Simon Fraser University Vancity Office of Community Engagement

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Intergenerational Community Building – with InterGenNS

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Abstract: 

Am Johal sits down with the team at InterGenNS, a North Shore community project working to inspire intergenerational connections. This intergenerational trio, Rachelle Patille, Sue Carabetta, and June Maynard, speak about bridging the gap of academia and community, the impacts that COVID had on project goals and funding, and the challenges of embarking upon community-engaged research.

The team also explores their personal stories that led them towards intergenerational programming, and discusses how InterGenNS has created community connectivity and collaboration among organizations, partners, and community members across different ages and social intersections. They also speak about their optimism and excitement surrounding the future of InterGenNS as we slowly emerge from the pandemic.

Document type: 
Audio

Vancouver Podcast Festival: Podcasting Climate Change

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Abstract: 

The climatic events of 2021 (heat, fires, floods, storms) have brought home the reality of climate change like never before — and the urgency for media to address this crisis couldn’t feel greater. But how do we talk about the climate emergency in ways that move us away from despair and disaster coverage? How can podcasts shift the conversation in ways the mainstream media cannot or refuses to do? How do we talk about climate justice, Indigenous sovereignty, and de-colonizing media?

For this special release, tune into the live event recording from Podcasting Climate Change, a session at the 2021 Vancouver Podcast Festival. This recording features a panel discussion curated and moderated by Below the Radar host Am Johal. He is joined by Chief Patrick Michell, Julia Kidder, Eugene Kung and Grace Nosek.

This Vancouver Podcast Festival event was presented in partnership with the Vancouver Public Library.

Document type: 
Audio

Bramah and the Beggar Boy — with Renée Sarojini Saklikar

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Abstract: 

Writer and poet, Renée Sarojini Saklikar joins Am Johal on this episode of Below the Radar to talk about her latest work, Bramah and The Beggar Boy, first in a series, THOT J BAP (The Heart Of This Journey Bears All Patterns). In this episode, Renée reads passages from her new story and discusses the act of writing as a woman of colour, her creative process, and how writing can be a form of survival and resistance.

Her book is an epic poem and story which was an amazing 10-year undertaking, describing a future dealing with climate change and a viral bio-contagion. Bramah, a locksmith, part human and part goddess, is part of the poet’s “life-long project of unlocking and unbinding, of challenging the primacy of borders, the formal, the political and the self-imposed.” More details about Renée’s new book and her previous books can be found in the resources below.

Document type: 
Audio

Dialogue & Social Change — with Mark Winston

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-12-14
Abstract: 

Below the Radar explores the transformational capacity of dialogue with apiculturist, award-winning author, and SFU Professor of Biological Sciences Mark Winston. He is in conversation with host Am Johal about SFU’s Semester in Dialogue program and the importance of providing students with opportunities to be engaged with their communities.

Mark shares how part of a university’s job is to help people realize who they want to be in the world, speaking to the impact of alternative pedagogical models that embrace dialogue and art. We hear stories from his time as director of the Morris J. Wosk Centre for Dialogue, and the complex process of creating a non-traditional, interdisciplinary program such as the Semester in Dialogue.

They speak about Mark’s journey with dialogue, which grew out of his fascination with bee communication. He also talks about the shortcomings of dialogue, what conversations need to be elevated emerging from the pandemic, and how we can translate them into building equity and compassion for all.

Document type: 
Audio

Experimental Documentary Practices — with Andrea Luka Zimmerman

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-10-05
Abstract: 

Award-winning artist, filmmaker, and activist Andrea Luka Zimmerman joins Below the Radar from the UK to speak to us about her approach to making art and films — in deep collaboration, over long periods of time, and always cultivating community. Host Am Johal speaks to Andrea about how her work explores counter-memories to structural violence and how we dream together to build new worlds.

They discuss Andrea’s past and recent works, including Estate, A Reverie, Here for Life, and others, delving into the aesthetics and experimental nature of her work, as well as the political orientation around themes of displacement, gentrification, human rights, and social connection that run through her practice.

