Simon Fraser University Vancity Office of Community Engagement

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La Commune 2021 — with Roxanne Panchasi and Brit Bachmann

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-03-19
Abstract: 

About La Commune 2021

From March 18th through early June 2021, writer and scholar Roxanne Panchasi will be hosting a virtual free school focused on the Paris Commune of 1871 in collaboration with UNIT/PITT Society for Art and Critical Awareness. 

Lasting 10-12 weeks, the free school will be open to the wider public. Anyone can participate by taking in the content shared each week, by attending online events (including screenings, discussions, and presentations by special guests, etc.). Participants can follow the whole of the school's run and/or drop in to check out specific materials or happenings on offer. How much or how little of the free school experience participants engage with is entirely up to them. Free in this instance means without charge, but also without course/attendance requirements, assignments, grades or participant evaluation of any kind.

Roxanne Panchasi

Roxanne is an Associate Professor of History at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, Canada who specializes in the twentieth and twenty-first century France, and the French empire, and its legacies. Her first book, Future Tense: The Culture of Anticipation in France Between the Wars was published by Cornell University Press in 2009. She has written on a range of subjects including: nineteenth-century graphology, prosthetics, the Paris Commune, experimental film, and the teaching of History. Her current book project focuses on the cultural politics of French nuclear weapons and testing in the Algerian Sahara. In it, she examines military, scientific, diplomatic, literary, audio-visual, testimonial, and memorial sources as a broad archive of the”French” bomb in empire. Her most recent article, ‘“No Hiroshima in Africa”: The Algerian War and the Question of French Nuclear Tests in the Sahara’ appeared in the Spring 2019 issue of History Present. In 2013, Dr. Panchasi launched New Books in French Studies, a podcast channel featuring discussions with scholars of France and the Francophone world about their latest books that she hosts on the New Books Network. 

Brit Bachmann

Brit Bachmann is a multidisciplinary artist who writes, draws, and throws clay in Vancouver, Canada, on unceded land belonging to the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh First Nations. She is the Executive Director of UNIT/PITT Society for Art & Critical Awareness, and co-founder of ReIssue with Casey Wei. Brit has previously worked in administration and outreach at VIVO Media Arts Centre, Capture Photography Festival, The Cinematheque; and notably, as Editor-In-Chief of Discorder Magazine (2015-18). She has served on the programming committee of CFRO Vancouver Co-op Radio (2015-18), and the Polaris Music Prize jury (2016-19). Brit is a member of the Board of Directors of VIVO Media Arts Centre, and the Pacific Association of Artist Run Centres (PAARC). She has a Bachelor of Fine Art from the University of British Columbia–Okanagan.

Document type: 
Audio

Communicating Scientific Uncertainty About COVID-19 — with Alice Fleerackers

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-03-16
Abstract: 

Alice Fleerackers is a freelance writer, a researcher at the ScholCommLab, the Communications Officer at Art the Science, and a Science in Society Editor at Science Borealis. As a doctoral student at Simon Fraser University, she is working under the supervision of Dr. Juan Pablo Alperin to explore how controversial science is communicated in the digital sphere.

With degrees in psychology and publishing, Alice is passionate about bringing research into everyday life. As a professional communicator and researcher, she’s had the pleasure of interviewing psychologists, scientists, and many others on everything from the psychology of cat video addiction to the science behind astrological belief. She’s also worked as a magazine editor, a newspaper writer, and a book publicist, and has contributed to outlets such as the Globe and Mail,Nautilus, and more.

Document type: 
Audio

Access to Knowledge for Community Scholars — with Heather De Forest

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-03-09
Abstract: 

Heather is a librarian at Simon Fraser University. She leads the Community Scholars Program, which engages individuals working in the non-profit sector with research publications and identifies and reduces barriers to accessing and using this body of knowledge. Heather is a co-investigator with the STOREE (Supporting Transparent and Open Research Engagement and Exchange) project and a member of the steering committee for the Making Research Accessible initiative.

Document type: 
Audio

Ethical Living in the Anthropocene — with David Chang

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-03-02
Abstract: 

David Chang is a teacher educator, and PhD candidate in the Faculty of Education at Simon Fraser University. He researches contemplative approaches to environmental education. David Chang lives in Vancouver.

Document type: 
Audio

Keeping Culture Alive Through Song — with Russell Wallace

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-02-23
Abstract: 

Russell Wallace is an award-winning composer, producer and traditional singer from the Lil’wat Nation. His music can be heard on soundtracks for film, television and theatre/dance productions across Canada and the USA. Wallace is one of the founding members of the Aboriginal Writers Collective West Coast and is an alumnus of the UBC Creative Writing program. Wallace has written poetry, short fiction, theatre, and music theatre. Wallace was the artist in residence at the Vancouver International Jazz Festival in 2019, a guest programmer for Word Vancouver and was the artistic director for the Aboriginal Electronic Music Festival for a number of years.

Document type: 
Audio

Rechanneling Desires for Indigeneity — with New Red Order

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-02-16
Abstract: 

Adam Khalil (Ojibway) is a filmmaker and artist who lives and works in Brooklyn. His practice attempts to subvert traditional forms of ethnography through humor, relation, and transgression. Khalil’s work has been exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art, Sundance Film Festival, Walker Arts Center, Lincoln Center, Tate Modern, Toronto Biennial and Whitney Biennial, among other institutions. Khalil is a core contributor to New Red Order (NRO) and a co-founder of COUSINS Collective. Khalil is the recipient of various fellowships and grants, including but not limited to: Sundance Art of Nonfiction, Jerome Artist Fellowship, and Gates Millennium Scholarship. Khalil received his BA from Bard College.

