Simon Fraser University Vancity Office of Community Engagement

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Truth and Reclamation: Teaching Squamish Language at SFU

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2019-04-26
Abstract: 

“We either bring our languages back or we die.” says Khelsilem, the founder of the Squamish Language Immersion Program at SFU. With Trudeau’s announcement of a National Indigenous Languages Act, and continual interest in meaningful reconciliation, Khelsilem seeks to share the lessons of running a full-time adult immersion program with SFU. After its first year the program celebrates 15 new language speakers, with another 15 on the way as another cohort begins in September 2017.This talk discussed the development and implementation of curriculum, classroom strategies, and results of this groundbreaking program.

 

There was also a dialogue with discussants:Julie Flett, Andrea Reimer and Charlene George. The evening was moderated by Am Johal.

Document type: 
Video

Canadian Society For Continental Philosophy Conference Keynote: Dr. Howard Caygill

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014-10-03
Abstract: 

Dr. Howard Caygill discusses ideas from his book “On Resistance: A Philosophy of Defiance”. In this book, Dr. Caygill conducts the first ever systematic analysis of ‘resistance’: as a means of defying political oppression, in its relationship with military violence and its cultural representation. 

Document type: 
Video

Democracy and the City

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014-10-05
Abstract: 

Democracy and the City was the first student led forum hosted by the Urban Studies Graduate Student Association at Simon Fraser University. The forum explores how, and why, urban regions are desirable sites for inclusive forms of democratic governance. This video shows the opening remarks by Dr. Patrick Smith followed by the Youth Engagement Panel including Juliana Buitenhuis, David Sadler and Brandon Yan. 

 

Document type: 
Video

Book Unlaunch: The Muslimah Who Fell to Earth

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2019-05-08
Abstract: 

An enlightening evening of personal stories and reflections shared by Canadian Muslim women. This dialogue will reveal the diversity of the writers featured in this anthology and highlight varying perspectives that exist in the Muslim Diaspora.

The conversation will be moderated by Ray Hsu. Seemi Ghazi, lecturer in Classical Arabic at UBC, Poet, performer of Sufi vocal arts, and reciter of Quran, will grace the evening with poetic recitations that will open and close the evening with powerful messages.

ABOUT THE BOOK

These twenty-one personal stories are told by women from practically all backgrounds and persuasions—devout and not-so devout, professionals and housewives, westernized and traditional, wearing jeans, hijab, or niqab, straight and gay, and originally from Africa, North America, South Asia, the Middle East, and East Asia—revealing in their own ways what it means to them to be a Muslim woman (a "Muslimah"). What we get is a complex of stories, all challenging conventions and stereotypes, and united by two ideas—Islam (or the Quran) and nationality (Canadian).

Document type: 
Audio

Justin A. Langlois — Uselessness & Antagonism: Suggestions for a New Engagement

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014-10-08
Abstract: 

There is no exchange value to something useless. It strives to impede, slow down, and malfunction. Uselessness is unabsorbable. It destabilizes the substrate into which it is brought and adds unnecessary complexity, weight, and time to a transaction. We have to wonder, when so many forms of resistance, aesthetics, logic, and affect have been co-opted by highly-distributed, violent, and autonomous expressions of power and infrastructures, what room is there left for action within legible forms of art, activism, and education? This lecture explores the possibilities for uselessness and antagonism to act as increasingly vital options for creative intervention in these spaces and in everyday life. Antagonistic social practices and useless engagements may most readily and effectively help us develop the spaces of exchange that can best cultivate the capacity for critical engagement with our cities, infrastructure, and communities. 

Document type: 
Video

Panel on C-51 - The "Anti-Terror" Bill

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015-03-24
Abstract: 

This panel addresses the implications of Bill C-51, the so-called "Anti-Terror" Bill, for the future of democratic institutions in this country.

Document type: 
Video

Flamenco Juerga - Film Screening, Performance and Artist Talkback

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015-03-28
Abstract: 

A celebrated part of the Downtown Eastside Heart of the City Festival since 2010, Barrio Flamenco: Flamenco for the People, is a community of spirit, pride, and passion. Kelty McKerracher and filmmaker Colin Askey hosted the first public screening of a short film about our growing flamenco community in the Downtown Eastside. Learn about the history of flamenco and how it resonates with the neighbourhood's values and struggles. Best of all, be treated to a live performance and talkback with some of Vancouver's most exciting flamenco artists as well as special guests the Carnegie Flamencos!