Document type: 
Audio

Climate Justice & Inequality: Environmental Law and the Politics of Extraction — with Eugene Kung

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-09-21
Abstract: 

Environmental lawyer Eugene Kung joins Below the Radar’s Climate Justice & Inequality series to discuss pipeline politics in BC and the role of law in fighting the climate crisis. Eugene shares about how law has been wielded as a mechanism for enacting colonialism, and the various ways it can instead be a tool for effecting major change and upholding human rights.

Eugene discusses different legal strategies to mitigate climate change — from legislation and law reform, to legal challenges against extractive energy projects that drive pollution. He speaks to a positive shift that has seen more Indigenous nations asserting their own laws and sovereignty in decision-making, as caretakers of their lands. 

He and Am also discuss how to decentre whiteness and Western perspectives in the climate justice movement and the importance of connecting environmentalism with other social movements and systemic issues.

Document type: 
Audio

Climate Justice & Inequality: The Future of Canadian Climate Policy — with Marc Lee

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-09-14
Abstract: 

Co-Director of the Climate Justice Project at the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, and senior economist, Marc Lee, joins Am Johal to discuss the successes and failures of Canadian climate policies across the political spectrum. Marc speaks about the origins of the Climate Justice Project, and conceptualizes how reaching a net-zero carbon economy can be achieved — through a fundamental restructuring of Canadian and BC systems, and the implementation of decolonizing practices.

Am and Marc also discuss how approaches like carbon pricing and carbon capture systems do little to counteract climate change, and instead offer “escape hatches” for the fossil fuel industry. They explore how other government-based responses like subsidizing pipelines, or setting climate goals for the distant future, do not adequately address the imminent threat of climate change. Marc ends by discussing how we need to deal with this climate emergency with the same level of urgency that was enacted in BC’s COVID-19 response.

Document type: 
Audio

Climate Justice & Inequality: Centring Justice in the Climate Emergency — with Anjali Appadurai

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-09-07
Abstract: 

Community leader and climate justice activist Anjali Appadurai joins Am Johal for the second instalment of Below the Radar’s Climate Justice & Inequality series. Anjali is a Climate Justice Lead at Sierra Club BC, the Sectoral Organizer for the Climate Emergency Unit, as well as the founder of Padma Centre for Climate Justice.

Anjali and Am talk about the growth of the climate movement, and shifting the focus from being ‘green’ to centering justice for all in the fight against climate change. They speak about lifting up the youth and Indigenous leaders at the forefront of the struggle, as well as how to get involved and make the movement accessible to all.

Document type: 
Audio

Decolonizing Climate Justice — with Khelsilem

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-08-31
Abstract: 

Squamish Nation Councillor and community leader Khelsilem joins Am Johal on this first episode of Below the Radar’s Climate Justice & Inequality series. In this episode, they discuss the climate crisis as a result of the colonial project, how climate change hits hardest for those already at a disadvantage, and the spaces where colonialism has existed within climate movements.

Khelsilem speaks to his critique of fossil fuel infrastructure, the false narrative of individual responsibility, and the role governments play in worsening the crisis through policy decisions that favour oil and gas. We also hear about innovative affordable housing projects, such as Squamish Nation’s Sen̓áḵw Development, and how to build climate-friendly design into new housing models.

Document type: 
Audio

Feminist Economics and a Just Transition — with Alicia Massie

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-07-20
Abstract: 

Below the Radar dives into the call for a feminist economic recovery and a just transition with SFU School of Communication PhD Candidate Alicia Massie. Alicia is a Progressive Economics Fellow with the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives and a Research Assistant and conference organizer with SFU’s Community-Engaged Research Initiative.

As a feminist political ecomomist and community-engaged researcher, Alicia joins host Am Johal to discuss her research around an economic transition for Canada that can bring us into a more equitable and green future.

They discuss pandemic recovery as an opportunity to implement long-term solutions to ongoing and intersecting issues, such as systemic racism, gender-based inequities and climate change. Alicia speaks to the value of the care economy and investing in green infrastructure like childcare, healthcare and education. She also shares some of her learnings from Fort McMurray and how the inevitable shift away from a fossil fuel-based economy must not leave resource industry workers and their communities behind.

Document type: 
Audio