Simon Fraser University Vancity Office of Community Engagement

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United We Can — with Ken Lyotier

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-11-16
Abstract: 

Ken Lyotier tells stories from his early days in the Downtown Eastside and how he came to found United We Can, an initiative by binners, for binners. United We Can creates economic opportunities for those who rely on collecting and returning recyclables for their income.

In this episode of Below the Radar, Ken is in conversation with host Am Johal about building community in the neighbourhood, advocating for policies and resources to benefit binners, and reaching across difference to support our neighbours and make progressive change.

Document type: 
Audio

Women, Work, More: Migrant Women & Transnational Loving — with Evelyn Encalada Grez

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-11-18
Abstract: 

A transnational labour scholar, co-founder of Justicia for Migrant Workers, and assistant professor from SFU's Labour Studies Program, Evelyn Encalada Grez joins this episode of Women, Work, More to speak about migrant women and their experiences of transnational loving.

 

Evelyn explores the pains that accompany migration, from separating families to the often temporary loves that migrant women find while working within Canada. Despite these pains, Evelyn speaks about the forms of agency that migrant women enact throughout their migration — that often revolves around reasserting their power over their bodies and sexualities.

 

As the episode continues, Evelyns speaks about her past projects that have aided in re-empowering migrant workers and migrant women within their migration. She also shares the changes that need to be made to undo the exploitation inherent within temporary labour migration programs.

 

Throughout the episode we hear quotes from migrant women whom Evelyn has encountered and interviewed as part of her research. These quotes came from Evelyn’s transcribed interviews and are voiced by readers in both English and Spanish. These do not feature the voices of the migrant women who initially spoke these words in order to maintain their anonymity.

Document type: 
Audio

Labour Studies & Justice for Workers — with Kendra Strauss

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-11-23
Abstract: 

The director of the SFU Labour Studies program, Kendra Strauss, joins Am Johal in a conversation about systemic challenges facing workers, and the ways in which workers shape economies and exercise power in the workplace.

 

Honing in on issues of precarious work, low wages, technological change, contracting out, and the devaluing of feminized work like care work, Am and Kendra discuss trends in labour studies and how they impact migrant and racialized workers. Kendra also speaks to how labour studies as a discipline can work in-step with labour organizers and workers to strive towards a just transition, to create better, more secure jobs, and to address social issues that affect all workers.

Document type: 
Audio

Women, Work, More: Senior Women & Economic Insecurity — with Sheila Block & Jo-Ann Hannah

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-11-25
Abstract: 

For this final episode of Women, Work, More, host Alyha Bardi speaks with Sheila Block, a senior economist from the Canadian Center for Policy Alternatives, and Jo-Ann Hannah, retired Director of the Pensions and Benefits at Unifor, and board member at the BC Financial Services Authority.

 

Sheila and Jo-Ann speak in conversation about retirement incomes with a gender and racial equity lens, and explore how pay gaps and gendered life-patterns influence income security for senior women. They speak to the flaws in existing public and private pension systems, discuss the benefits and downfalls of the Canada Pension Plan (CPP), and explore solutions in the realms of structural changes, public services and healthcare, and pooled retirement pensions systems.

 

Throughout the episode we hear from four senior women, as they speak about their life-work trajectories, and the resulting money struggles, worries, or “lucks” they have now — while expressing dissatisfaction with lacking assistance from government systems.

Document type: 
Audio

LGBTQ2S+ Health: Impacts of Stigma — with Travis Salway

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-11-30
Abstract: 

Travis Salway, a social epidemiologist and an assistant professor in SFU’s Faculty of Health Sciences, joins Am Johal in a conversation about syndemic theory, the state of conversion therapy in Canada, and LGBTQ2+ affirming healthcare.

Going in-depth about the systemic health disadvantages of LGBTQ2+ people and the multiple epidemics concurrently affecting them, Am and Travis discuss what needs to be done to advance equity in the Canadian healthcare system and beyond. Travis also speaks to the current limitation of data collection for this vulnerable population – and how he and his team are working to create visual tools to help keep people informed on the state of Canada’s LGBTQ2+ policies.

Document type: 
Audio

Performing History & Land in Vancouver’s Stanley Park — with Selena Couture

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-12-07
Abstract: 

Performance scholar and Associate Professor in the Dramatic Arts department at the University of Alberta Selena Couture joins Am Johal to talk about her latest book, Against the Current and Into the Light. Selena speaks about how her book explores varying historical and contemporary performances involving Stanley Park through language, relationships to land, and the unlearning of settler knowledges. She draws from colonial and counter-colonial performances such as the 1946 Jubilee show, and the illegal public performances of Native Brotherhood of BC in the same year.