Document type: 
Video

EMMA Talks: Decolonial Love: Building Resurgent Communities of Connection

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015-04-08
Abstract: 

Kelsey Cham Corbett is a community organizer, activist and settler of Chinese and Irish descent. Being involved with projects like the Purple Thistle has brought depth and insight into trying to understand what the hell is going on in the world. The former Surrey gangster, punk, national karate champion, roller derby coach and player has since focused on starting education-based projects, such as FARMcamp – a youth summer camp on Cortes Island – and a grassroots bioremediation course for young people to learn how plants, mushrooms, and bacteria can be used to clean up contaminated land. Kelsey currently lives in East Van with all the people a person could want in their life – an awesome partner, a best friend, and a 6-year-old best bud. Kelsey is currently organizing with the grassroots environmental justice group Rising Tide and is co-founding the Surrey Youth Space – a youth-run drop-in space focused on art, music and activism.

Leanne Betasamosake Simpson is “a gifted writer who brings passion and commitment to her storytelling and who has demonstrated an uncommon ability to manage an impressive range of genres from traditional storytelling to critical analysis, from poetry to the spoken word, from literary and social activism.” Leanne is the author of three books; Dancing on Our Turtle’s Back, The Gift Is in the Making and Islands of Decolonial Love, and the editor of Lighting the Eighth Fire, This Is An Honour Song (with Kiera Ladner) and The Winter We Danced: Voice from the Past, the Future and the Idle No More Movement (Kino-nda-niimi collective). Leanne holds a PhD from the University of Manitoba and has lectured at universities across Canada. She is of Michi Saagiig Nishnaabeg ancestry and a member of Alderville First Nation.

Document type: 
Video

Jordan Strom — Verging on the Visible: Recent Art From Surrey and its Proximities

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014-10-21
Abstract: 

Jordan Strom, curator of exhibitions and collections at the Surrey Art Gallery, draws from several recent Surrey Art Gallery exhibitions including Beyond Vague Terrain: The City and the Serial Image (2012) & Scenes of Selves, Occasions for Ruses (2012) and Figuring Ground (2013) in this presentation.  He examines select artworks that engage with the Canadian ‘edge city’ condition and situate a number of key artistic strategies—and the relative invisibility of ‘edge city’ cultural production—within both the Vancouver and international art contexts. 

Document type: 
Video

Alternatives to the Housing Crisis: Case Study Vienna

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2019-05-19
Abstract: 

The worldwide crisis of a dramatic lack of affordable housing — even in affluent cities such as Vancouver and Vienna — is part of a larger urban crisis that is based on speculation of urban land, the redistribution of wealth from the poor to the rich, and on the collectivization of losses and the privatization of gains characteristic of neoliberalism.

Therefore, a politics aiming at the right to affordable housing for all is necessary in this moment. And housing, of course, is always more than itself — for we are housed in cities and thus also in infrastructural networks, power relations, public spaces, all of which are under pressure from market appropriation. In this talk, Gabu Heindl, architect and urban planner from Vienna, Austria, proposes equality, justice and the enabling of political dissensus as parameters for city planning.

Using Vienna as a case study, this lecture explores the relationship of affordable housing to urban planning politics and will discuss historic and current housing policies, not least in a critical cross-analysis with the Vancouver case. Touching upon the re-articulated model function of 1920s Red Vienna, Heindl will present her approach to combining strong claims (Setzungen) in public planning with a critique of paternalistic governance and with maintaining zones of contact with popular agency.

Gabu Heindl is an architect/urban planner and theorist in Vienna, Austria. Her practice (GABU Heindl Architecture) specializes in public interventions, cultural and social buildings, urban research and planning. Her current research focuses on a post-foundational theory of planning politics with regard to radical democracy in contemporary urbanism. Gabu currently teaches in the Institute for Architecture at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna. Since 2013, she has been president of ÖGFA (Austrian Society for Architects) and a lecturer at the Institute for Art and Architecture at the Academy of Fine Arts. She studied both in Vienna and Tokyo and did postdoctoral work at Princeton University as a Fulbright Scholar.

Gabu’s practice also includes the curation of exhibitions and symposia on issues of politics in architecture and urban planning. She is the editor of Just Architecture (ERA21, 2012), Arbeit Zeit Raum (turia+kant, 2008), and anthology on the relationship of post-Fordist work and architecture, and  the co-editor of Position Alltag – Architecture in the Context of Everyday Life (HDA Verlag, 2009).  She has published in numerous architectural journals such as JAE, Umbau, ARPA, Volume, and derive.

Document type: 
Video