document that political orientation moderates the desire for punishment toward users of ethical (vs. conventional) brands who commit moral transgressions. In response to identical marketplace transgressions, we observe that liberals punish ethical brand users less than conventional brand users. In contrast, conservatives punish the same users of ethical brands more than conventional brand users. We document that this bias stems from how people interpret the inconsistency between the ethical branding and the act of transgression, rather than from a group-identity effect, showing how it does not arise in the absence of inconsistent information or when consumers are not able to integrate the inconsistent information to their judgments. We also investigate an avenue by which firms can reframe their ethical  branding to reduce this politically motivated bias. We discuss this work's implications for moral judgments, marketplace attribute formation, and the branding of ethical goods in a politically divided world.

Document type: 
Article

Internet Interest in Colon Cancer Following the Death of Chadwick Boseman: Infoveillance Study

File(s): 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-06-15
Abstract: 

Background: Compared with White Americans, Black Americans have higher colon cancer mortality rates but lower up-to-date screening rates. Chadwick Boseman was a prominent Black American actor who died of colon cancer on August 28, 2020. As announcements of celebrity diagnoses often result in increased awareness, Boseman’s death may have resulted in greater interest in colon cancer on the internet, particularly among Black Americans.

 

Objective: This study aims to quantify the impact of Chadwick Boseman’s death on web-based search interest in colon cancer and determine whether there was an increase in interest in regions of the United States with a greater proportion of Black Americans.

 

Methods: We conducted an infoveillance study using Google Trends (GT) and Wikipedia pageview analysis. Using an autoregressive integrated moving average algorithm, we forecasted the weekly relative search volume (RSV) for GT search topics and terms related to colon cancer that would have been expected had his death not occurred and compared it with observed RSV data. This analysis was also conducted for the number of page views on the Wikipedia page for colorectal cancer. We then delineated GT RSV data for the term colon cancer for states and metropolitan areas in the United States and determined how the RSV values for these regions correlated with the percentage of Black Americans in that region. Differences in these correlations before and after Boseman’s death were compared to determine whether there was a shift in the racial demographics of the individuals conducting the searches.

 

Results: The observed RSVs for the topics colorectal cancer and colon cancer screening increased by 598% and 707%, respectively, and were on average 121% (95% CI 72%-193%) and 256% (95% CI 35%-814%) greater than expected during the first 3 months following Boseman’s death. Daily Wikipedia page view volume during the 2 months following Boseman’s death was on average 1979% (95% CI 1375%-2894%) greater than expected, and it was estimated that this represented 547,354 (95% CI 497,708-585,167) excess Wikipedia page views. Before Boseman’s death, there were negative correlations between the percentage of Black Americans living in a state or metropolitan area and the RSV for colon cancer in that area (r=−0.18 and r=−0.05, respectively). However, in the 2 weeks following his death, there were positive correlations between the RSV for colon cancer and the percentage of Black Americans per state and per metropolitan area (r=0.73 and r=0.33, respectively). These changes persisted for 4 months and were all statistically significant (P<.001).

 

Conclusions: There was a significant increase in web-based activity related to colon cancer following Chadwick Boseman’s death, particularly in areas with a higher proportion of Black Americans. This reflects a heightened public awareness that can be leveraged to further educate the public.

Document type: 
Article

The Convenience of Shopping via Voice AI: Introducing AIDM

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-02-08
Abstract: 

The purpose of this paper is to propose an updated view of consumer choice based on AI and inherent convenience addiction to smart speakers. Following the MacInnis framework for developing conceptual contributions of summarization, integration, and delineation, we review the current consumer decision-making literature and theory to demonstrate consumers' increasing tendency to outsource decisions to AI. Today's customers value convenience: the less time and effort they spend on a purchase, the better they perceive the transaction. AI is taking convenience to higher levels for consumers as they outsource their decisions to bots and inherent algorithms. This is particularly accurate for low-involvement everyday purchases. Our study's contribution is fourfold. First, we introduce a new model of AI-influenced decision-making (AIDM) processes. Second, our conceptual model suggests that managers need to change their interpretation of their customers' decision-making-processes in the new, AI-influenced marketplace. The shift in consumers' behavior toward reliance on home voice bots for purchase has significant implications for the retail sector. Third, our model differentiates between high and low involvement AI-influenced decision-making processes. Fourth, our study highlights how branding as we know it is challenged in an AI-dominated environment.

Document type: 
Article

Factors for Sustainable Online Learning in Higher Education during the COVID-19 Pandemic

File(s): 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-04-30
Abstract: 

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has affected educational institutions and instructors in an unprecedented way. The majority of educational establishments were forced to take their courses online within a very short period of time, and both instructors and students had to learn to navigate the digital array of courses without much training. Our study examined factors that affect students’ attitude toward online teaching and learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. It is different from other online learning studies where online courses are mostly a method of choice, with suitable support from institutions and expectation from instructors and students, rather than a contingency. Under this specific environment, we utilized an online survey to collect students’ feedback from eleven universities across Hong Kong. Using partial least squares for analysis on the 400 valid samples we received, we found that peer interactions and course design have the most salient impact on students’ attitude, whereas interactions with instructors has no effect at all on students’ attitude. Furthermore, we also provide suggestions on using the existing technologies purchased during COVID-19 for a more sustainable learning environment going forward.

Document type: 
Article

Meta-Analysis Data of 104 Renewable Mini-Grid Projects for Rural Electrification

File(s): 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-01-09
Abstract: 

The data presented here contains project-level details on 104 renewable energy mini-grid projects installed for rural electrification across the globe; a subset of which is used to derive evidence-based empirical insights on the drivers of project success and cost in the article “An Analysis of Renewable Mini-Grid Projects for Rural Electrification” [1]. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first meta-collection of micro-level data on rural mini-grid installations. In addition, the literature search and the inclusion criteria of the studies used in the meta-analysis is reported, along with a complete list of sources, which can be utilized directly by other researchers and practitioners to reproduce or expand the database according to their own criteria and use it in further studies. Finally, the supplemental material in [2] includes the Stata code and output that can be used to reproduce the meta-analysis results in [1].

Document type: 
Article

How Income Shapes Moral Judgments of Prosocial Behavior

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2020-08-01
Abstract: 

The current research extends past work on how consumers (as “observers”) view ethical choices made by others (“actors”). Using a person-centered approach to moral judgments, we show that consumers are judged differentially, based on their income, for engaging in certain prosocial behaviors. Nine studies demonstrate that engaging in the same prosocial behavior, such as volunteering, leads to different responses depending on whether the actor earns income versus receives government assistance. Consistent with our theorizing, we find that aid recipients are given less latitude in how they spend their time than those earning an income and are scrutinized to a greater degree for their choices because people believe their time would be better spent seeking employment. Consequently, the lower moral judgments of aid recipients who choose to volunteer (vs. income earners) are driven, at least in part, by the anger observers feel about the perceived misuse of time. Additional information or cues about employment efforts or work inability attenuate these judgments. Importantly, we document implications for support for federal spending on welfare programs.

Document type: 
Article