Selena also explores how her doctoral dissertation and the taking of hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ language classes influenced the creation of her book, and speaks about the instability of archive-based “truths,” by discussing the fabricated history of Lord Stanley’s dedication of Stanley Park to “people of all colours, creeds and customs.” 

Selena and Am end their conversation by speaking of the absence of Indigenous women from historical archives, and the resonating performances of contemporary Indigenous women artists such as Quelemia Sparrow and Marie Clements.

Document type: 
Audio

Setting the Table for Food Justice — with Tammara Soma

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-06-22
Abstract: 

Community-engaged scholar, current Researcher-in-Residence with SFU’s Community-Engaged Research Initiative and food system planner Tammara Soma joins Am Johal on this episode of Below the Radar. She shares with us what drives her interest in food systems and sustainability, and their relationship to equity and justice. Tammara speaks to her experience and the process of researching in communities –– where she aims to have everyone’s voices represented at the table. 

We hear about the impetus behind co-creating the Food Systems Lab, and how Tammara views the impact of COVID-19 on our current food systems. We also discuss issues with charitable responses to food security, and what kind of justice-centered solutions are needed in a paradoxical system where we have massive food waste, but also food insecurity and hunger.

Restorying the Climate Crisis — with Grace Nosek

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-06-15
Abstract: 

Lawyer, climate storyteller, and founder of the UBC Climate Hub, Grace Nosek, joins host Am Johal on a mission — to publicly uncover feelings of ‘climate doom’ and ‘individual responsibility’ as narratives dispelled by the fossil fuel industry. While leading this charge, Grace speaks about Exxon Mobil at the forefront of climate science — spinning its narrative web that entangles any space from broadcasting and universities, to legislation. 

Grace also discusses her work with the UBC Climate Hub, and the integral role that youth (as well as Indigenous and racialized people) have in this movement of anti-capitalist defiance. She and Am also speak about overcoming eco-anxieties, the importance of making a small day-to-day difference that can ‘ripple outward,’ and Grace’s belief in Pleasure Activism. They end this interview with a brief discussion of Grace’s inspiration to write her hopeful young adult climate fantasy series, Ava of the Gaia.

Document type: 
Audio

Aerial Dance, Circus, and Artistic Production — with Gabrielle Martin

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-06-08
Abstract: 

Dancer, aerialist, choreographer and producer Gabrielle Martin joins host Am Johal on this episode of Below the Radar. Gabrielle tells us how her passion for dance has taken her from spinning fire in an East Van park, to touring the world with Cavalia and Cirque du Soleil, to choreographing and producing her own works.

In the episode, they talk about Gabrielle’s youth as an unschooler/alternative schooler, and how she developed a love for performance and dance through stilt walking, fire dancing, hula hooping and more. Gabrielle also shares her thoughts on the impact of the pandemic on the performing arts, her work as festival manager with the Vancouver International Dance Festival, and the making of Limb(e)s, a feature-length show she developed with her partner, Jeremiah Hughes.

Document type: 
Audio

The Power of Disability Part 6 — with Barb Goode (video)

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-05-27
Abstract: 

Barb is a self-advocate leader who has helped shape the disability movement into what it is today. She is a founding member of BC People First, and has been on the Boards of Inclusion BC, the Canadian Association for Community Living (CACL), and International Inclusion. She is presently serving on the board of directors for PLAN Institute, and also works with ImagineACircle, a consulting collaborative, that acts as both a consultant and voice for inclusion.

In 1995, Barb addressed the UN General Assembly (GA), becoming the first self-advocate to present to the GA. She also played a very important role in 1986, when the Supreme Court of Canada made The Eve Decision and ruled that developmentally disabled adults cannot be forcibly sterilized. Barb was on the Editorial Committee for CLBC and contributed to their Just Say HI campaign. In 2011, Barb published her memoir, A Goode Life, and is currently working on the next edition.

Barb is a prolific presenter and workshop co-host for a variety of groups including; Spectrum Consulting, BC Representative of Children and Youth, ESATTA as a voice for self-advocate leadership, and most recently on a webinar with Cornell University Citizen-Centred Leadership series.

Document type: 
Video