Simon Fraser University Vancity Office of Community Engagement

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What Does the Insite Decision Mean?

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012-03-14
Abstract: 

On September 29, 2011, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled unanimously to uphold Insite's exemption from the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, allowing the facility to stay open indefinitely.  What does this decision mean for drug policy not only for BC, but also across Canada?  Lawyer  Monique Pongracic-Speier talked about the implications of the decision.

Document type: 
Video

Tropic of Chaos: An Evening with Christian Parenti

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-12-02
Abstract: 

Christian Parenti talks about his latest book, 'Tropic of Chaos: Climate Change and the New Geography of Violence', a "brilliant weather report from the near future of world politics" (Mike Davis). The era of climate war is upon us. Extreme weather brought on by global warming is unleashing cascades of unrest and violence across the globe, from Africa to Asia to the Americas. In Tropic of Chaos, award-winning journalist and sociologists Christian Parenti reports from the front lines of this gathering social and environmental catastrophe. Combining historical research and academically informed theory with on-the-ground reporting, Parenti shows how environmental crisis is already colliding with the twin legacies of cold war militarism and unbridled free market economics to cause fragile nations to disintegrate into failed states. He critiques the way the countries of the Global North have responded to this dangerous new world: rather than adapt by defusing tensions and embracing cleaner forms of energy, these governments are responding with greater repression, surveillance, and a program of border militarization and permanent counterinsurgency. Christian Parenti is a contributing editor at The Nation, a Puffin Foundation Writing Fellow at The Nation Institute, and a visiting scholar at the City University of New York. He has a Ph.D. in sociology from the London School of Economics. The author of Lockdown America, The Soft Cage, and The Freedom. Parenti has written for Fortune, The New York Times, Los AngelesTimes, Washington Post, Playboy, Mother Jones, and The London Review of Books. He has held fellowships from the Open Society Institute, Rockefeller Brother Fund and the Ford Foundation; and has won numerous awards, including the 2009 Lange-Tailor Prize and “Best Magazine Writing 2008” from the Society for Professional Journalists. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Document type: 
Video

Recognition, Reconciliation and Resentment in Indigenous Politics

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-11-16
Abstract: 

Dr. Glen Coulthard is an assistant professor in the First Nations Studies Program and the Department of Political Science. Glen has written and published numerous articles and chapters in the areas of contemporary political theory, indigenous thought and politics, and radical social and political thought (marxism, anarchism, post-colonialism). His most recent work on Frantz Fanon and the politics of recognition won Contemporary Political Theory’s Annual Award for Best Article of the Year in 2007. He is Yellowknives Dene First Nations.

Document type: 
Video

Down to the Wire: The Failure of Cannabis Prohibition

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-11
Abstract: 

Featuring: Major Neill Franklin, Damon Barrett and Dr. Evan Wood and moderated by Kathryn Gretsinger. This panel was the first in a series of events hosted by Stop the Violence BC, a coalition of academics, scientists, and past and present law enforcers who, in response to continued gang violence in BC, are endorsing cannabis regulation as a means to improve public health and safety in BC.

Document type: 
Video

Solutions to Homelessness in Metro Vancouver

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-10-26
Abstract: 

As Metro Vancouver prepared to go to the polls in November 2011, Pivot Legal Society, SFU Woodward’s Cultural Unit and moderator Charles Demers in explored the question: What can municipalities do to address the housing crisis in the Lower Mainland? Presented by Pivot Legal Society, SFU Woodward's Vancity Office of Community Engagement and SFU Woodward's Cultural Unit Michael Shapcott, Wellesley Institute via Skype Doug King, Pivot Legal Society Rep from ACORN Canada Kingsley Okyere, Metro Vancouver Mona Woodward, Aboriginal Front Door Society Sarah Van Borek, Dignity Village Project Rep from At Home Project Speakers Bureau Rep from Downtown Eastside Neighbourhood Council Jackie Wong, freelance journalist, Tyee Fellow.

Document type: 
Video

Is TV News Journalism Salvageable?

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-09
Abstract: 

Kai Nagata was CTV's Quebec City Bureau Chief reporting mostly on politics. In July 2011 he quit his job and detailed his reasons for resigning in an open letter entitled "Why I Quit My Job". The blog post went viral and sparked a wide variety of reaction and discussion regarding TV news journalism in Canada and beyond. Nagata's talk was followed by responses from a panel of guests including: David Beers, The Tyee Kathryn Gretsinger, UBC Graduate School of Journalism Dr Bob Hackett, SFU Communications Professor George Orr, former BCIT journalism instructor.

Document type: 
Video

Indian Summer Arts Festival


Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-07
Abstract: 

The SFU Woodward's Cultural Unit partnered with the Indian Summer Festival Society to kick off the inaugural Indian Summer Festival. Held at the Goldcorp Centre for the Arts, it included an interactive Literature Series with notable authors from both India and Canada, including special guests Yann Martel, Bollywood superstar Tabu, journalist Tarun Tejpal, writer Hari Kunzru, and many others.

Document type: 
Video

Health, Harm Reduction and the Law

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-05-17
Abstract: 

In May, 2011, the Supreme Court of Canada was set to hear the Federal Government's Appeal of the decision to allow the Insite supervised injection facility to continue to operate. On the evening of May 17th, the Pivot Legal Society,  the SFU Woodwards Community Engagement Office and moderator Donald MacPherson conducted a  forum exploring what this case is all about and what the Supreme Court's decision will mean for people living with addictions and for the future of Canadian drug policy. The presentation included footage straight from the courtroom in Ottawa. Attendees heard from Monique Pongracic-Speier, lawyer on the case and a representative from Insite.  Dr. Thomas Kerr of the Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS and Maxine Davis, Executive Director of the Dr. Peters Aids Foundation offeedr an assessment of the health impacts of this decision.  Plaintiff Dean Wilson reflected on his journey through the court process and Downtown Eastside activists Bud Osborn and Dave Murray talked about what the fight for a legal supervised injection facility has meant to them and their community.

Document type: 
Video