Zack Khalil (Ojibway) is a filmmaker and artist from Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, currently based in Brooklyn, NY. His work often explores an indigenous worldview and undermines traditional forms of historical authority through the excavation of alternative histories and the use of innovative documentary forms. He recently completed a B.A. at Bard College in the Film and Electronic Arts Department and is a UnionDocs Collaborative Fellow and Gates Millennium Scholar.

Jackson Polys is a visual artist who seeks to dissolve artificial boundaries between perceptions of traditional Native art forms, practices, and contemporary life, and whose practice reflects an inquiry into the limits and viability of desires for indigenous growth. Prior to pursuing his undergraduate education in New York he worked as Alaska-based artist Stron Softi, with solo exhibitions at the Alaska State Museum and the Anchorage Museum, and has been engaged by museums seeking replacements for repatriated works. He obtained a BA in Art History and Visual Arts from Columbia University (2013) and holds an MFA in Visual Arts from Columbia University (2015). He is the recipient of a 2017 NACF Mentor Artist Fellowship and Advisor to Indigenous New York, the collaborative program initiative co-founded by Mohawk artist Alan Michelson and the Vera List Center for Art and Politics.

Document type: 
Audio

Redistributing Power in Universities — with Charmaine Lyn

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-02-09
Abstract: 

Charmaine works closely with Canada’s seven designated Changemaker campuses and their change leaders to deepen and accelerate field-level collaboration and transformation in Canadian post-secondary. In this role, Charmaine is leading Ashoka Canada’s targeted efforts to build upon growing momentum for social impact work in Canadian higher ed by identifying and accompanying prospective Canadian campuses through the designation process. Charmaine draws from over 15 years’ experience advancing equity, diversity, social accountability, and decolonization as drivers of post-secondary institutional change. Prior to joining Ashoka, Charmaine was Senior Director of the Office of Community Engagement at Concordia University in Montreal, where she also served as a Special Advisor to the Provost on Indigenous Directions, and stewarded the launch of the SHIFT Centre for Social Transformation. Charmaine also previously directed recruitment and admissions to McGill University’s Faculty of Medicine and Faculty of Law. Born in Jamaica and raised in Tio’ tia:ke (Montreal), where she currently resides, Charmaine is a first-generation university attendee and lawyer by training. She holds a BA in English Literature and BCL (Civil Law) and LL.B. (common law) degrees from McGill University. She speaks English and French.

Document type: 
Audio

Urban Mobility and Transportation Policy — with Anthony Perl

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-02-04
Abstract: 

My research crosses disciplinary and national boundaries to explore policy decisions made about transportation, cities and the environment. I have published in dozens of scholarly journals, including Energy Policy, Transport Policy, Transportation Research, Journal of Transport Geography, World Transport Policy and Practice, Journal of Air Transport Management, Transportation Research Record, Journal of Public Policy, Canadian Public Policy, Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, Journal of Planning Education and Research, Journal of Urban Technology, Canadian Journal of Political Science and Scientific American. My work has been awarded prizes for outstanding papers presented at the World Conference on Transport Research and the Canadian Transportation Research Forum. 

I have advised governments in Australia, Belgium, Canada, France and the United States on transportation and environmental research and policy development. I served on the board of VIA Rail, Canada’s national passenger railway. I have chaired the Rail Group of the U.S. Transportation Research Board (TRB), a division of the National Academies of Science, Medicine and Engineering. I am currently a Fellow of the Post-Carbon Institute and Adjunct Professor of Urban Studies at Griffith University in Queensland, Australia. Closer to home, I sit on the Vancouver City Planning Commission.

Document type: 
Audio

Laughing in Pandemic Times — with Charles Demers (Video)

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-02-02
Abstract: 

My name is Charlie Demers — I’m a Juno-nominated comedian and I’m a BC Book Prize -nominated author, and my voice features prominently on your parents’ favourite public radio show & your child’s favourite Netflix cartoon (so long as your parents listen to CBC’s The Debaters and your kid watches either of the Emmy-winning programs Beat Bugs or The Last Kids on Earth). I’ve led an idiosyncratic life that has included, among other things, membership in a communist sect; opening, on various occasions, for Sarah Silverman, Marc Maron, Hannibal Buress, Bob Odenkirk & David Cross; organizing a union at a video arcade; making a cooking show pilot with my mother-in-law; writing jokes with Dave Foley of The Kids in the Hall; introducing Noam Chomsky at an anti-war rally of more than fifteen thousand people at Vancouver’s Sunset Beach; sharing a bill talking about anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorder along with Stanley Cup finalist Kelly Hrudey & his daughter; learning a Cantopop love song for my wedding banquet; and, most recently, going to seminary.

Document type: 
Video

Laughing in Pandemic Times — with Charles Demers

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-02-02
Abstract: 

My name is Charlie Demers — I’m a Juno-nominated comedian and I’m a BC Book Prize -nominated author, and my voice features prominently on your parents’ favourite public radio show & your child’s favourite Netflix cartoon (so long as your parents listen to CBC’s The Debaters and your kid watches either of the Emmy-winning programs Beat Bugs or The Last Kids on Earth). I’ve led an idiosyncratic life that has included, among other things, membership in a communist sect; opening, on various occasions, for Sarah Silverman, Marc Maron, Hannibal Buress, Bob Odenkirk & David Cross; organizing a union at a video arcade; making a cooking show pilot with my mother-in-law; writing jokes with Dave Foley of The Kids in the Hall; introducing Noam Chomsky at an anti-war rally of more than fifteen thousand people at Vancouver’s Sunset Beach; sharing a bill talking about anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorder along with Stanley Cup finalist Kelly Hrudey & his daughter; learning a Cantopop love song for my wedding banquet; and, most recently, going to seminary.

Document type: 
Audio